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Full text of "The Chanticleer [serial]"

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DUKE 
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THE CHANTICLEER 



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= 1928 




COPYRIGHT 

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James N. Truesdale 
Editor 

Cecil E. Smathers 
Business Manager 




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THE 1928 

CHANTICLEER 



PUBLISHED ANNUALLY 

by the SENIOR CLASS 
DUKE UNIVERSITY 
DURHAM,N.C. 
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FOREWORD . 



CP^he decorative theme for the Qhanticleer has been taken from the art of 
^ classic Qreece. In that land and age were conceived the ideals of 
political democracy and intellectual liberty, and the belief that divine 
powers are not jealous of the hitman mind; that knouiedge and goodness 
are the goals of mortal endeavor, and that men may reaso7\ably hope, 
and should unceasingly strive, to attain them. On these principles our 
education rests, and Qreek designs appear Ivith true significance in pages 
that reflect a university. .y^ .y^ ./^ ./> -^ .^^ 

^or us of T)uke there is a more particular suggestion. In early days 
Qreece was a land of little luxury or grandiose achievement, poor and 
crude in comparison with the contemporary East, yet it was Qreece; and 
even in the richest and inost brilliant of the later centuries there ivas little 
debt to any alien source, and reverence for the simple nobility of the ances- 
tral age was never lacking. So, as Ive look forward Ivith proud hope 
to the enviable fortune and great accomplishment of IDuke University, 
we realize luell that this is still "trinity Qollege; the splendor of our 
future only increases our loyalty to the <S\lma abater which Ive have 
known and loved. ~/^ ./^ ./^ .^ .^ .^ .^ 





CONTENT! 

w 

^hc University 
^he (glasses 

cAthletics 

Organizations 

features 




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THE CHANTICLEER 

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RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 

to 

DR. WILLIAM HANE WANNAMAKER, Dean 

Whose keen insight into character, earnest devotion to pro/ilcnis of student life, broad- 
minded tolerance of human frailties, loyal friendship to the deserving, and unselfish zecd for 
the advancement of our University, command our affection, admiration, and esteem. 



"As a teacher, thorough, thoughtful, inspiring, 
sympathetic; as an ofhcial, firm yet fair, cour- 
teous and considerate; as a friend, appreciative, 
dependali'e and constant; as a citizen, a vital 
factor in the life of the community and a needed 
link between the 'town and the Gown,' the city 
and the community." H. E. Spence, 1907. 

"He taught. Once near him, we never have lost 
our wholesome respect for the keen flash of his 
eye. And those who have been privileged to sit 
in his classroom can vouch for his impatience 
with anything shoddy. If heartening men to 
high endeavor and introduction to a passion for 
the beauty of the world as it is and as it can be 
made to be, — if this is excellence, here is testi- 
mony grateful and unreserved to a prince among 
teachers." Gii.mer Siler, 1909. 

"For myself, I prefer to think of the Dean not 
as a Dean but as a young professor of German 
under whose tutelage one caught visions of a 
new and beautitful culture, and before whose 
hearthfire of winter evenings one made good talk 
about life and manners and philosophies and 
other things foreign to a liberal education. As 
one who learned from him about Faust, who bor- 
rowed his guide books, who was pointed by him 
to interesting paths and dear curiosities, I hereby 
gladly heave away at the bushel under which he 
hides his light. All the more lustih' do I do so 
because in the perspective of seventeen sped years 
the warmth and (juality of this teacher's person- 
ality have not diminished, and because in ma- 
turity I have preserved for him the same respect 
and affection that he inspired in me in my 
youth." Louis I. Jaffe, 1911. 

"I am one of many who cannot think back to 
undergraduate days without instantly coming 
again under the spell of the inspiration, the in- 
fluence which was Wannamaker. . . Many of 
us owe to him in largest measure \vhatever con- 
tact life has given us with culture, thought, beau- 
tiful letters. 

"He had an inspirational capacity all his own, 
which propelled his students with zest and rian 
on to other radiant realms aside from and beyond 
the scope of his own field of German language 



and literature. ... He did not merely teach 
us letters. He introduced us to humanity, its 
storm and stress, its romance and its H'eltscli- 
mertz, its joys and its sorrows, its illusions and 
its disillusionments, above all its eternal striving, 
and its E-zuig-lf-'cibliche which draws us on." 
Sidney S. Alderman, 191 3. 

"With the passing of years the memories of men 
who have played a part in our lives stand out 
ever more clearly. They hold firm places in our 
affections. l'he\" are our friends. Hundreds of 
graduates and students will join me in saying 
of Dean Wannamaker, 'He is my friend'." 

W. Nev Evans, 1920. 

"It may be that my pleasant recollections of the 
Dean persist because of his high sense of jus- 
tice. And it was more than cold justice. I saw- 
Dean Wannamaker at Plattsburg, soldiering and 
sitting about the barracks cleaning rifles with 
the boys. He didn't cramp their style, either. 
I saw him again at college commanding the re- 
spect of the same ones with whom he had been 
a good fellow at camp. That takes breadth of 
sympathy and a sincere desire to understand and 
to help." J. Earl Gilbreath, 1920. 

" . . .a scholar who loves literature and lan- 
guage and who draws therefrom a personal and 
inspiring philosophy of life ; and a teacher who 
induces students to accomplish arduous work with 
patience, enthusiasm, and effect, and whose influ- 
ence and friendship they prize in all later 
times—" Wesley Taylor, 1920. 

"As a teacher, he increased the size of the uni- 
verse for most of his students, and for some of 
them his teaching opened up new worlds which 
they had not guessed were in existence. With 
him, those in his seminar courses went adven- 
turing with Siegfried, rode with the Valkyries, 
sought for the Rhine gold, fought with Hagen. 
'Literature,' he once wrote in a copy of T/ic 
Nihcluni/rnlied for me, 'provides the Seven 
League Boots.' . . But most of all I loved 

his gentle cynicism which I found to be but a 
cloak for a warm and sympathetic heart." 

R. P. Harriss, 1926. 




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THE CHANTICLEER 
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Construction at Duke 




() ()N1'' W'llO Ikis not \isitcil tlir cmipus in tliicc (ir loiii' yciirs it is iilniost 
i^Ij) inipossibk- to appreciate the chan)ies that lia\e taken phiee. It is very 



natural that the clianges in the physical jilant should be most consjiicuous, 
but in reality these are probably less significant than the ilevelopnient of 
the less conspicuous phases of the institution. The task before those in 
authority was to take a college of high standing and with a long history of usefulness, 
and to develop it into a modern university, preserving the standards and traditions of 
past years. The most significant thing accomplisjied has been the addition to the 
teaching force of men who ha\e a place of real leadership in the educational work. 
There has been no effort to proceed with undue haste, and the wisdom of this jiolicy 
is evident to all who understand the real problems. To recoinit what has been accom- 
pli.'-hed in this invisible upbuilding is far more difficidt but far more interesting and 
inspiring than a description of the development of the building program. 

Even before Mr. James B. Duke executed his indenture in December, 1924, plans 
for buildings on the campus had been prepared. The original plans provided for the 
university buildings to be on the present campus, and the buildings for the Co-ordinate 
College for Women were to be located to tlie north of the old site. When this was 
found impossible on account of the failure to secure land, the whole program was 
changed. 1 he result has been the construction of eleven buildings on the old campus. 
These consist of five dormitories, the I nion, the Librar\, tlie Science Building, the 




Foundations for Oroup "C" noRMiroRMis 



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Auditorium, the Classroom Building, and an apartment for teachsrs. These build- 
ings are now completed and are in use. In addition a central heating plant has been 
provided. From the standpoint of architectural beauty and completeness of appoint- 
ment, they are all that could be desired. The beautifying of the grounds is now going 
on, and the attractiveness of the surroundings adds much to th; aesthetic side of college 
life. 

To make the desired changes in the arrangement of the campus it was necessary 
to tear down three of the old buildings — the Library Building, Alspaugh Hall and 
Craven Memorial Hall. 

The work of constructing buildings on the new site is being carried on rapidly. 
In order to understand just what has been accomplished and to visualize what there 
is to be, it is necessary to visit the site of the new buildings. The roads and approaches 
have already been laid out, and work on the Hospital and Medical School, a group 
of dormitories, and the Union has made great progress. One of the most interesting 
features of the building program is the stone that is being used in the buildings. As 
this is placed in the walls it is more and more apparent that the University was ex- 
ceedingly fortunate in being able to secure a native stone, which is adapted to the 
Gothic style of architecture used. 

All the work is being done by the Duke Construction Company, which was organ- 
ized solely for the purpose of building the new unit for Duke University. 




Medicai, School Fouxdatioxs Beixg Set 



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Officers of the University 



William Pri-stox F"ew 

President 

A.B.. WolTorcl: A.M.. Ph.D.. Harvard; LL.D., 
Wofford. Southwt'.stcrn. and Allegheny. 

Robert Lee Flower.s 

I'ice-Presidinl in the Business Division 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Graduate United States Military Academy; 
-A.M.. Duke. 

\VlLLL\.M H.AXE W.ANNA.MARER 

riie-President in the Educational Department 
Dean of the College 

A.B.. WofTord; .\.M.. Trinity and Harvard; 

Harvard. 1901-03; LeipziK and Berlin. 1903-05; 

Litt.D.. Wofford. 

W'^iLBiRT Cornell Davison 

Dean of the School of Medicine 

A B., Princeton University: B.A.. U.S.. M.A.. 
Oxon. 1915. 191C and 1919; Medical Student. Ox- 
ford. 1913-10; M.D.. Johns-Hopkins ITnlversity, 
1917; Instructor and .As.-^oclate in Pediatrics, 
1919-23. 



Edmi NO Uavlson Soper 

rice-President in the Student I. He Division 
Dean of the School of Religion 

A.B.. D.D.. Dickinson; B.D.. Drew TheoloKlial 
Seminary. 

Frank. Clmje Hrown 

Comptroller 

A.B.. University of .Nashville; A.M.. I'li.D.. Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 



William He\r\ {iLAS.son 

Dean of the Graduate School of .Irts and 
Sciences 

Ph.B . Cornell; University of Pennsylvania, 1897- 
98; Ph.D.. Columbia. 



Alice Mary Baldwin 

Dean of ll^omen 

M.. Cornell; Columbia, 1903-04; Ph.D.. 
University of ChlcaKO. 



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Instruction at Duke 




I'CH SPACE has been given through the daily press, even undue emphas's in 
' many instances, since December, 1924, to the wealth of Duke University and to 
the new building program. Students and Alumni are alike grateful for the great 
benefaction which has made possible the splendid and unparalleled opportunities 
through material equipment. There is, however, a full realization that the in- 
struction of men and women is the paramount duty of an educational institution. In the program 
of expansion this realization is clear in the minds of the administration, and every effort is being 
made to secure additional faculty members whose training, experience and character fit them 
for an unexcelled type of service in higher education. Frankly, the policy seems to be to bring 
here two types of teachers — educators of experience and prestige, who are recognized scholars 
and leaders of thought, and well trained young men of outstanding ability. And it is from these 
two groups that those in authority are striving to secure men for our rapidly increasing faculty. 

In developing the Graduate School men of broad and thorough scholarship are being added 
to the faculty. Names of men of the calibre of Drs McDougall, Pearce, Rippy and others who 
have jrined the faculty within the past three years are answering the question as to whether 
Duke would be able to secure outstanding scholars. 

The faculties for the Medical and Law Schools are also receiving very careful attention. 
We are indeed fortunate in having Dr. Wilbur C. Davison as Dean of the Medical School, which 
is to be opened in 1930. Dr. Davison comes to us with an established reputation as a teacher, a 
physician, and an admin'strator. The Law Faculty is also being enlarged to include men who 
are well trained in legal education and experience. 

Although the graduate and professional schools are rapidly developing, the undergraduate 
school. Trinity College, is still the dominant unit of the University. With the large increase 
in enrollment and the development of the other schools of the University, th; problem of personal 
contacts of undergraduates and the faculty and individual instruction becomes greater. Through 
the work of the Council on Instruction for Freshmen and Sophomores and the personnel work of 
the Deans' offices the Faculty is striving to maintain close and helpful contact with the under- 
graduates, particularly freshmen and sophomores. The belief that sound instruction is largely 
individual is determining in so far as is possible the policy of undergraduate teaching. In- 
structors who are Ifaclicrs and who, because of their train' ng and interest are fitted for this 
work, are being placed in charge. Every effort is being made to add teachers who have thor- 
ough academic training, with special emphasis on their ability to understand students as 
individuals and to give them the urge of sympathetic and understanding guidance in their work. 
The entire policy aims at thoroughness of instruction by administering to as many individual 
differences and needs as possible. To stimulate and direct students through proper class;fica- 
tion and a study of individual needs under the leadership of tfacliers is. in brief, the aim of the 
College in its striving to use wisely the great benefaction which is continually enlarging the 
scope of service in the advancement of education. 



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D.S" 



Tlie Classes 



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Second Year Law 



M. L. Allshouse Vandergrift, Penn. 

L. S. Blades Elizabeth City 



Sigma Chi 



\V. H. Branson 



nurhaiii 



Sigma Nu Phi 



P. H. Crawford Kinston 

Sigma Nu 

F. W. Davis Purham 

Sigma Nf Phi 

J. B. DuLA Lenoir 

L. B. HoLLOWELL Greenville, S. C. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Nu Phi 

F. W. MvERS Concord 

S. G. Sparger Greensboro 

Sigma Nl Phi 

J. E. Thompson Hallsboro 

Lambda Chi Ali-ha, Sigma Nu Phi 

J. C. Whisnant Henrietta 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Nu Phi 



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First Year La-w 



J. S. Bell Charlotte 

E. J. Burns Carthage 

L. C. Butler Durham 

A. B. Carter Mt. Airy 

L. V. Chappell Elizabeth City 

J. E. COLETRANE Siler City 

V. B. Derrickson New Bern 

W. A. Finch Wilson 

N. T. Fletcher Gibson 

G. T. Garrett Rockingham 

G. S. Garriss Margarettsville 

W. I. Catling Norfolk, Va. 

M. W. Guthrie Durham 

S. M. HoLTON Cooleemee 

V. O. Jones Weaverville 



B. M. Linney Boone 

L. R. Morris Atlantic 

L. E. Nail Winston-Salem 

J. A. NoRRis Ft. Pierce, Fla. 

E. T. Saunders Shreveport, La. 

A. B. Shepherd Hendersonville 

J. M. Sink Greensboro 

L. A. Smith Durham 

H. P. Strickland Dunn 

C. M. Swan .... Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. C. Troy Durham 

J. W. Wallace Statesville 

M. C. Wilson Asheville 

F. L. Wyche Roanoke Rapids 



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1 

Jeronio BariilKirt I'lwv.soli Bar.lirt A\'MnKu k "'.luilill H.'ilMit Cluii Law r<-ii.u 

The School oi Religion 

Edmund D. Soper, B.n., D.D Dian and I'nijrssur nj the History of Rrlujinn 

Pall Neff Garber, Ph.D Profissor of Cliunh History 

Bexneit Harvie Branscomb, M.A Projrssor oj A'l-v; Trstami nl 

Elbert Rlssell, PilD Pmjissnr oj Hibliial Inti-rpr,talinn 

Howard Marios' LeSourd, A.M I'rofissor oj Religious Eduralion 

James Cannon, III, A.M., Th.B., Th.M Ivey Frojessor oj Church Missions 

Allen' Howard Godbev, Ph.D Projessor oj Old Testament 

Frank S. Hick.vhn, Ph.D Professor oj Psyiholoi/y and Reliijious lidiKalinn 

Thh School 

R. L. Jerome, Pres., ■* B K . . Goldsboro, N. C. C. D. Barclift Durant's Neck, N. C. 

R. G. Dawson, T.-Prc.?., <I>B K . Greensboro, N. C. Emma M. Barrincer .... Norwood, N. C. 

C. P. Wom.^ck, S.'C-rrca/., XX . . Rogers, Ark. R. Rav Branton, O .i K . . . Hatbnrn, Miss. 

C. C. Herbert, Ex. Com., XT . Spartanburg, S.C. Adrl^n E. Brown Bynuin, N. C. 

M. W. Lawrence, Ex. Com. . . New Bern, N. C. Russell H. C'audii.i nurhain. N. ('. 

Archie E. Acev, 2*E . . . . Chatham, \'a, W. Y. Chen Piit^toii, I'a. 

Frank M. Barnhart Cremora, \'a. 

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msimizizsi 



THE CHANTICLEER 

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Hoggin Kjles 

William L. Clegg, T 
Leland V. Couch . 
Marcus E. Cunningh 
Harvey L. Davis . . 
dwight l. fouts . . 
John W. Frank . . 
Joseph E. Gkt . . 
Chas. S. (Jreene . . 
John A. Cuice, K A . 
L. \'ernon Harris . 
O. C. Holler, :s A E 
j. g. huggin . . . 
Thomas R. Jarrett 
Hugh H. Johnson . . 
Homer M. Keever . 
Walter R Kellev 
John V. Knight . . 
Earnest C. Kolb . . 
A. A KvLES . . . . 



Johnson 



Mayo 



K A . . Garner, N. C. 

. Coeburn, Va. 

AM . Favetteville, Ark. 

. Durham, N. C. 

. Durham, N C. 

Uwajima, Japan 

Wrcnisboro, Texas 

. Durham, N. C. 

. Con\vav, Ark. 

Elon College^ N. C. 

. Graham, N. C. 

. . Aiken, S. C. 

School field, V'a. 

. . . Zuni, Va. 

. Lewisville, N. C. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

. Durham, N. C. 

. Sumter, S. C. 

Mooresville, N. C. 



:• MoLarty Kelley Nease Kolb 

Amie Overton Mavo . , Durham, N. C. 
James B. McLarty, A :; * . Charlotte, N. C. 
jAME-3 W. MoFFETT . . . Davton, Tenn. 

E. H. Nease GibsonviUe, N. C. 

Fletcher Nelson, Z <!> E . . . Helena, Ark. 
E. G. Overton .... Burlington, N. C. 
J. G. Phillips .... Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Lawyer J. Rainey .... Durham, N. C. 
I. L. Roberts Patterson, N. C. 

D. T. Rowe Favetteville, Ark. 

Leon Russell, K A . . . West Helena, Ark. 
Louise Ses-soms . . Fuquay Springs, N. C. 
W. Frank Shell Rosston, Ark. 

E. R. Shuller Ozark, Ark. 

P. C. Southard .... Stokesdale, N. C. 

J. DoAN Stott Wendell, N. C. 

Lacy H. Thompson . . Haw River, N. C. 
A. C. Waggoner . . . Walkertown, N. C. 
W. E. Whitford, 2 n 2 . . Vanceboro, N. C. 




Nelson Soulhard Rowe 



Ru.ssoll, Stott 



Pessoms AVhitlord Shell 




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SENIORS 

From The End Of The Trail. Bv James Earl Eraser 



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Colors: Purple and White Emblem: Eagle 

Officers 

St'?iior Year 

J. C. BuRWELl., Jr President 

R. G. TuTTLE, Jr I'ice-President 

Kathrvn Warlick Secretary 

C. A. KiRKPATRiCK Treasurer 

Representeitii'e on Athletic Council 
R. B. Bruton 

Representatives on Student Council 
C. C. Weaver H. L. Hester J. C. Burwell, Jr. 

Junior Year 

A. P. Harris, Jr President 

W. S. Rogers rice-President 

Ellen Huckabee Secretary-Treasurer 

Representative on Athletic Council 
C. C. Weaver, Jr. 

Representatives on Student Council 
H. L. Hester C. C. Weaver, Jr. 

Sophomore Year 

J. N. Truesdale President 

Edith Parker Vice-President 

Dorothy Honeycutt Secretary-Treasurer 

Represctitaiii'e on Athletic Council 
C. C. Weaver, Jr. 

Representative on Student (Council 
T. S. Eanes 

Freshman Year 

H. L. Hester President 

A. P. Harris, Jr Vice-President 

Edith Parker Secretary-Treasurer 

Representative on Athletic Council 
J. H. McLean 



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Senior CI 



ass 



Ethel L. Aberxrth^- Fuquay Spririfjs, X. C. 

Why worry? The difhcult task is not achieved by worry, but by persistent, optimistir endeavor, 
according to Ethel's philosophy. Undaunted by the most intricate problems, Ethel attacks them 
and generally wins. For her, the first Duke student to receive her "sheepskin" in the new audi- 
torium, 'iS predicts great success as a librarian. ^ 



\Velborxe E. Alex.anuer 




Coniu-lly Siirings, N. C. 



Iiertord College (1, sA^e'i ''tary Ruthcrrord CulK-gt' Club (3). 

studies with atrearnestness that always brings results. He has taken his 



"Alex" pursues his studies with atf earnestness that always brings 
major work in German and has so th»)roughI> mistered tlie language that he reads his favorite 
author, Goethe, with pleasure. No matter what he attempts after leaving Duke, we are sure 
of his success. 



Theodore W. Atwoou . 



Durham, N". C 



Iota Gamma Pi: Chomiatry Club; Swimming Team (3. 4); M.-inager (3). 

"Ted" is one of those queer people who delight in whiling away many a precious hour in a 
chemistry laboratory. He takes great delight in performing all of the odious, or should be say 
"odorous" tasks that the chemist runs up against. Such characteristics as Ted's make success a 
foregone conclusion. 



William Edwix Austin 



Band (1, 




Diirlia 



N. C. 



Di-'lta Upsilon Beta: Durham ffigh School Club; Interfraternlty Basketball (3); 
Class FootbaU and Basketball (2). 



Should we call him Falstaff or Prince Hal? Eddie combines so many of the qualities of each 
that we are inclined to think of him as the concrete realization of "Or. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." 
Extremely versatile, he can take a fling at social life, and "cram" for that "iiuiz" all in the 
same night. Just another paradox! 



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)enior 



CI 



ass 



Roy James Barnwell Hendersonville, N. C. 

Barnwell is a steady, hard working student, and'^one of the most faithful members of the Minis- 
terial Association. His fellowship is indeed enjoyable, and we regret that his living off the 
campus has prevented our being with him more. Harinvell is sure to be successful in his chosen 
work of the Methodist ministry. 



Wilbur Morris Beasley .... 

Columbian Literary Si 




Education Club. 



Apex, N. C. 



One must be intimately acquainted with Beasley before one can understand and appreciate him. 
His attitude is never presumptions or overbearing, and he is always persistent in his views and 
consistent in his endeavors. His personality, good nature, and insight in themselves write a 
destiny — unlimited success in future life, ^o^ 



Charles Glenn Bennett 




Durham, N. C. 



Freshman Football, Basketball, Baseball, and Tra.l;; Varsity Wdbtball (2, 3, 4), Captain (4); Basket- 
ball (2, 3): Track (2, 3); Tombs; Varsity Club; Red Friars. 

There is nothing in a personality which is to be more highly admired than strength of per- 
sistence, determination, and pluck. "Cocky" is the very embodiment of these qualities. On the 
football field, in his work, and in his personal relationships "Cocky" is characterized by straight- 
forwardness and dominance of spirit. iC"N^iJ 

Harry Israel Berlin .\^ Charlotte, N. C. 

e A * ^^ 

Hesperian Literary Society: rente; Taiirians. 

To know Harry is to like him. He has rightly gained a place in the affections of his acquaint- 
ances. In him we find all of those qualities that become a man, and in him we see a man whose 
sincerity, good nature, and insight in themselves write a future. 



34 



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the_chanth:leer IsmgisisIsisTl 




Senior Class 



Lymax Henry Bishop Durham, N. C. 

n K * 

Beta Omega Sigma; Frei^liiiiari Track; Pau-Hc-lli-nic Colllicil; Durham High Sctiool Club. 

Although "Bish" lives out iu town, he lias become well known because he spends most of his 
time on the campus. One can trutlifnlly say that he is the most popular to\Mi student of his set. 
His ambitions are unknown to us, hut we expect hiin to become an eminent ;ilumiuis. 



H.ARRY Lee Bivens . . . 



A A, OAK 



Monroe, N. C. 



Tombs; Advertising Manager "Chroulrli^" \,'A): Business M:ul^^. r "Clironiole" (1); .Vssistant Man- 
ager Basketball y2, 3); Manager lijiRkftbaU (i'> : luti r-S'^ri. t\ Debate (2); Columbian L,iterary 
Society. Kff^ri'lai y-Treasurer t2i; l;.d l-rtars. 

Whenever we think of Bivens, we think of the "Chronicle," as the two have become inseparable. 
In addition to managing this publication and managing the basketball team, he finds plenty of 
time to be sociable, and no "bull sev^ion" i- nuiiplett without Harry. He is truly a versatile man. 



Margaret Clarke I5i.ack\ve 



Wol 




Waynesville, N. C. 



During her last year at Duke, Margaret has" ^negT^cted her friends for more interesting asso- 
ciations. There are few afternoons or evenings when she is not engaged by a t:ill indi\'idual 
in an Oakland roadster. Her brief stays in Southgate, however, have proved her to be a 
generous friend and a charming companion. 



Verona Blalock 




Willow Springs, N. C. 



Y. W. C. A.; Brooks Literary Society (1); Wom^n'a lit'ague of Voters; Forum, President (2): Physics 
Club (2); Class Basketball (1, 2, 3); WomeD's Singles Tennis Champion. '27; Garden Club. 

Although \'erona entered Duke with the Class of '29, she is graduating this year, and with a 
brilliant record, too. Whatever she undertakes, Verona docs well, and we wish for our tennis 
champion that her success in college may be but an earnest of all the good things to come. 

1 
O 

35 



IfBfBJHfaJHJHJa 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 Q2d . 



asTsismsTSTJ 




Senior CI 



ass 



Pearl Boggs Statesville, N C. 

Mitchfit College (1. 2); Forum (3): Fren(?h Club (5^ 4); League of Women Voters. Chairman of Pro- 
gram Committee (4): Y. W. C. A. (3, 4); Braxton Craven Education Association, Secretary (4), 

Pearl has a certain quality which is sadly lacking in the modern girl. As Shakespeare says, 
"Her voice was ever soft and sweet, an excellent thing in woman." Everybody admires Pearl 
for her constant cheerfulness; she will be sadly missed next year by the girls in the "Shack." 



Charles Phillips Bowles . 

Guilford College (1, 2); Sophomore 
Chaplin (4): Ministt'rial Association 




Guilford College, N. C. 

Ts ?— Gotliwyo^n Litrt'ary Society. Executive Committee (3). 
VIci-rrcsident (4), President (4); Hades Club; Inter-Society 
Debate (4J ; 901S. 



"Charlie" is characterized by his consistent industry and brilliancy of mind. His devotion to 
duty, his sincerity in application, and his innate abilities are qualities of sterling value. High 
standards of scholarship, in the face of handicaps, are sufficient evidence that "C. P." is a man 
who will be of great service to his fellpvjs. 



Kenneth Arthur BRADSHER\\w^^/jf.jy j AS— ^f . 

"Kid" is one of the best known of the "Old Trinity Doys in our class. He has neglected hia 
studies to engage in the social life around him a few times, but his college record and his host 
of friends both testify to his desirability as a fellow student and a friend. 



Hurdle Mills, N. C. 



IVIamie Bridgers 



'm^' 



Conway, N. C. 



Women's Student Council. Proctor (3), Vice-President (4); Brooks Literary Society (1, 2); League 
of Women Voters (3, 4); Sand-Fiddlers' Club; Y. W. C. A.; Chairman of Engagement Committee; 

Junior Big Sisters: White Duchy. 

In her quiet, unassuming way Mamie carries her honors with a calm dignity. She has a smile 
for everyone, and during her four years here has won a host of friends who have the utmost 
esteem for her. She has a pleasing personality, a brilliant intellect, and a sympathetic nature. 

1 



36 



IrHfHfHfH/araJz 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 £>2d > 



5151515151EIEI 



TT 




Senior CI 



ass 



Philip I. Brisgai.skv Clu-lsca, Mass. 

"Bris'' halls frnin Chelsea, and since his entrance into our class he has aciinired a number of loyal 
friends. His ready wit, his willingiiess to help others, ami his general f;ood dispos'tioti make him 
welcome upon all occasions, including bull sessions and athletic contests. He is also an excellent 
scholar. 



"i'ETT.^ De.'\ne Brock 




Maysvillc, X. C. 



Yetta gave up N. C. C. W. and came to Duke to join the class of '28, which now would seem 
incomplete without her. Calmly she goes about t«r work, never failing to accomplish whatever 
she undertakes. If determinaticui be the key to success, then we may expect to hear great things 
from Yetta in the future. 



Faxn'ie Elizabeth Brogd 




D, 



\. C. 



Fannie is intelligent enough to be a good student and a jolly companion also. We wish that 
Duke could have more such splendid material from Durham High. She is always ready for 
fun. Fannie is a select favorite in the French department, where she is highly esteemed by 
profs and classmates. r^ 




JoHV A. Brothers .T^.l/.V^ Elizabeth City, N. C. 



Track Team (1): roIumhi.Tn Literary Sorioty, "Miirelinl (2). Executive Committee (3>, Secretary and 
Chairman of Lf-fl Wins (4), Prc.'ii.loiit (4); Sandtlddlers' Club (1. 2, S, 4). 

John is very studious and i^ always employing time which most of us idle away. He has been 
able, however, to mingle with the students and at the same time to make grades which put to 
shame man\' of us who are less ambitious. \Vhate\'er he does, he is sure to do well, 

y 



37 




irajHjarajHiam 



THE CHANTICLEER 

1 9 2d > 



51515151515151 




Senior CI 



ass 



Robert Bradley Bruton Candor, N. C. 

K 2, AlK, A * r 

Tnmbs; Freshman Football. Baseball. Track: Gli?«, 'club (1. 3, 4); Varsity Football (2, 3); Varsity 
Basketball Squad (2. 3); Varsitjf Track (2, 3, 4); Varsity Club. 

The fastest dash man at Duke in many years is leaving us, and he will be missed by the entire 
campus, for he was active in every phase of college life. Bob's tact, his gentlemanliness, his 
good fellowship, and his Christian character are joined to assure us of a successful future for him. 



James Charlie Horton BuRcm 



Durham, N. C. 



Hesperian fTitorary E^ociet'y":" Classiral CU\h (2). 



J. C. H. resides in the Durham downtown district and applies himself so thoroughly to hard 
work that, except for classes, the campus is rarely honored with his presence. Burch has found 
time, however, to build up for himself quite a "rep" in _^Dr. Brown's English department. His 
entire school record is most creditable. 

Hilda Long Burnette . . f //^^^v^^^^^^^y^ H Tarboro, N. C. 

Adelphian Literary Society; North Carolina CoIleg-<%'"li.r 'Woinen (1, 2, 3); Assistant in Library (4): 

Physic."; (;iul. (,1), 

Hilda has been with us only one year, but in this time she has made a place for herself in the 
hearts of many science students and professors. She possesses all the qualities of a sincere and 
true friend, and \ve feel sure that success awaits her. ) 

Ll'Cy Perr\' Bi'RT Loui'sburg, N. C. 

K A II 

T. W. C. A.; Treasurer of Forum. '27; Vice-lYetirlc iit nf Forum. '2S; Louisburg College (1, 2). 

Good-natured and with her jolly spirit always in ev;dence, except perhaps when she is mourning 
some English 3 quiz, Lucy is just the one to have around. Ever dependable, she is frequently 
called upon to accomplish the little tasks which others too easily refuse. Is there any wonder 
that she'll be missed? 

V 



38 



IrafEJEjajHfaia 



THE CHANTICLEER 

1 012S > 



51515151S15151 





^ 1?^ 




Senior CI 



ass 



JoHX C. Ik R\\ in,L, Jr Wanciitoii, X. C. 

n K *, OAK, A * r 

Class President (4); Student Council (4); ClieniistVy Club; Biology Club; Swimming Squad (2, 3); 
Gleo Club (1. 2, 3. 4); Band (1. 2. 3. 4); Orchestra- (1. 2); Student Volunteer Board: Freshman Foot- 
ball; Hesperian Literary Society, President (4); Cosmopolitan Club; Beta Cmesa Sigma; Delta 

Upslloil Beta. 

Behold a man of true worth! John has heen ronnecteil with many hranches of campus activity 
and has excelled in all of them. His deep hass voice has thrilled many an audience, and his 
executive ability is of the finest. True, loyal and sincere, John is a typical Southern gentleman. 



Cl-.ARENCE RaV C.ARPnXTHR 



IUTl\\lllC, 



\. c. 



OIK, T K A 



Weaver College (1. 2); Tombs; Presiaetn \ . i\ i • \. 
(4); Taurian Players; Columbian Llter;ir\ Snnir-iy. 
Bucknell-Duke Debate (3); Emory-Florlda-DukQ Dc !■: 



> it:ny Board of Directors T. M. C. A. 
pii'IiMlilan Club; Inter-Society Debate (3); 
iS>; Cxliird-Duke Debate (4); Red Friars. 



Ray has accomplished many things in his two years at Duke. He has become popular and has 
climbed to a place of leadership on the campus. He stands out as a man of high ideals, and 
it is certain that the "Y" and the debating team will feel a great loss when he has gone. 



f^l . 



Wllllamston. \. C. 



Chi.tsicni Club; Tiiurijui Players; "Chronicle," Asso- 
. " \M.iiit. Kilitor (3), Killtor (4); Cat's Head Club. 



Bryant Hexxett Carstarphen . 

Si, il T, K All 

Hesperian Literal y Society; Soplioniore fTonoi-s; 
ciate Editor (3), Contributing Editor |4); ".\relii 

Bryant's catholic range of interest in modern anil experimental literary forms (e.g., Carl Van 
Vecliten or "Winity Fair"), the theater, and the "Archive" tells but half the story. With him 
conversation is an art, and camaraderie jnore than mere outward display of the spirit. Looking 
at Life, he sees beyond. 

Ella Zexa C.xrtwright . . 



W 



Fairfield. N. C. 



A compound! Of what? A wonderful mind that can capably be applied to everything, an 
interesting conversation full of wit that delights all who participate in it, an amiable and kind 
disposition which is shown to all. Such a coinpi>un(l did the (Jrent Chemist compose in the 
personality of Ella Zena. 



39 



IrsjEJEJzmmm 



THE CHANTICLEER 

1 9 2d > 




Senior Class 



Helen Deane Chandler Gastonia, N. C. 

* B K, I X A * 

Freshman Honors; Y. W. C. A. (2); Sophomore iibnors; Women's Glee Club (2, 3); Editorial start 

"Chronicle" (2. 3); Co-od Editor "Chronicle" (4); EUo-L (3); Student Council; Proctor (2, 2); Council 

on Student Publications, Secretary (4); French Club (4). 

Much poise and precision veil Helen's fascinating self from the rabble. But the favored few 
congratulate themselves upon an acquaintance that is charming. Helen's hospitable spirit wel- 
comes the liUfrati to her room for lengthy noctunrai sessions, and she is best remembered as 
dealing coffee and sparkling conversatioa 4o the chosen number. 



LiLLLAN Alice Chandler 



.^^. .... 

* B K p 

Honors (1. 2); Eko-L (2) 



Moriisville, N. C. 



Perseverance is an asset which secures for us our goals. Lillian has proved that steady college 

work gains its reward in the enviable Phi Beta Kappa key. Quiet, resourceful, one who can 

always be trusted, Lillian will go out from college into the education world to lead others on 
to a higher level. 



Minnie Chandler 



Durham, N. C. 



Persistence characterizes Minnie. Her achievements thus far are of true worth because she 
knows the value of conscientious effort spent toward a desired goal. Ability to make friends 
is a gift which Minnie uses to advantage, as the host of friends which she leaves behind her 
testifies. 



Nellie Elizabeth Christian 



'mn^ 



Durham, N. C. 



Y. W. C. A.; Town Girls' Association. 



Once known and loved, never forgotten. Nellie is a general favorite with all of her countless 
friends. No matter what happens, she is still the same smiling, daintily dressed girl whose soft 
voice and charming individuality win you immediately. No wonder that one gentleman in par- 
ticular appreciates the company of this fair, petite classmate of our. 



40 



IfHfHJHrafEfaja 



THE^HANTl^CLEER ISmSlSlflSlgH 




Senior CI 



ass 



Harris Alexander Coffin Asheboro, N. C. 

AS* 

Beta Omega Sigma; Assistant Trael^ Manager (1. 1); Assistant Manager of "AreJiive" (2); Hesperian 

Literal > S'ii i,t\. 

Without being cotiscious of it, "Harris" leads an idyllic life, and still he has the happy ability 
to turn ^vays and means to his o\vn ends. Hut that is not all. Hack of his cutting blue eyes 
and his ver\' blond hair is, in reserve, the essence of real business acumen. 



Otho Thomas Colclough 




,9/ 



Gamma Pi, 




.... Diuh;mi, X. C. 



Otho forms a third of this year's electrKfal ensineering class. Being a hard and conscientious 
worker, he is one of the three left of the large class that started four years ago. The hoiiors 
he has received will also vouch for his ability. He is a model student, a loyal friend, and 
a gentleman. 



C. C. Cole 



mj^m 



Durham, .\. C. 



Industrious, intelligent, and courteous — these are the adjectives that characterize Cole. French 
is his hobby — when in doubt about a passage in translation or a construction just consult him. 
He is a good student, a real friend, and a worthy asset to the Class of '28 and Duke. 



Thomas Rupert Coleman 



Walce Forest Opjlege (1, 2, 3). 



Lyons, N. C. 



Coleman came to us this year from Wake Forest, but he is a loyal Duke man. He is full of 
fun and an all-round good fellow. Though we have known him only a short while, we have 
already learned to think very highly of him. We wish him great success in the ministry. 



4« 



IrHfEJHfilJHJHJE 



THE CHANTICLEER 

« 1 Q2d ' 




Senior Class 



Mason Reece Corpening Lenoir, N. C. 

Reece possesses those traits which make him an ideal student and friend. His college career 
has been quite versatile, and he has succeeded in everything he has attempted. He is an athlete 
of no mean ability, as has been evidenced by his prowess in the boxing ring and on the gridiron. 



Albert Henry Cotton 



A X A,!S 



Durham, N. C. 



e A * 



Cat's Head Club; Contributing Editor •■Chronicle" (3, 4); Frature Editor "Chanticleer" (4); Assistant 

Editor "Archive" (3>. 

There is not an intellectual discussion or a social problem on the campus to which Albert 
has not. at one time or another, given his attention. Seeing all and hearing all, he registers 
a concrete, if not constant reactioiLjjii^ .yjjhal h^j^^ptUities increase rather than limit his 
perspectives. 



EvoLYN Herman Cranford, Jr 




Asheboro, N. C. 



; Varsity Club. 



Freshman Baseball;.'' y9rSY|r Ba^tiELlW2 

A leader among the boys of his fraternal order. Jack, slow to anger and of discriminating 
judgment, has been one of the most highly respected boys on the Duke campus. He is a gentle- 
man and an athlete. Could higher praise be given him? 

Robert Joshua Cranford ,^Vt^ Albemarle, N. C. 

A X A, Av#4^ 

Columbian Literary Society; Musical Clubs (1, 2. 3); Band (1. 2. 3); "Chronicle" Staff (1); Assistant 
Manager Basketball (1. 2, 3); Manager Freshman Basltetball 12); Classical Club (2); Delta 

Upsilou Beta. 

"Bob" has devoted his attention to many kinds of activity. He has added much to the Glee 
Club by his musical ability, and in the classroom he has proved himself an excellent student. 
He has not confined himself to these two fields, but has given much of his time to the wooing 
of the fairer sex. 

i 



42 



IrHfHJHfEiaHiH 



THEjCHANTI^CLEER [smSlSlJnSTinl 




Senior CI 



ass 



Margaret Elizabeth Craven 



Hahania, \. C. 



* B; K 



Y. W. C. A.; Hades Club: Durham High School Club; Freshman and Sophomore Honors; Eko-L; 
Le Cercle Francais, Treasun r C!!, Trogram Conimittie I4); Women's Student Assoc-latlon, Proctor 

(4) ; String Club (4). 

Lib is thrice-talented — musical ability, scholarship, and the art of being a gntnl Irltiul have made 
her envied by those less gifted. She is always ready to help or to join in the tun. We can 
depend on Lib, for she does not know the meaning of the word failure. 



Lethia Elizabeth Cross 



K^A'-'lt 



Despite the fact that she lives in town, LethI;' takes an unusual interest in campus activities. 
She is always dependable, and her grades are sutiicient proof of her ability as a student. If it 
were necessary to characterize Lethiq.ip one \yp.rd, we should say she personifies more than 
all else — congeniality. — ^ 



Theodore Alston Davis 




Panipliii, Va. 



T. M. C. A.; ran-HclIenic Council (2, 3, 4). 



Quiet and unassuming, "Greek's" perfect poker face masks a keen mind and a strong will. His 
dark eyes, feared and admired by every girl he meets, carry usually a soft, almost dreamy light, 
but when he is defending a fine principle in argument, or aiding his "brothers" in conflict, these 
eyes emit sparks. 



Laura Belle Deaton 




V Racfonl, N. C. 



White Duchy; Secretary ^tlident Government (4). 



<fc(* 



Nothing clouds the beauty of Laura's ideals, a,gcf jP>pe achievement leads only to another. Great- 
ness, according to her philosophy, consists in giving one's life to the needs of humanity. We 
are confident that all of her future activities will only add to her ever-increasing nobility of soul. 

V 



43 



rajHjarajEjaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

■ • 1 Q2a ' 



51515151515151 




Senior CI 



ass 



William Caswell Drake Macon, N. C. 

"Cas" is not too serious and not too gay; he believes in the happy medium. An interest here 
and at another place has occupied much of his time in the past few years. He is a seeker after 
romance rather than knowledge, but he has been able to give his attention to both. 



Florence Margaret Draughon 



z t'a' 



u 



Whitakers, N. C. 



Class Represeatntlve (3)^ 



Margaret possesses one of the most attractive and yet mysterious personalities imaginable. Her 
attUude toward everyone is characterized by the utmost consideration and deference, and her 
popularity with the girls at Southgate attests to her true worth. As for the members of the 
opposite sex — well, the number whom she can call her own speak for themselves. 

Millard Charles Dunn ^!p\lii Charlotte, N. C. 

President Stuilent Volunteer Group (3); Ministerial ASBo^l^iOn (3, 4); Rutherford College (1. 2). 

Dunn came to Duke from Rutherford College with an exceptionally good record as an athlete and 
student. He has taken ([uite an active interest in the work of the volunteer group, and he 
intends to offer his services as a medical missionary. His devotion to this calKng assures us 
of his success. 



Thomas Shell Eanes, Jr. 



Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; Y. M. C. A. Cabi 

ball 




Lexington, N. C. 



omore Student Couneil Representative; Foot- 
3). 



Tom Eanes, whose curly locks and friendl>' smile, along with his stellar work on the gridiron 
have broken the hearts of many co-eds and won our respect and admiration, is a man who can 
be relied upon at all times. A great asset to the Class of '28! 

y 



44 



IfHfEfErararajE 



THE CHANTICLEER 



1 OI2d 



5T515151S15T5T| 




Senior Class 
Ir.ma Eumoxsom Charlotte, N. C. 

St. Mary's School (1. 2); Glee Club (4); Class lAskctball; Tilnity Historical Society: Y. W. C. A. 

If one has the "blues," Irma's roniii l^ the place ti) '^o, for she seems to possess some sort of 
magical charm by uhich ■blues" are <H^pelle(^ instantl\. Her (|vii(k \v!t ami readv smile have 
made for her a great many friends durini' her sta\ at nuke. 



Christixr Dixox EinvARiis 

I.ouisburg Collesc (1. 2); V. W. '. 



M^ 



A. I'l'i^rani CoTnniittec i: 
,Mtf Dianiatic Oluii. 



.... IlnokcrtOll, \. C. 
n; W.inlairs Glc. Club (3, 4); .Soulh- 



Musical? Yes. And willing in let others enjoy it. Christine answers whenever she is called 
upon, whether it he to play for "V,'' vespers, or tor dancing '.n the social room. Her charm- 
ing personality has made her one cil the laxoiit^^ at Southgate, and she will be greatly missed 
next vear. 



E.\RL HdWi.ixGs Edwards 




Di 



im, \. C. 



Edwards is always ready and willing to 'liroi^^VdeMjJs Homer and participate in a discussion 
of philosophy, take in the mov:es, or walk a mile to get a "dope" at midnight. He is persistent 
in his efforts to do things, as is showii b^: hi.s fervent attempts to "Carry Lina Avenoo" his way. 




EiGEXE Wahab Edwards .... ^yCC^ Belhavc-n. X. C. 

Eugene has made the most of his college life ill every respect. He is an excellent student, and 
can "bull" his way through any course. Witn the fairer sex he i» termed by some as a "devil." 
The host of friends he leaves beh'nd attests to his popularity. 

r 
o 



4S 



ifHJHJHrafEfaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 9 2S • 




Senior Class 



George Roy Elmore Lowell, N. C. 

Freshman Fo<itljall Squad; Freshman WieslHng; Varsity Wrestling (2. 3. 4); Varsity Club. 

Behold a conscientious %vorl<er! Few of us can forget his splendid performances on the "mat," 
and still fewer who have attended classes with him can forget his consistent work on his "Ec" 
courses. George has, in addition, independently worked his way through school. Soon his 
appear \vlth the lettering; "G. R. Elmore, C. P. A." 



"shingle" wi 



J':^/^ ^'"°'''' ^- ^- 



Alvan Bush Enos .... 

Hesperian Literary Society. Secretary (3), Critic (4). 

Personality, honor, modesty, and the ability to make and keep friends are among Bush's chief 
characteristics. He is clean through and through, and well deserves the description he is often 
given, "A prince of a fellow." With his keen intellect and oratorical ability. Bush is certain 
to make a success in whatever he undertakes. 



Paul R. Ervin 




Charlotte, N. C. 



Columbian Literary Society, Secretary (,2). Treasurer (S), Pre.sident (4); Tennis Team (2, 3. 4); 
Wrestling Team (3. 4); Inter-Society Debate (2): Duke-Pittsburg Debate; Duke-Swarthmore De- 
bate; Duke-Oxford Debate; Duke-George Washington Debate: Duke-Emory Debate; Member Debate 
Council; "Chronicle" Board; Historical Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Robert Spencer Bell Prize (2); 

Freshman Debater's Medal. 

Paul is one of the most versatile members of the senior class. He is a good student, a brilliant 
and forceful speaker, and an athlete of considerable ability. His ability as a speaker will be 
especially valuable to him in his chosen profession of the law, and we expect great things of him. 




Durham, N. C. 



), Captain (4); Duke Records in 100-Yard 
'dies; Varsity Club; Biology Club. 



William Howard Ervin . . ■. 

Tombs; Freshman Football; Varsity Track C 

Dash, 220-Yard Dash, 220-Yard LoW( 

"Bud" is everybody's friend, a sturdy student, and an exceptional track man. This wing-footed 
athlete has broken many records. Even under disheartening handicaps Bud can always be de- 
pended upon to break the tape. We expect him to run the race of life as he does the limed lanes 
of the century dash. 

1 



46 



irafEjarajHfaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 



I o:2tt 



51515T51515T5]] 




Senior CI 



ass 



Charles B. Falls, Jr Kings Mountain, N. C. 

A 2 * 

Assistant Manager of Basketball (2>; Hfsperiansi/lterary Society: Rutherford College Club; Cleve- 
land County Club; Editorljll Staff •■Chanticleer" (3). 

Charlie has easily overcome the difficulty or 'ertfcrifig a school in one's second year. lie now 
stands out as a well-known and well-liked senior. He impresses us with his strong personality, 
and we regret the loss of this man who possesses all the qualities of a true friend and a South- 
ern gentleman. 

Durham, N. C. 




(3); "Chantieloer" Art Staff, 



WiLLLAM BeATTV FaRR, |r. . J^^V-^^VAV 

Presbyterian College of .South CarolnC>|l, 2): South CarrflSalciub 

^ ■ Art Editor ii). ^ ■' 

"Speedy" came to us last year from Preshyterian College of South Carolina anil immediately 
became a loyal son of Duke. His work as an artist is brilliant, as may be seen in many places 
in this book. Whether he works or plays, he does it with a viin that spells success. 

ViOLETTE WlXFIELD FaicETTE . ^iSy^f/^^V ) Dillhani, N. C. 

K A 

N. C. C. W. (1); Durham Hi^-h S.lir.nl riul, ( j. ;: ) ; Woman's CI..- Club (2, 3. 4); Biology Club (3); 
String Instrument Club (2, 3. 4); .May Court f4); Taurian Players 13, 4); Nu Sigma. 

Beneath a happy, amiable, carefree air and a broad, joyous smile, with a generous disposition 
and whole-hearted impetuos'ty, \'iolette carries a nature that can be as serious as her loyalty 
to her friends is deep. She is not only scientific, but generously contributes her musical ability 
to the Glee Club. 



Fraxk Alfred Finley ';'.^'. '! Asheville, N. C. 

n K A 

Football Team (1); Track Team (1); Track .Squad (2. 3): Glee Club (3, 4); Beta Omega Sigma. 

"Buzz," as he is known to us. early proved that he was not only capable but dependable. Con- 
sequently he has borne the burden of many a worth >vhilc move fostered by the various organiza- 
tions to which he belongs. We of '28 associate his name most pleasantly with the Junior Prom. 



IfHfEjarajHjam 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 9 2S • 



51515151S151I1 




Senior CI 



ass 



Robert Corpexing Fixley Asheville, N. C. 

n K A 

Football (1. 2. 3); Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; Glea I'liib (1. 2, 3); Orchestra (1, 2. 3), Leader <3). 

"Bob" is known not only as a football player but also as an indispensable member of the orches- 
tras that have held sway here during his stay. Due to various reasons, he finishes with us rather 
than with '27, his original class. A gain foj^^'j^,^^ lojs for '27. 



William Carltox Floyd 




It, N. C. 



Circulation Manager "Chronlcl,..-' (31; Fraternily nnskotball (3); Physics Club. 

A true sport! That's what all of Carlton's associates wntiM proclaim about him. In spite of 
his love for a good time '.n general, he has done well in his scholastic work. His common sense, 
combined with his ability, ought to make him one of the most influential business men of the state. 



Alfred M. Franko . . 

^010; New Yni-k TTiiivcr.sity (IJ; l-'ieshma 



n Fnotua 



, . . Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

loniore Honoi-s; Junior S"holar.ship. 



Franko hails from the great metropolis, hut he has easily adjusted himself to our environinent 
and has become one of us. He has an uncanny ability for "getting by" his history professor 
with extremely high grades, and is also very useful in the well-known college "bull feasts." 




William Guthrie Frasier, Jr. . . /^4kA^ Durham, N. C. 



Beta Omega Sigma 



"Little Willie" is a man who has, without doubt, made a "big impression" in the minds of his 
fellow students. We'll admit he has had a very hard time staying awake in Dr. Cranford's 
philosophy class, but we admire him for doing SO; Surely, Bill is a man of sterling worth. 



48 



IfirajafHJHraral ig^HANjicLEER ismsTsisisTsu 




Senior CI 



ass 



George V.axce Fi li>, Jr Kc-nicrsvillc, X. C. 

X T 

Assistant Wrestling Manai^or (1. 2, 3): Wrestling Manager (4); Hesperian IJtei-ary Society; Historical 

Society. 

"A man of true worth" ;s the best phrase that could be used to ilesrribe Gcorse Fulp. Annual 
write-ups are inclined to be exaggerated, but in this simple statement about one who has shown 
such abilities, there is not the slightest particle of flattery. To know CJeorge is the sole veri- 
fication of this truth. 



Kfx Ett.\ Fi_ lton 



Iii.l 



X A *, e A * 



(■piMldl'llCC 



Va. 



Taurian Players, Chairman Costunni fjoaimitlce (4); "C'lironi. U ■ .Staff; Class Basketball (2. 3): 
Biology Club, Secretary (3); Chemislry Club. Seiretary i3): V. W. C. A.: World Fellowship Com- 
mittee; Women's Student Government. Assoeiation, rroctor (41; Delta Phi Klio .\Ipha: Nu Sigma: 

White Duehy. 

Ken Etta has distinguished herself in various fields of activity. She is a hard worker with the 
Taurians and is e<|ually efficient in Delta Phi Rho Alpha. Srholastically, Ken Etta has set Sr\ 
enviable record in science, as can be seen from her list of honors. 



Nellie G.arrard 



Taurian Club (1. 2. 3. 



Diiiliam, N. C. 



Nellie personifies good nature and geniality. Her residence in town has noi pri-\ciited her from 
knowing many of the students and claiiniiig them all as her friends I'.xact in her work, thought- 
ful and sincere with her friends, Nellie will always represent to us a high type of university 



'W^' 



Martin Thompson Garren Hendersonville, N. C. 



Tombs; Assistant JIanager Ki>otinill (1. 

Manager "f'hroniele' 



3): Manager Varsity Fnrdhall (I); .Assistant Business 



(U 



3); Historical Club. 



Here's one of the most loyal members of our class. His record as a worker, a student, and a 
supporter has made lor him a great number of friends. He is well-knoun tor his frankness, 
his independent attitude, and his sincerity, and these traits will make happiness and success for him. 

y 



49 



irHJEjarajafaia 



THE CHANTICLEER 
• 1 &2& « 



515151515151S1 




Senior CI 



ass 



Mary E. Glasson Durham, N. C. 

z T A, e A *, * 2, K A n 

Biology Club; Taurian Players; Y. W. C. A.; Town Girls' Association. 

In Mary we have that curious combination of a very feminine scientist with a flair for the 
dramatic. Mary is a contradiction in terms, but a good one at that. She is quiet in that de- 
ightful sort of wav that makes the ring of her laughter all the more welcome. 



Harold Leon Goldberg 




i"s?hooi crffBr 



Durham, N. C. 



Harry is Efficiency personified. He has the executive mind and is all business and figures. But 
he is exceedingly human "for a' that," and his efficiency does not lead to coolness or aloofness, 
nor his automatic precision to dullness. In his few leisure moments he reveals one of the warm- 
est natures imaginable. 



Richard Hobart Goldwin 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 



New York University (1, 2); Track Team at New York University; Sophomore Honors at Duke; 

Hesperian Literary Society. 

After having given New York University and Duke a two-year tryout, Dick says that he much 
prefers Duke and the "Sunny South." He is reserved in nature, a hard worker, an excellent 
companion, and possesses many other good qualities which we expect to hear from in the future. 



Nancy Ida Grady 




Asheville, N. C. 



Oxford College (1); Secretary-Treasurer Y. W. C(4*. (2); Historical Society; Vice-President League 

of Women Voters (4). 

Ida is dignified; there is no denying this, but those of us who know her find that she likes fun 
and a good time as well as anyone, and that the real Ida is full of humor. Her grades prove 
that she takes her work seriously, and is an excellent student. 

V 



so 



IrHfEjaraiaiaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 012d • 



S1515151515151 




Senior CI 



ass 



MixxiE Spencer Grant Duihani, N. C. 

I^ouisburs College (1). 

Full of fun, a good sport, yet reserved — that's Minuie. Those of us who have the privileKc of 
knowing her intimately see beyond the sternness and dignity of those dark hrowii eyes and 
consider her to be a generous, influential person \\ itii a strong character and a winning personality. 



Bruce H. Greene 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Bast-ball (2. 3. 4); Football (2. 3). 



"Willie" Greene, one of our most versatile men — a star on the diamond, a "sheik" with the 
ladies, and a good student. "Willie" has won a place in our hearts which can never he tilled 
by another. When he has gone to India, his absence will he greatly felt by all of us. 



ZuL.A M.AYE Greene 




Roxb 



oxDoro, 



N. C. 



Vivacious! That is "Zu." After knowing her we can account for her numerous friends. She 
has a super-abundance of pep and a generous amount of wit and humor. In spite of the fact 
that she had to miss classes for more than a month on account of illness, her grades were the 
envy of most of us. 

Mabel Jeannette Griffin 



'z2\yi^ 



Durham, N. C. 



* B K 



Honor Roll (1. 2); Town Girls' Asso. iatioii. I're.sidi'nt (4); Matheniatiis Club. 

Mabel can well be called the "mathematician" of her class. She has beautiful red hair, but she 
can easily control her temper. Her ideas are very unusual, and in evervthing Mabel is energetic, 
putting her ver>" heart into her work. Mabel certainly knows how to take "g\ni," and is an 
excellent acrobat. 

r 



IrHfEjaiHfHrara 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 9 2S • 




Senior CI 



ass 



Charles E. Hamilton, Jr Monroe, N. C 



A T iJ, T K A 



Hesperian Literary Society. Marshal (2); Taurjan Players. 
: msioricai society (:l); '■Chanticleer" Staff (31; Inter-Society Debate (21; 
nd Lee, Swathniore. and Florida Debates; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



Freshman Baseball and Football Squads: . . 
Cast of "Pierre Patelin"'; Historical Society (:l); 
Washington and 

vays pleasant, ever prepared to chat — or argue, he is known to everyone as a well-rounded 
Scholasticallv, athlcticallv, or — :-ii- .•_..t.._i., .-.. ^u ^ ._»... r^\ — 1:_ ._i_ 



socially — partxiilarly in the latter — Charlie can take care 



Ah 

of himself. Among other things, he is a ,gif ted debater ^and student of human nature. 

E n >^ 



William Thomas Hamlin ^ Durham, N. C. 



Freshman Track; Varsity Track (2. 
Varsity Club (2, 3); Ho 



n 

I'urlumi High School Club; Hesperian Literary Society; 
of Cniversity HiKh Hurdle Record (1926). 



Bill is one of those men whom everybody likes and whose friendship is coveted. He is witty, 
shrewd, merry, and particularly adept in the art of gracefully clearing the high hurdles. In 
life, just as on the track, "Ham" will hurdle the difficulties and make time on the open spaces. 

Alfred Franklin Hammond, Jr PoUocksville, N. C. 

* B K 

9019; Freshman and Sophomore Honors; Chemistrj- Club; Biology Club; Columbian Literary Society; 

Iota Gamma Pi, 

"Hammond" is brilliant — very brilliant — but even that is inadequate in explaining the tre- 
mendous success he has made at Duke. His is what might be called a case of "applied bril- 
liance," for hard work and determined enthusiasm in his activities have supplemented his keen- 
ness of intellect. These traits point to an illustrious career in the field of medicine. 

Guy Taylor Hardee Ayclen, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Historical Society; Associate Member Taurians. 

Guy has spent four very profitable years at Duke, not only for himself, but for those with whom 
he has come in contact. We will always remember him as a man who has ability, a sense of 
humor, a pleasing disposition, and all the other i|ualities which make a gentleman. 



52 



irajHiHiHrama 



THE CHANTICLEER 
> 1 o 12 a > 



515151515151511 



T 




Senior CI 



ass 



Lawrence Legare Hardin, Jr. 



Clover, S. C. 



n 2 



Wofford College (1»: South Carolirta <_'lub; Sopholmie Honors; Junior Srholarship ; Iota Gamma Pi; 
yOl9; Physics Assistant (:i); Taurian Players i :;, li. .M<-inber Duke University Bran.-h of American 

Institute Elriiri'Ml i'-ngineers. 

L. L. is a true engineer! Thinif^h reserved, he li:ts made friends with all with whom he has 

been associated. Hardin has that highly cnvetcil capacity for making excellent grades and at 

the same time for giving much attention to extra-curricula activities. His scientific ahility will 
carry him far in his career. 



Arthlr Parker Harris, Jr. 



-^ ~ h K A >*^ 



A\h 



ciiiiarlc, 



If, N. C. 



;i019; Manager of Cross Country TeaDi; Vice-President of Freshman Class; Presiilent of .Junior Class; 
Secretary-Treasurer of Greater Duke Club. 

.■\rthur is one of the most dependable men on the campus. His active interest in all branches 
of collegiate activities has made him an outstanding leader among us, and he has distinguished 
himself as one of the ablest men in our class. Such qualities as A. P. possesses make success 
inevitable. 

WiLLiAisi Albert Hart 



iif^rrr^) 



Easlcy, S. C. 

Intersoclety Debate (3); President Columbian Literary Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, chairman of 
Discussion Group Comniittee; "Weaver College Club. 

Hart came to Duke from Weaver College as a Junior. He is an exceptional student and has also 
participated in extra-curricula activities during his two years here. Whatever he undertakes 
to do, he does it conscientiously and thoroughly. His sincerity, congenial personality, and de- 
lightful conversation have gained for him man\ friends. 

Robert Lee H.atcher Wiiiston-Sak-m, N. C. 

A * r 

Freshman Football; Vai-sity Football Squad (2, 3;; Wrestling Squad (1. 2); Taurian Players (2, 3. 

4); Musical Clubs (2. 3. 4). Business Manager (4 1; Member Publications Board; Assistant Cheer 

Leader 13); Beta Omega Sigma; Varsity Club; Business Manager Souvenir Booklet. 

Funny Bob" Hatcher has shown us how to do things in a big fashion. Why should the Fates 
predestine him? His role is set. May he not be a "juggler of hearts" forever! Hob possesses 
amazing versatility and a serious side to his personality which commands the deep respect of all. 



53 



IrHJHJHIiJHfHJH 



THEJCHANTJCLEER |51515151SIS1S1 




Senior Class 



Walter Harold Hayes Durham, N. C. 



'•Clii-onicle" Staff (3): 



n E n 

Associate Editor and Alumni Editor "Chronicle" 
Society; Durham Hii;li Scliool Club. 



(4); Hesperian Literary 



Harold, the debonair young literary genitis, intend;- to continue his work in the study of English 
literature even after graduation. He is at present torn between newspaper work and teaching 
English. He has exhibited his qualifications for either_ of these fields in his work here. His 
ambition lives in Georgia. 



^Y/^ 



Ernest Lee Haywood .a^ Waxhaw, N. C 



jj^K A n, * B K^%«^ 



9019; Le Cercle Franc 



SophonioiX' and Freshman Honors. 



Haywood is a man who has conclusively proven that one can work his way through college and 
yet be a real scholar. He has made a high average in h!s studies and at the same time has made 
many friends. A man of his ability and earnestness deserves great credit. 

RuFus Marshall Helms Morehead City, N. C. 

Hesperian Literary Society; President Pli.\sies i_'liib. 

We know no one who has taken a more conscientious attitude towards his work than Marshall, 
and the fact that he entered our class when we were all freshmen, taught school one year, and 
is still able to graduate with us shows his ability to succeed. We predict a successful future. 

Hanselle Lindsay Hester Winston-Salem, N. C. 

* A e, * B K, O A K, T K A, XT 

9019; Student Council (3), "Vice-chairman (4): Editor "Chronicle"; Class President (1); President 

Hesperia (4); President North Carolina Collegiate Preasj Public Lecture Committee (2); Tracts; (1. 2); 

Classical Club; Debate Council (3); Inter-Society Debate; Duke-Swarthmore Debate; Duke-Florida 

Debate; Duke-State Debate; Duke-Goorge Washington Debate; Red Friars. 

Activity, activity, activity — the sound of this magic word is music in "Jerry's" ears. It must 
be admitted, however, that he has devoted his industry to winning substantial honors, and he 
is to be commended for his persistence and the success of his politics. He is a brilliant debater, 
scholar, and journalist. 

y 



5+ 



IrafHJsrajHjajz 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 £> Li a ■ 



smsisisigiST J 




Senior Class 



Thomas P'rederick Hewitt Kinston, X. C. 

Manager of Baseball (4): T. M, C. A. Cabinet (4); ■•Chronieli" Staff. Reporter (2). Assopiate Editor 

(3), Sports Erlltor I -1 ) : l)lll:i. 

Tommv's constant smile, ready \\\t, and cheery greetin;; will lie greatly niisseil im the campus 
when he becomes an alumnus. His smile might be described as omnipresent, and even the most 
adverse circumstances are unable to banish it. He is always ready and eager to lend a helping 
hand to his friends. 



Mildred Joxes Hixton 



M&^ 



Durhain, N. C. 



Spanish Club ^^^^: IHirhani High SchortI I'liib; Y. U'. ('. A. t '2 ) -. Braxton Craven Etlueation Asso- 
ciation (4). 

Mildred doesn't waste too much time on the campus, but she's a good, dependable pal all the 
same. . Apparently she is of a quiet and reserved manner, yet a look at those sparkling e>es and 
a word or two spoken are conclusive enough that she is fully alive and jolly. 

--S 



Isabel Yoi xg Hoev . . . 

N. C. C. W. (1. 2); Cleveland County Club 




Iprc'tary l"l: Trinity College Historical Society (4). 
ine must know her to appreciate her charming 



"Hoey" is different; that is all we can-.,... w . ,, „ 

personality which has won for her many true friends at Duke. We hope that she will always 

;i.d .EflKtinue to be happy. 



pcis(Miaiii\ \>iiicii itas \>iMi nil iici iii.i 

take life as calmly as she has her colle 



Alfred Tesse Holtox . 




Diirliani, \. C. 



Thinking of .'Alfred is synonymous with thinking of the musical clubs. He has given his best 
to the development of a strong musical organization here. Not only is he a musician, but a 
"racketeer" also, and he has greatly boosted Duke's standing among the tennis teams of the state. 



irajHjarajHfHJH 



THE CHANTICLEER 
• 19 2a > 



51515151515151' 




Senior CI 



ass 

Richard Caswell Horne Winston-Salem, N. C. 

A X A, T K A 

Intersociety Debate "(1) : Duke-Oxford Debate (3); Duke-Pittsburg Debate (2); Duke-Bucknell Debate 

(3); Freshman Football Squad; Assistant Manager "Chronicle" (1, 3); Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4); 

Duke-Davidson Debate (3); Duke-West Virginia Debate (4). 

Dick has sought to mingle in every phase of college life. Along with his other activities, he has 
proven his ability as a good student. His wit ami humor have been the delight of many "bull 
sessions." His efficiency in the "Mexican art" has already made him a "Pict" man. 

Robert Lee House \'^. V \ C\ Franklinton, N. C. 

Glee Club; Ministerial Association: Band; Columbian Literary Society. 

"House" is known on the campus as a true, conscientious student, and has the distinction of 
having graduated in three years. However, this does not signify that he is a one-sided phenom- 
enon who can do nothing but study. He has been active in the Glee Club and Ministerial 
Association, and has gained man\' friends. 



Rav Wei.don House 



Delta Upsilon Beta; Bal 




Coolemee, N. C. 



"Chanticleer" Staff (4). 



Ray is an example of the fellow who does not "shoot until he sees the whites of the eyes." He 
has made a good record as a student, even though much of his time has been spent visiting 
Meredith. j 

Hugh Johnson Howell /\j\^ Asheville, N. C. 



"Chronicle" Business Staff (1, 2); Columbian Literary Society; Assistant Manager of Wrestling Team 

(31; Manager of Boxing Team (4); Pan-Hellenic OBuncil (4); Chairman of Class Ring Committee (4J; 

Invitation Committee (4); 'Y. M. C. A.; Varsity Club. 

As a diplomat and "one of the boys" on the campus, Hugh's e(|ual is hard to find. He is de- 
pendable in all respects, and when once he sets out to do a thing, rest assured that it will be 
accomplished. His disposition has gained for him an enviable number of friends. 



S6 



mussmizn 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 OL2d • 



515I5T51Sl515l1 




Senior Class 
Lhila Jeaxxettr Hl rbarii FaycttcvilK', N. C. 

X A <!', ■!■ li K 

Peace Institute (1); Publications Council (2); Women's Glee Club (2, 3), ManaKer <S); "Chronicle" 
Start (3); "Chanticleer" Staff (3); Y. W, C. A. (?. 3. 4). chairman Program Committee (3), Vice- 
President , tl) ; Eko-L. 

"Ill poetrv and English prose I hnpe to sing my fame" may be termed Leila's ambition as we 
gaze into the future for her. As head of the English departinent in some college, she may 
revolutionize the present methods of English teaching, \ivacious and petite, Leila is ever "on 
the go" in her active life. wv///- i 

^ ^^/^ 



Ellen Harris Hlckabee . 



Albemarle, N. C. 



K A, <f B K, K A n 



Freshman and Sophomore Honors: Freshman Representative nn Student Council; "Chronicle" Staff 
(2): Women's Glee Club (1. 2. 3. 41. Socretar.v of Women's .Student Government Association (2), 
Corresponding Secretary (3). President (4); Y. W. C. A. Cablnt-t (3, 4); Secretary-Treasui'er Class (3); 

Taurians; EUo-I.; 'White Duchy. 

All through her four years at college Ellen has been outstanding. Loved ami admired h> every- 
one who knows her, she is a loyal and sincere friend. Although her duties demand many serious 
moments. Ellen is full of fun and likes a good time. Her dignity and charm will be sorely 
missed next vear. 



Jaime.s M.agruder Hlnter, Jr. 

Biology Club; Member Braxt'-n < 




. . . Turkey, N. C. 

rndiTm:nlu:it.- Assistant in 



^iotogy^2). 

Hunter's hobby is chemistry, and he is considered quite a shining light in thi- Held. In other 
fields, also, he is efficient, as many members of the fairer sex can vouchsafe. When Jim leaves, 
we lose a cheerful, considerate, sympathetic, helpful, anil sincere friend, and our wishes go 
with him for success. 




Fletcher, \. C. 



'Women's League of Voters. Vice-President c3): 
nm chemistry Club. 



K.ATE Ola Israel 

Honor Roll (1); Philomathian Literary Society 
Phy.«ies Club (3); 

\Vh> dii all these ('hem students spend so much time at the "lab"? 'Lhere must be smne attrac- 
tion other than the course itself. Kate's humor and good sense are such that we always like 
to have her around. A pal indeed whom we fear to lose if so many letters contnue to go 
to Emory. y 

O 



57 



irafHraiHJHJHja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 Q2d > 



51515151515151 




Senior CI 



ass 



Mariana Eastmere Jarvis , Swan Quarter, N. C. 

T. W. C. A.; Southgatc Dramatic Club; May Court (4): History Club; Louisburg College (1, 2). 

Mariana has onI\' been with us for two years. During her stay here she has won numbers of 
friends and is ever the same, quiet, sweet girl. If }'ou ever need a friend, you can be sure tn find 
one in Mariana, for she has all the qualities needed in a friend. 



WiLBERT ArMONDE JeNKINS 



jPv 



Durham, N. C. 



Sophomore Honors; I\'iy Stien'.-e Prize t2»; Biology Club. 

"Ham" has made good use of his time in college as is evidenced by his winning the coveted Ivey 
Prize as a culmination of his untiring efforts in the field of biology. He is a true friend, a 
pleasant companion, and a man whose hand is as good as his word. 



Beryl Jones 




Durham, N. C. 



"Beryl", in the symbolism of her name, na.s color", liTe" and unforced gaity. Her social grace 
is equaled only by her ability to know, say, and do the correct thing at the right time. She 
knows the secret of rare good taste in dress; behold the "Queen of the May"! 



'^' 



Faylene Jones W East Durham, N. C. 

This cheerful, intelligent and attractive "Fay" is a puzzle to her friends and classmates. We 
wonder how she has been able to graduate in music and from college in the same year. She 
sings and plays well, makes good grades, is a good sport, and an asset to any social gathering. 



58 



IrafEJzraraiaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

■ 1 O 12 ft 



515151515151511 






Senior CI 



ass 



Otho J. Jones, Jr Albemarle, N. C. 

i 

Rutherford College (1. 3),; •■Clironicle" Ht.-ifT (4). 

Otho came to Duke from Rutherford College in his junior year. Adapting himself to campus 
life easilv and readily, he buckled down to hard work and has made an enviable scholastic 
record. His congenial nature has won liiin many friends who esteem him for his courteous 
manner and attractive personality. 



Wr?) 




Glenn Ballentine Judd . . fJ^-^-k • ' Varina, N. C. 

Chemistry Club. Biology .jriub"^»CBrrt^^yota c;aiiiiii:i Pi; Ci-o\vell S'i.-nie Club. 

Due to his diligent work in the laboratory, Clenn has hail little time to "loaf" aliout the campus, 
but for those who know him intimately his place will he hard to hll. Knowing his sterling 
character and his capacity for hard work, we congratulate him on his certainty of achieving 
success in life. 



Harrv B. Keffer 




Hj 



C<: 



Washington anil Jefferson (1, 2. 3). 



Durnig his stay at Duke Harry has made an impression on all of us. IK- takes things as they 
come and never seems to have a worry or care about him. He possesses that indertnahle some- 
thing that goes so far toward making friends and achieving success in his life work. 



Rhoda Athaleene Kelley .... ^"vjN^ West Durham, N. C. 

Rhoda is very enthusiastic. She works while 3ne works and when time comes for playing she 
can certainly play. Rhoda is one of the friendliest girls you have ever seen, always interesting 
and sympathetic and ready to share another's troubles and joys. Our class would not be 
complete without her. 



59 



irHJEjarafHjafE 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 QSS • 



51515151515151 




Senior Class 



C. 



Douglas L. Kellev Wilmington, N. 

A 2 *, o A K 

Freshman Football. Track, and Ba.skethall (Captain): Varsity Football (2, 3. 4); Ba.^kFtball (2. 3. 4), 

Captain (4); Tombs; Varsity Club. 

Behold a man among men! "Doug's" athletic prowess on the gridiron and on the hasketliall court 
has made him an outstanding man on the campus, and his likeable personality and warm 
friendship have won him a place in the hearts of all. He will always live in the hearts of 
h's classmates. 



John G. Kidd 



.m>. 



Center, Tex. 



Coming to Duke from Southwestern University at the beginning of his senior year, John quickly 
established himself in the minds of his fellows as a student and a gentleman. Reserved, almost 
taciturn, he solves his problems deliberately, is good company in any society, and inevitably 
will succeed in his chosen field. ■- , - ^ - __ ic::^«« 

Charles Atkinson KiRKPATRfcK. .' . ' Thomasville, N. C. 

n K A, * B K, OAK, 2 T, A <!> T 

Business Manager of "Archive" (4); Musical Clubs 12, ?,, 4); Tombs; Manager-Elect of Tennis (4). 

Shorty's sense of the eternal fitness of things forbids me to write the usual slushy eulogy and 
commands that I transcribe the great truth that modesty, sincerity, effort, initiative, and re- 
sponsibilitv are the cardinal virtues in life. His keen sense of humor makes him master of 
every situation. . ^^^f ^ 

Rebecca Kirkpatrick Thomasville, N. C. 

K A e, X A *, * B K 

Sophomore Honors; Glee Club (3, 3); Society Editor "Chronicle" (4); White Duchy; Pan-Hellenic 
Representative (3. 4); Delta Phi Rho Alpha. 

"Becky's" diminutiveness has not at all affected her talents. She is a student who has par- 

d her ability is deserving of the highest praise. If 
her life will be a notable success. 



Becky continues in the path she has begun 



J 
O 



6o 



rssimnsnsi ihe_cha-- c^leer isihisihisistsi 




Senior Class 



LiLLiE M.\E Ki.LTTZ Diirliam, N. C. 

Lillic Mae has made many friend-, amonu her classmates, who know her to be always sweet, 
kind, and thoughtful. Although quiet and modest, she has such pleasing and winsome ways that 
her friendship is greatly valued. Her amialilc and conscientious dispositi(jn, together with her 
unselfishness, assure us of her future success. 



Willis Kritbs Kramer . 



A^y/^ 



7!^A T fi 



Fli/:ibctli Citv, N. C. 



Assistant Baslvt-tball ^^aIlay| -r I 1. 



3); Pan-Hi'llL-nlc Coum 11 (4 1. 



Willis has strength of character, dependability, and practical common sense. He is an earnest 
student, a likable fellow, and a sincere friend. 'I'hese admirable ipiaKties alwavs create a 
feeling of admiration and respect. V\'c point out Willis as a campus leader and as a strong 
mail in his class. 



Kexneth Lagerstedt 




Urocktoii, Mass. 



9019; French Club |2, 3. 4). President (i); Biology riiih HI; gi>plinmori. .sirholarsliiii; Freshman and 

S<»phoniiir,. Hum. IS. 

"Lag" is primarily a seeker after knowledge, and he has attained much honor in this field. How- 
ever, he has by no means sacrificed h!s college life for study. He is especially ethcient in 
planning and arranging parties. He takes an interest in everMhing that In- undertakes, and 
his efforts are not spent in vain. 



Virginia Lee 



Portsmouth, \'a 



Conservative and well-balanced, Virginia is an exponent of the doctrine of "laissez-faire." Her 
calm, easy-gning ways and rare endowment of beaut> make for her a striking personality. We 
marvel at the ease with which she has made such good grades, and her suavity is both envied 
and admire<l by her associates. 



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Edvvix M. Leight Walkertown, N. C. 

A 2 * 

Davidson College (1); F>-eshman Baseball Team (12); Varsity Baseball (3); Hesperian Literai-y Society. 

"Lefty," or "Drag," came to Duke after a year at Davidson, and their loss \vas our gain. Due 
to his disinclination to be garrulous, very few know that he is a profound philosopher, but 
those who do know him intimately respect and admire the conclusions he draws about men and 



u. 



Harry Lemmond '. O) Indian Trail, N. C. 

Columbian Literary Society; Wrestling Squad. 

Naturally of a quiet and reserved nature, Harry seems to take things just as they come. But 
when one penetrates to his inward nature, he finds there a wonderfully likeable disposition 
and qualities of true friendship. We feel confident that his indomitable spirit will bring him 
success in any profession he chooses. 

Charles Hart Litaker . . /#,f^^vrrffTTW^3!!*\V Charlotte, N. C. 

n K A 

Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; Freshman Track and Cross Country; Varsity Track (2, 3); Varsity Club. 

Charlie is known on the campus as a jolly good fellow, and on the cinder path as a runner 
without peer. Although the son of a Methodist minister, he is much interested in a Baptist in- 
stitution in a nearby city; at least, his frequent trips to Meredith would indicate as much. 

Donald Richard Lumpkin VVS' Durham, N. C. 

^A2, A*r, KAn 

Freshman Cross Country; Band (1, 2, 3. 4); Glee Club M); Symphony Orchestra (1, 2, 4); Jazz 
Orchestra (1); Hesperian Literary Society; Durham High School Club; Y. M. C. A.; Delta Upsilon Beta. 

Donald has shown us very little of his inner self, and he might even appear phlegmatic to 
a casual ac<]uaintance, but to those who best know him he is a dreamer whose vision extends 
beyond the horizon of life. Genteel in conduct, friendly in manner, an all-round good fellow 
— "he's the last word" ! 



£z 



IrajEfHiifEjaia 



THE^HANTjCLEER [SlSlSTSlgJSTSTJ 




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Eva Candler Malone \'illa Rica, Ga. 

TjaGrange College (1. 2); Glee Club (2); Spanish Cirrle (2); Honor rluh (1. 2); Secretary and Treas- 
urer Irenian Literary Society (2); Y. W. C. A. (], 21; Treasurer V. W. r. A. (4); Glee Club (4); 
Women's Student t'ouncil, I'mrtor (1, 2, 3, 4). 

Georgia all too rarely sends us her daughters, and so we are especially glad to receive them 
into our midst. Eva came to us only for two short years, hut she is as much one of us as any 
other. A t\pe of girl admired li\ all, \\ e liate t(» part with her. 

V-' J.i '■_>■ 

Madison Ward ]\Ianess . . Jt^V— <lfJ>-T-'^Jt^ Rowland, N. C. 

Columbian Literary Society ;l'^\5eetliny Squa'i (2. S^TO^f ^- ^- •^- • Asbury College. 

Here is a man worthy of respect and admiration — a friend to all, not too serious, not too care- 
free. Although Mancss has not presented himself to us in spectacular ways, he has contrihuted 
much to the support of the campus activities. Above all things he is a gentleman in every respect. 



Sidney Allison Martin 




. . Waym-svillc, X. C. 



.\ssistant Manager "Chronicle" (1. 2, .■? i ; Taurian Plnyers i1. •_', 3. -1); Chairman Lighting Committee 
(3); Student Branch American Institute of Kl-'hitnl lOnKineers; Physics Clu>> (1, 2). 

Diminutive in size, but a giant in mentality, evidenced b\ his ability to attend all dances and 
athletic contests and at the same time to "pull down" good grades in his studies. A true 
friend, a scholar, a gentleman of the old school, and first and always an engineer — that's "Sid"! 



'#' 



Joe Kenneth Matheson Trontinan, \. C. 

Behold Duke's greatest optimist — Joe. He is a happy-go-hicky fellow witli great ambitions and 
still greater ability. He works when it is necessary, and after that he doesn't work. Look tor 
him to be a capable lawyer. He has given up his idea of being a poet and a bookkeeper. 

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Malcolm Randle Matheson Raeford, N. C. 

AX K A n 

AVri'stling Squad (1. 2), Varsity i^): Si'nnish Cliih; Historical Society. 

In Ramile we finil a comhination of those qualities which make a friend both loved and ad- 
mired. He has accomplished much during his sojourn at Duke, and is graduating in only three 
and a half years. With his wonderful personality, quick wit, 
anything hut success for him. 



and ability, no one could predict 



B^/^ 



Frank Webb McCracken, Jr. . 'oxw.'ol Sanford, N. C 



Baiirt (1, 41 ; 



A 3 *, A * V 

Interlraternity Basjiathnll (1. 



4): Delta Upsilon Beta. 



Glco Club C); 

We shall miss Frank's cheery laugh on the campus and in the "Dope Shop." We shall look 
in vain for his familiar form on the Washington Duke dance floor, where his inestimable social 
qualities have made him a popular figure. We are sure that Frank will get what he goes after 
ife. Jt^ jg^' 

'""" Waynesville. N. C. 



Gladstone Wadlev McDowalL 




M.alhrinatics Club; 



Iota Gamma Pi 



Sophomore Honors; Hesperian Literary Pociety; 

"Mac," or "Happy," as he is known to some of us. is one of the famed "mountaineers" from 
Waynesville. When he entered college he indulged in work on the track, but soon gave this 
up for more scholastic work. His membership in several honorary organizations attests to his 
abilit\' as a student. 



Elizabeth C. McKenzie 



Converse College (1. 2); Biology Club (3) 




Timmonsville, S. C. 



•resentative on the Woman's Student Council 
A. 

Apparently absorbed in her own world, "Lib" never gets excited over anything. In fact, she 
is rather indifl^ercnt, but nevertheless the good things of life always come to her. We are in- 
clined to think that the reason for this is her unusual combination of sympathy and understand ng 
with beauty and an attractive personality. 

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^^'ILLI.AM Nelson McKexzir, Jr Gibson, N. C. 

A 2 <!• 

Fraternity Baskitball ; Class Baskftliall . At^sistant MaiiagiT ■■CliroMirl." i2 .1); Tiiinis Si|uacl. 

"Silent Bill" they call him, but \vhen he speaks \ve marvel at ilie udrkiiins dI hi- uiirul. Bill 
is like a pool of deep water, which is only gently distiirhed hv ihi- ptlihlc (Impped on its calm 
snrface, atid which seems to hold secrets unkno^^n to tlie common man. 

Seymour Esmond Mercer Washington, N. C. 

Hesperian Literary Society; Ministerial Assncint ion. I'rtjsifleiit M); rMirliani llii^ii Sriionl t'Inli; raslor 

M. E. t'lnnxli. South, Kim City. N. ) '. 

Mercer has the convictions of Daniel, the courage nf Joshua, and the leadership of Moses. lie 
sees things in their proper proportions, and acts acrorilingly. No wonder that he maintained such 
a creditable standing in his stud>s.,It^i,b enough to say that this world will be better because 
he has lived in it. ^\^ / P^ 

Charles Henderson Milltr, Jr i'-^^ S.ilisbtirv, N. C. 

* A 0. A * r ^\\ 

Freshman Football; Assistant Manaser of Tr:ii I. 1. J : >\M C. A. Cahinet (1. 2. 3): Band (1. 

2, 3. 4); Class Football (1. 2); Columliiau Iwit.r.ii'. Sc. ptj(i\P'|urian Players l3. 3 A), Cast. "The 

Bad Man;" Delta I'p.-ilon Reta; l":in-He|lenlr Couinil. 

Charlie is a good actor, as the Duke audiences who have seeti him with the rauri:iii players can 
witness. However, his part as a villain on the stage is not ind'cative ot his true character. His 
specialty is doing things and letting other people get the credit. With such a virtue his career 
will be successful. C^y'x © iKCO 

Catherine Mills Cli.irlortc, N. C. 

<!■ I! K, K A n 

Freshman and Sophomore Honors: Elko-L; Kpfltiish Club (1, 2); French Club (3, 4); Secretary 

French Club (4); Women's League of Voters (3. 4); Literary Society (1. 2); V. W. C. A. Cabinet (4); 

Student Government Proctor; Br^Ktoii Ciaven Etlucatbin Society (4). 

Whether it be a French Club meeting, "date," \. W. C. A. program, or "bull" ses ion, "Cat" 
is always efficient. It seems to some a marvel that she is able to do so many things at the s;iine 
time, but when one considers her power of speech, he can easily understand this trail. 

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J. H. Mitchell Ardmore, Pa. 

"Mitch" has only been with us two years, but in that time he has become known among us as 
a loyal Duke supporter, especially in regard to athletics. His course, engineering, gives him 
a social handicap, but he makes good use of his time when he is not busy in Asbury. 



M. Elizabeth Montgomery 

T. W. C. A 



&//^ 



Graham, N. C. 



(1, 2); Brooks Literary Society (1); Braxton Craven Educational Association (8); 
French Club (2, Z). 

All the hard work one would imagine necessary for graduation in three years does not prevent 
Elizabeth from always being the friend-in-need to whom we can go at any time with our 
troubles. She retains her dignity uiider any circumstance. That friendly smile of hers has 
captivated the hearts of all of us. 



John Wesley Morgan 




Selma, N. C. 



Freslinian Htjnors: Sophomore Honors: 9019; Samlli.iillirs' 
Parker Prize Cup in Physics (-J; W M *' 



Club; Chemistry Club; Physics Club; 
A.; Iota Gamma Pi. 



One can see from h's scholastic record that Morgan is very studious. Rut he has taken time to 
mingle with the students about him and to form many lasting friendships. We hear that some 
of the town lassies will miss him, but he's determined to leave us this spring. 

AViLLiAM Raney Morgan, Jr Prospect Hill, N. C. 

•* B K 

Fresliinan Honors. Soiihrimore Honors; Treasurer of 9019 (4); lota Gamma Pi: President of Chem- 
istry Club (4); y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 

Morgan is an excellent scholar whom we are proud to claim as a son of Duke. His ability 
has not been limited to the field of science alone, as he has been outstanding in several other 
phases of campus activity. His common sense and capacity for hard work will bring him success. 

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Joseph Walter Ne.xl, Jr Walnut Com-, N. C. 

University of Arizona (-): Hiology club. 

Ncal deserted us his sophomore year and went to the fniversity of Arizona, where men are men 
and everything is dry (at least, so we've been told). We were glad to welcome him back his 
junior year, and ever since his return his carefully trimmtd mustache has been a familiar 
sight on the campus. 



WiLLi.vM Br.ausher Newbold 



Assistant Manager of Basketball <1. 




Kalcigh, X. C. 



ger of Tenn 



rrr74 



1; Aasis'.ant Manager of Track (1>. 



Bill is gifted with a keen and intelligent mind, and has a store of ready wit for every occasion. 
He never worries about anything very long, rather he constantly radiates gond huniiir and 
geniality. Bill has the two great qualities of frankness and sincerity combined with unusual 



ability, and a likeable personality. ^ I ^^\ Bi^ 



Sallie Banks Newmam 







Leasburg, X. C. 

: George Peabody College. 



Littleton College Student; Columbia- tflwien 

Sally has been with us only one year, but we VvonderYow we ever got along without her. She 
finds no task too hard, and is a girl of high ambitions and unusual ability. As a loyal, sympa- 
thetic, and sincere friend, her equal is hard to find* 



^ 



Dallas W^alton Xewsom, [r Durham, X. C. 

K A 

Glee Club (1, 2); Swimming (3); Hesperian Lltcraiy Soeiety; Fraternity lia.sketball (U', 3. 4); 

Pbysicg Club. 

Reservecl in a crowd, and a real friend among friends. \\';ilt's reputation is one of big-hearted- 
ness and kindliness. The son of a Trinity graduate, he has been a real part of the rni\'ersily. 
A friend was right when he said of Walt: "He is a noble fellow." 

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Henry A. Nichols Asheville, K. C. 

n E n 

"Nick" has quite a forceful personality ami is considered also as a thinker and an organizer. 
Many and varied are the tasks which have fallen upon his shoulders, yet failure is unknown 
to him. Tenacity and determination are combined with rare wit and an appreciation of the 
beautiful. Naturally, then, "Nick" must forge ahead. 

Edith Gibbons Parker Gastonia, N. C. 

A A n, e A * 

Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Class Secretary-Tn i-^uht (1); Taurian Players (1. 2. 3); Vice-President 
Taurians (4); Women's Student Govenimmt As.so( iutioTi, Treasurer (2). Council (4); Sorority Pan- 
Hellenic Council (2. 3), President t4t: yice-President Class (2); Freshman Honors: Sophomore 
Honors; Eko-L; "Chanticleer" Editorial Staff (2, S). t^o-Ed Editor (4); Vice-President Junior Big 
Sisters (3); Class Basketball (1, 2): May Court (4); ^lay Day Committee (4). 

You must know "Edie" to appreciate her true worth. She is unusual in that one seldom finds 
a girl indifferent to honors and popularity', yet efficient in every phase of activity, an honor 
student, and the most popular girl in school. Her record speaks for itself. She's a regular, 
good all-round girl ! 

Louise Pierce Parker , t ^- ,•' • • • Rocky Mount, N. C. 



y. W. C. A.; AthemrTiterary 



Freshman and Sophomore Honors; Y. W. C. A.; Athert^Eiterary Society, Treasurer (1. 21; League 
of Women Voters (3. 41; Braxton Craven Educational Society (3, 4); Eko-L. Secretary-Treasurer 

(3, 4); Forum, Pre-sldent (4). 

How Louise has so successfully mixed ancient Greek with Economics ancf outside activities and 
made Phi Beta Kappa is little less than a miracle to us. Always in the midst of college activities, 
always popular, she has made herself an outstanding and an excellent student. 

Claude Moore Pearce Timberlake, N. C. 

Freshman Baseball; Varsity Baseball (2, 3); Varsity Club; Tombs. 

Claude is a man who can always be relied upon to do his part of any given task and do it well. 
On the baseball diamond he is a wizard and has thrilled scores of onlookers by his stellar play- 
ing. A man among men, and a gentleman through and through. 

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Allen- Wooslev Pegra.m Winstoii-Salcm, X. C. 

n K * 

Freshman Cross Country: Treshman Trafk; ViirsUy Trark (2. 3. -1); Uvlay Tt-ani (i:, t); I-'ursyth 

County Club; Slianish Club. 

Allen chose the cinder path as a means of becoming famous on the campus. lie has followed 
the policy of not allowing his studies to interfere with his education, and as proof of this we 
point to the many week-ends spent ill pursuing those of the fairer sex. 

CvxTHiA Celexe Phiim's . . . .4^ iMdcpeiulciK-c, \'a. 

Class Basketball (1. 2); V. W. C. A., riibllclty (.'half man ili, .Manager of Store (<); W. S. G. A. 
Social Service Chairman (4); ManaK-'r y>f May Day T< a Uoi.m <:;); Mathematics Club; Taurian 

I'luy.if. Dell.i Pbi Rho -Vli.lia. 

Celene will work a task out with balanced foresight and logical thought; therefore she was 
given charge of last year's May Day Tea Room. And this year we find her capably managing 
that boon of Southgate, the "V" Store. We find the result of the combination of this valuable 
ability of management with personal charm altogether excellent. 



James AIar\ix Pigford 



i^^'nx ^ ' 



Hesperian Lii 




Wall.icc, N. C. 



!teti3b>hyslcs Club. 

Out of Wallace many men have come tn make their ways known to the world. "James" is a 
loyal son of his native town, and his stay at Duke has been one of exchange and profit, both 
to himself and to his friends. His future is his own, his past secure. 



Marglerite Poe Jt<3M^ West Diirh; 



'i^ 



\. C. 



Light-hearted and enthusiastic, Marguerite is ev*r a most enjoyable companion, one who makes 
a sad occasion less sad, and a happy occasion imre happy. Those who are associated with 
her most know best how dependable vhe i^. She has a charming personality which grows upon 
one the longer one knows her. 

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Senior Class 



Thomas Allen Priest Hope Mills, N. C. 

Frc-shman Track; Varsity Cross Country (3): ■'Chronicle" Staff (1, 2. 3); "Chanticleer" Staff (2. 3. 
4); Associate Editor (3, 4); Columlnan Literary Society; Historical Society. 

Here is a man who cnmes nearer knowing the entire student body than any other man on the 
campus. He spcruis his spare time getting acquainted, and as a result everyone is his friend. 



We have no doubts that he will succeed everywhere as he has here. 



Lewis William Purdy 




Oriental, N. C. 



Hesperian Literary Society; Chemistry Club, Vice-President (4); Biology Club; Band; Class Foot- 
ball (2J ; Swimming Teaui (4); Iota Gamma Pi. 

"Lewis" is a lover of science, as witness his act'vities in the various and yet related fields of 
biology, chemistrv and physics. Music has his attention besides, and his real value as a work- 
ing companion and friend is known to all who have crossed his path. "Lewis" is vital to '28. 



NOREEN MaUDSLEV QuERN 



Brooks Literary Si 




Charlotte, N. C. 



rench Club (3, 4). 



The Irish girl who possesses the true Irishman's sense of humor. To most of us the true Noreen 
has never been revealed, but those of us who have penetrated beyond her reserve have seen an 
unusual mingling of the qualities of unselfishness, sincerity, humor, and charm. 



C. Elmer Rankin 




Boone, N. C. 



y Society. 



"Elmer" is one of those people without whom the world does not move in its appointed course. 
His quietness of nature hides a good personality and real ability to accomplish a given amount 
of work, but it cannot conceal his capacity for understanding those with whom he comes in 
contact. Y , 



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Mi.NTHORNE W'ooLSEV Reed Wayiicsvillc, N. C. 

n K A 

Band (1); Track (1. 2. 3, 4). 

Mint has made himself one (if the best liked men in our class. His cheerfulness and unselfish- 
ness have gained him a real place in our hearts. He has been industrious and sincere in all 
things. We shall often miss hearing his hearty laugh ring out above the din of the "Hope Shop." 



James Robert Regan 

Rutherfold College (1, 2); 



^\v//^ 



Pi-esident Ministerial Association 



. . . Hope Mills, X. C. 

Ministerial Association (3, 4). 



Regan is another of the Rutherford College boys who has made good with us. He has been here 
only two years, but during this time he has ac(|ulred quite an enviable number of friends and has 
become much admired. His perseverance, industriousness, and conscientiousness spell hut one 
thing for him — success. 



LiLLiAx Rogers 



lli-^^ m 



Ch.-irlotu-, X. C. 



M",y C"Urt (4); May Day Comlilittec. 

A distinctively feminine individual is Lillian. Dainty charm characterizes her as well as achieve- 
ment in scholastic wcirk and ability tn direct and work out projects. Her subdued voice, her 
unchanging good temper, and her heai:ti:^:nipi»thy jJLhave tended to win her strong friend- 
ships in school Kfe. A»_— ^^C^l3C 

AViLLiAM Stewart Rogers Aslu-villc, X. C. 

A T n, * B K 

Tombs; Freshman Basketball; Captain Fresliman Tennis: \'arslty Basketball (2. 3. 4); V.'irslty Tennis 

(2, 3. 4). Captain (3. 4); Nortll Carolina Intf ri oTKgiate SinEles Champion. l:i26; RunnPi'-up in 

Doubles (192G-'27; Varsity Club; Class Vi<<--rrfSl(lint (3); Vice-President North Carolina Tennis 

Association: Freshnifln ;iiirt Sophomore Honors. 

Stewart has been prominent on the campus in many ways during his four years' sojourn here. 
He has been an outstanding player on the tennis team for three years and has excellent ability 
in basketball. In other fields, too, Stewart has excelled, namely, in the realm of scholarship and 
the wooing of the fairer sex. 

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Claiborne Carl Ross Durham, N. C. 

* A,e 

Few people at Duke have known Claiborne intimately, due to his being a town student, but 
to those who do know him he is everything one could desire in a friend. He is sterling through 
and through, and a conscientious student. He has con\'ictions and the courage to carry them 
through. 



Mary Hazel Rosser 




Coats, N. C. 



Reserved? No, not when you know her. Hazel is a good pal, sincere, and eiitirely dependable. 
All of us like to ask her to help in solving our problems, for with her good judgment and 
advice she can help one out of the most intricate difficulty. She is loved and admired by* all. 



Marvin Everett Roaster 




Lincoliiton, N. C. 



"Marvin" is one of those very quiet boys that help to make the fabric of a class strong enough 
to withstand the wear and tear of four years and after. He will win his way in the world after 
a manner that will be all his own — strong, secure, and free. 






Harry Ivory Saunders -/^^ Faison, N. C. 

Saunders' life in college may be distinctly written as an asset rather than a liabilitv. He has 
done consistent work in his "Ec" courses, but we have no doubt that he forgets all about them 
when he goes to Faison. With such inspiratiou, he should be highly successful as a C. P. A. 

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Roma Elizabkth Sawver Durh.ini, \. C. 

V. W. C. A. (4); Historical Club (4); Studont Oovernment Association (1, 2, 4>: Town tlicls" Clul) 

(4); I^eaguo of Women Voters (2), 

Roma is very ambitious, thoroughly alive, always interesting and original — the very life of 
the crowd. She is eminently capable of any responsibility that is put upon her. Beauty and in- 
telligence usually do not come hand in hand, hut Roma is certainly an exception to this rule. 



Anita C. Scarkoro . 



Davenport College (1); Delta Phi Itlio Ali.hii 
Student Government Association, i 'in resinjinl 



KaMn,-i|iolis, N. C. 



: V \\ . 



: Sophomore Honors: EUo-l^; Woman's 
'A)\ Latin Forum; Mathematics Club. 

An exceedingly versatile girl! That seems to be the best phrase we can use in describing "Neat." 
She has time to be a true friend despite her participation in iiuttierous activities — scholastic, 
athletic, and those of a nature quite apparent around the "Shack" on winter evenings or balmy 
spring days. 

DoROTHI A.MARM.LVS ScHALLIiRT .... J^^l\. 

K A-^^^ \\ 

Salem College (1, 2); Glee Club c',, li: 1 'li;i irni.i n MMy-^|lci 

ManaB<T "\ i;li'r I 'Illb' (<).' 

Were her abilities restricted to the science hall, the social occasion, ami the clas^roimi (these 
are her specialties) Dot would be a versatile person. Having in addition to all this an ever- 
lasting good nature in a rich admixture of friendliness, she has won the h'gh esteem of her 
classmates. 



Wiiiston-Salcin, X. C. 



ommitteo (4); Xu SiKnl.-i; Husiness 



Thomas JnFFERSox Shaw, Jr. 




Greensboro, X. C. 



University of North Carolina (11; "Archive" "Stair " i^. 4); "Chronicle" Start (2, 3), ContributinK 
Editor (4); Hesperian Liternry .Society; Cat's Head Club. 

Tom is one of those peculiarly enviable persons who live every minute of their years with a 
rare spirit that combities naivete with sophist cation and intelligence. He maintains an agile 
interest in an endless number of subjects, but books handsome in content and cover claim his 
major attention, while keen and polished critical writing is his forte. 

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IVIarv Shl FORD Durham, N. C. 

Quiet and unassuming, \vith a hatred for verbosity and affectation, Mary lives in a world all 
her own, where only beautiful thoughts are allowed to enter. In her gentleness is found the 
consummation of her virtues — consideration for others, friendliness, dignity, grace and bigness 
of heart. 

Ralph B. Shumaker . . . 



A\Y/1^ 



A * r 



Salisbury, N. C. 



Ruthei-ford College (1, 2); Glee Club (3. 4); Ministerial Association (3. 4). 

Rutherford College has given us another good student I Ralph puts; his studies first; but in 
addition to these, he has also developed his musical talent. He plays more than one instrument, 
and if there is no instrument available, he is equally competent to entertain us with his vocal 
ability. 

Louise Withers Sloan . 




Davidson, N. C. 



Honor Roll (1. 2. 3, 4). 



Although she has been at Duke only one year, all have discovered her to be most conscientious, 
always ambitious to make the most of her %vork. No one can say that she failed at any time 
to prepare her class assignments. Steadfast and true, ^he has all the characteristics of a suc- 
cessful teacher. 




Cecil Eugene Smathers . . . ••^TyA/V?*- Winston-Salem, N. C 



Freshman Baseball Squad; Tombs; Assistant Manager "Chanticleer" (2), Circulation Manager (3), 
Business Manager (4); Pan-Hellenic Council, Secretary (4). 

As a student he is among the best; as a friend he is dependable and trustworthy; and as a man 
he is admired by all with whom he comes in contact. He possesses not only those characteristics 
which demand our admiration but also those which frankly make us like him. 

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ass 



Emma Lee Smith Durh.i 



am, 



N. C. 



Since she is always working and hard at it, we sometimes wonder how Emma can accomplish 
so much with her many superstitions constantly crossing her path. The study of accounting 
is her chief interest, and though she is just a little bit of a girl, we can visualize her even now 
as a most important business woman. 



William Moore Speed, Jr. . . .vC).!yf r^.J 



Durham, N. C. 



Musical Clubs (2. 3, 4). 



"Bangin' Bill and His Banjo" — such a debut the white lights of Broadway will announce after 
Bill graduates from Duke. Bill has been prominent in the musical clubs of Duke for four years, 
captivating his audiences with his splendid vocal accomplishments as well as with his per- 
formance with the banjo. 1 1 tZ^ •J 



Theodore Reynold Spruill 




5jAv-<^ Mackeys, N. 



C. 



Spruill is by nature quiet and reticent. But neHs always there with the goods when there is 
need for him! Despite the fact that he has lived in the city during his ci>llege career he has 
acquired an enviable number of friends who hold him in the highest respect and esteem. 



John A. Sronce rl>> 



Aiulr 



N. C. 



Sociable, energetic, and capable, a fellow student of whom we are proud. Duke has had many 
fine fellows from the beautiful "Blue Ridge Mountains," and John is one among the best of 
them. A student of unusual ability, he excels in ''Ec; ' ask "Shorty." His many friends predict 
for him a brilliant future. (ty 



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Eunice Stamey Greensboro, N. C. 

K A n 

'\ 

Greensboro College (1. 2): Women's Stud'ent Couneil. Treasurei' (4); Glee Club (3). 

Eunice is charming! Her ever ready smile and personality have gained popularity for her on all 
sides. Although she has a "baby-face" and looks like a "flapper," there is a strong under- 
current of character and worth beneath. In her one finds a true friend. She is ideal in every 
respect. „ wi.// t 

William Wesley Stanfield . . V .•!■.' \ < Jonesboro, N. C. 

"Stub" is very quiet in a crowd. His remarks are very few, but you may be sure that whenever 
he does say anything it will be something worth taking in. "Stub" is alwaya ready to perform 
a good deed for anyone, and his heart is open to all. 



Edith Virginia Stevens 




Richmond, Va. 



Greensboro College O, 2"); Freshman ana Sopbomore Honors; T. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2. 3. 4), Pres- 
ident (4): Student Industrial Commissi. »n; Student Inter-Racial Commission; Member Southern Coun- 
cil Y. W. C. A.; Religion Council (4); Women'.s Debating Council (3. 4). Business iVIanager (3); Class 
Basketball (3); Historical .Society; I>an-1 l.U.nic Covmcil (4); White Ducby. 

She dreams of happy tasks ahead, and dreaming, makes her dreams come true. Her strong 
box of memories contains splendid treasures of accoinplishment and leadership, but she is indif- 
ferent as tin to all her inward gold. And we wonder, sometimes, if her memories don't cause 
her to dream of other things, too. ^TrJ\ ^ /\^k 

Melissa Strother Franklinton, N. C. 

K A H 

Braxton Crayen Education Club; "Forum" Club; Y. W. C. A. 

A dead langtiage as well as a modern seems to hold interest for Melissa when one considers 
her work in Latin, The Forum, and French. Tall, dignified and friendly, with a keen sense of 
humor, she appears to us all a person whose friendship is altogether worth while and desirable. 



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Mary ^VvLIE Sti art .Monroe, N. C. 

K A e 

A genial good nature, ready assi>tance to htr friends in any dirticnliy, and a fun-loving dis- 
position characterize Mary Wvlie. Her carefree philosophy toward work and worry never pre- 
vents her from enjoying anything that life may offer, be it an exciting athletic event or a lively 
gathering in Southgate. 



Jordan James Sl llivax . . . . 

Freshman Football; Varsity Cross ('i»uinr\ 




Rockingham, N. C. 

"' ^tiprnlng Team (4); Columbian l-itiTary 



In "J. J." we have found the luialities a real man and leader mu-^t possess. Oelilierale in 
speech, accurate iii thought, a man of keen intellect and maturity of mind, he has proven himself 
a student of unusual ability, a gentleinan of character, aiid an admirable man. Such a man 
must succeed. 



Charles Clintc 



IN SvVARINGE|vS^JO^f(Oy/ 



Cornelius, \. C. 



Few possess more des'rable personal traits than Charlie. His appearance and personality have 
won admiration from more than one co-ed, while his brilliant mind has made it possible for 
him to make nineties on his hardest courses. With these traits and his persistent determination 
we see noth ng but success ahead. 



Louise Tabor 




Gilkey, N. C. 



Louise is a I5avenport product who chose to finish with us at I^uke. There has been more 
music in the air since she joined <:ur group, and her ex(|nisite performances on the piano have 
delighted us all. Maybe Louise is dead in love? — at any rate, she delights in revere and vary- 
ing mood. 



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Senior Class 

Ethel Mae Taylor Kinston, N. C. 

Physics Club (1): Le Cercle Francais (3, 4); Athena Literary Society (1, 2); Committee on Rules 
Student Government Association (3); Sandfiddlers' Club; Co-ed Manager "Chanticleer" (4>. 

We claim that in Ethel \ve have the ^vorld's jojl^st co-ed. No one enjoys a joke quite' as much 
as she; no one makes the best of a bad situation as easily as Ethel. Agreeable, fun-loving, and 
generous to the extreme — "Ef" sees life through rose-colored glasses. 



John Ivor Taylor 




Salt Lake City, Utah 



A "Bloody Englishman" this. Adventufous, wen fra^'eled, well read, but NOT well settled. 
He dreams of Mexico, of Old England, of our own West, and of a woman here and there. He 
might "go back" sometime to see how they are. "But that's a lot of trouble," he might add. 
A gentleman and a student with a philosophic turn. 



Arthur Leo Thompson 




N. C. 



Cheerful and optimistic — that's Arthur. He has a charming personality and meets everyone 
with a smile. He has an ideal philosophy of life; therefore, the ministerial field affords a great 
future for him. He has been actively engaged in religious activities of the University, and has 
gained many lifelong friends. 



.«s 



Bessie Virginia Thompson Norwood, N. C. 

•I' B K, K A n 



Freshman Honors: Sophomore Honors; Broolcs 
Y. W. C. A.; Elto-L; I..- 



y Society (1, 2); League of Women Voters; 
Francais, Treasurer. 



Another good reason why gentlemen prefer blondes! Bessie knows how to be a true friend, and 
consequently the links in her friendship chain are many. Nor has she been negligent of scholarly 
activities, as the Greek letters above attest. The Class of '28 would never have been complete 
without Bessie. V 



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THE^HANT^CLEER ^mSTSmSlgi] 




Senior Class 
Ernest Clarence Tili.Ev Durham, N'. C. 

Historical Society; Braxton t'ravcn Kducation Association: Associate M.nilicr Taurians; Class Basket- 
ball (1, 2). 

"Coach" began his college career with a strong jOeterminatlon to become an attorney, and he has 
ivorked consistently towards this goal during h^S^four years at Onke. His diligence, power of 
concentration, disregard tor the dithculties of algiven task, and liis natural ability will bring 
him success in his chosen profession. 



James Nardix Trlesdai.e 



K, <I> H K, A K, 2 T, A >!' I' 



Lincoliitoii, X. C. 



Tombs: Freshman and Sophomore Hoin.i^ 

ident i2): Public I^ectures Committe.- i;;j; 

President Men's A.ssociation il); ' 



Snliliciinni-r ainl .lunior .Scliolarsliips ; 9019; Class Pres- 
'•l,,wsi.al .hill, t:l, ,■ Club (1, 2. 3). President (<); Vicc- 
■Iiaiili.-le. !■■ .--tirr I :;. S), Editor (J); Red Friar.s. 



Take the scholarship of Erasmus and the brilliance of Locke, mix with the melodies of Beethoven 
and Caruso, stir beneath balmy Southern skies with the spirit of Hon Juan, invoke the magic 
Terpsichore, and boil on the oven of versatility — the restilt \vill be neither I'rancis Hacon. Michael 
Angelo, or a Brunswick stew, but our uwn "'Jimmie," the eternal conundrum. 



RoiiERT Gregory Ti tti.i;, Jr. 



Xi'wton, \. C. 



A i: *, OAK, T K A 



Tombs: 9019: Varsity Club; Hesperian I.itirai> 
(4): President Greater DuUe Clnb: Vice-Pi .sij. m 
Honors: Arizona-DuUe Debate (2): \V;ik,- F<.rf-i 
man Football and Track .'Squads: Varsit\- Tr.-ielv 
Championship (4); Two-Mile Record at !miI< 
"Southern Methodist l;.. 



ret;u-y |3). Vic4*-President (4), President 

: Viee-Presidt-nt Senior Class; Sojihomorc 

I ::); ■■Spenier Bell Prize" (3); Kresh- 

- Country c;. :). 1). Captain |3) state 

Mlantlc Indoor Two-.Mile Record (3); 

yl I i); Red Friars. 



"Bob" has left most of us far behind, especi;illy «hcii we refer to his splendid performance on 
the track. The numerous honors he has attained dearlv show that he is an outstanding inan 
at Duke. But above all, "Hob" is ;i true friend and a gentlcm:in of the highest t\'pe. 

Marie Tm.er DurlKun, \. C. 

K A. K A ir 



Girls Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Durham lliKh .fchniil Club; 



>an-llellenic Council (.1, 4 1. 



Every graduating class has its literary geniilSes, Its outstanding athletes, and its scholars, but 
few classes are so fortunate as to have among Its members such a genuine gem of womanhood 
as Marie. Possessing a keen intellect and a sit\cere goodness of heart, she is emblematic of the 
ideal co-ed. T 



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Dan Hollow ay Umstead Durham, N. C. 

"Dan" started out in his college career to become an engineer but ended up an economist. He 
is a fine fellow "for a' that," and knows what he wants to do now. He is surtj to succeed. A 



friend to all who know him and a good student, 



John Wesley Varner 



Rutherford College (lA'Z 




Concord, N. C. 



and; Chemistry Club. 



A man small in size but big in ability and likeable qualities — there you have \'arner. Those 
who know him say that he is reserved, industrious, serious, yet congenial — a true student and 
a real man w!th time for only the most worth-while things. 



Alma Lee Vaughan 



Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Class 




Roanolce Rapids, N. C. 



Nu Sigma. 



Alma has especially distinguished herself in athletics. As president of Delta Phi Rho Alpha 

she exercises her executive ability admirably. Everyone likes Alma. Though at times extremely 

dignified, she often displays her w!t and appreciative sense of humor. Furthermore, she has 
made a good record in the field of scie 



Fielding Lewis Walker, Jr. . 




Durham, N. C. 



Sigma. 



As Lewis lives in town few of us know him well, but his worth has been recognized through- 
out his college career. He is a man of few words, but those few are of wisdom, and his opinions 
are accorded due consideration always. He possesses a pcrsonalitv which appeals to all. 

V 



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THE^HANTjCLEER [SlSlfilSlSygisil 




Senior CI 



s, X. C. 



wn (lirl Kr-prt*- 



ass 



Kathrvx Warlick (iianitc 

Z "D A 

Greensboro College (1, •2); IrvtliR Literary SoeipJ^^. (1. 2); Class Secret 

sentative V. W. c. A. (I I. 

Leaving G. C. and fnllnwing tlif excellent example of her older sisters, "Kat" caiiie In Puke in 
her junior year. She soon proved her worth in college activities, and althoofih she deserted the 
"Shack" this year to live in town, she has made a host of friends who will regret her departure. 

Sni.MA \Vari.ick I.awniialc, N. C 

K A II, X A <f 
Southgate Short Story Prize CM; Si.ilionir.r, li.n.,.-. .|,T-.,nM)e- ..mill (3); ■Throniele" StntT (3. 
4); "'Archive Stalt (3. 4); "L'hantiel- cr" si. til i .H ) : ^\^JluuJl a siiKi--iit ilovernment Assoeiatlon Repre- 
sentative on Publication Board; Y. l^■. t '. A. v:»l>in«'t <4); Influstiijil Commission (3, 4); I^eague of 
Women Voters. Secretary (3); Wonttn'H 1 >('baLilig <.oiinril; BtuXton Craven FIdueation Association; 
Historical s'n^iety (2. ;: i : cle\(_.l:ind tininity Club. 

"Be good or I'll make a story out of \ou" is Selma's favorite threat, for nothing escapes her 
keen eyes and in'nd. Selma inay he either a successttil journalist, a novelist, or a playwright, 
but she can never be prosaic or conventional, for her life will, of necessity, be as colorful as her 
personality. - ~'\!l 'J-U.V'y* — ^ 



Charles Clinton \Vn\vi;i 



\Viiiston-Salein. .\. C 



Tombs; Beta Omega Sigma; Athletic Counc|! 
Men's Association (4); Freshman HonorH 
Football (2. 3. 4); Varsity BaskelbaT 



pnt Council (3. 4). Chaliman (4); President 
pthall. Basketball and Baseball; Varsity 
feity Baseball 12. 3. 4); Reil Friara. 



The reader probably recognizes this picture as having adorned either some sport page or a 
front page of "Who's Who" among student officers. No kiddin', one inight call Bo a veritable 
paradoxical "club sandwich, " of which the coMipuntiit parts ;;re statesman, athlete, student, and 
all-round good fellow. 



Lucv Wesley 



w 



Barwick, Ga. 



So quiet and unassum'ng is Lucy that few havV known her intimately at Duke. She embodies 
real and genuine refinement and a warm friendliness which make for her a winning personality. 
Only good can come to Lucy, because she unconsciously brings out the best in those associated 
with her. 

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Neila Elain'e Weston Swan Quarter, N. C. 

K A n 

Louisburg College (1. 2); Forum Club (3. 4); Y. W. C. A. 



A combination of the impossible! Here's a co-ed who 
modern and not at all consistent with Cicero or Virgil 
her scholastic ones, as she is always ready to take part 

Gladys Ruth White fo^ 

Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors; Junior Soholarship 
Treasurer (4); Braxton Craven Education Club; Mathematic: 
Cup (3, 4); Eko-L; Whiff Duchy; Dcltri 




majoring in Latin, yet her ideas are 
Neila's social attributes are equal to 
11 social activities. 

Durham, N. C. 



Women's Student Council. Assistant 
Olult. President (4); Parker Physics 
Phi Rho Alpha. 



An ideal student! At last here is one we may so properly characterize, one who is excellent in 
all things, whether it be in Math, Greek, Education, athletics, leadership or any other course 
or phase of college activity. She radiates her pleasing personality to all who come in contact 
with her. 



Rachel K. Willlams 



K A e, T iaJ^;>'" 



Elizabeth Citv, N. C. 



Randolph-Macon Woman's College (1. 2); Secretai \ 
oil (4); Duke-William 



V. W. I', 
iii.l .Mary 



A. (4) ; President Girls' Debating Coun- 
Debate (3). 



She is capable, clever, well poised, and has that innate sense of humor and the joy of living 
to keep her from cold perfection. Add to her native ability a never failing fund of common 
sense, a perception unclouded by prejudice, and these are the attributes that make her what she is. 



^^ 



EuLA Louise Wilson ■ f?y^ Warren Plains, N. C. 

Eula has very definite notions concerning one's duty in "This Life's Business," and her prepara- 
tion for the particular place she is to fill has been conscientious and thorough. What visions we 
have of "the little red schoolhouse" over which she will rule gently but efficiently! She leaves 
a host of friends. 

y 



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M.\RCARnT Elizabeth Zacharv 



Z T, A 



Sullins Collet;!' II 2). 



Sanford, M: 



"Maggie" won our hearts when we first saw that smile and those bewitching dimples. (Jriginal 
and unusual in thought and expression, she is an engaging companion at any time. Friends have 
tried to persuade her to come hack and get an M.A., but if all reports from Charleston are true, 
we expect her next course will be domestic science. 



Bexja.mix H. Zigl.ar . . . 

Columbian Liter;ii-y Society, Vice-rr 
icle" Staffs C 




Greensboro, N. C. 



idint 1 4): Y. M. C. A. Qabinet (4); "Chanticloei-" ami "Cliron- 
: Rutherford College Club: Phy.Sirs club. 



Alphabetically speaking, Ben is at the bottom, but that i? only in name. In the things that really 
count he stands at the top. Even the busiest moments in the old Dope Shop could not dim his 
smile or rob him of h's friendly word. Ben is sure to win in the game of life. 




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JUNIORS 

From The Thinker. By Rodin 



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Junior Class 

WILLIAM CARTER ADAMS, 2 X 

WILSON, N. C. 

Football (1. 2. 3): Baseball (1. 2, 3); Track (1); Bas- 
ketball (1): Tombs; Beta Omega Sigma. 

JAMES McALPIN ALBERGOTTI, JR., K 2, :i; T 

ORANGEBURG, S. C. 
Cat's Head Club. 

T. E. ALLEN, JR., K A 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Fresliman Baseball; Frishman Track; Football Squad (2, 
:!) ; Beta Omega Sigma. 

VIRGINIA PEARL ANDERSON 

COWARDS, S. C. 
Lander College (1, 2). 

CHESTER J. ANDREWS 

FAIRMONT, N. C. 
Hesperian Literary Society; Ministerial Band; Y. M. C. A. 

JAMES WILLIAM APPLEWHITE, n E n 

STANTONSBURG, N. C. 
Wrestling (1. 2, 3); Varsity Club; Tombs. 

CLARENCE BRYAN AYCOCK, ^I' A 2 

FREMONT, N. C. 

Classical Club; Taurian Players; Hesperian Literary So- 
ciety. 

PAUL F. BARHAM, X T 

MARION, S. C. 
The Citadel (1). 

FELIX SCOTT BARKER 

LANSING, N. C. 
Wrestling Squad (1). 

RALPH BARKER, A ^ <S> 

SPENCER, N. C. 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Beta Omegt, 
Sigma; Varsity Baseball Squad (2). 



FRANK BEVACQI'A, :S n 2 

MX. VERNON, N. V. 

Secretary-Treasurer A. I. E. E.; Physics Club; Math Club; 
Golf Squad. 



CHARLES GRAYSON BIGGS, * A 2 

LILLINGTON, N. C. 

Sophomore Honors; Hesperian Literary Society; MInia- 
terial Association; Associate Member Taurlans. 



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Junior Class 

MONIK V. HI. MOCK, /. T A 

R-\l.i:i(;il, V. c. 

MARION HOI.ICII, K A 

WIVS'ION-SALEM, N'. C. 

Frisliman Fnotbiill ; Varsity Fnoll.all (2. 3. 1): Bfta 
f^ilU'ga Sigma. 

UKXRV CONNOR HOST, II K A, A ■{• V 

l-RVVIN', \. C. 

Beta (Inii'sa Sisma; UIim- Clul) (1); nam! (1. 2, 3)' .Sym- 

plinny Oicliostra (1. 2, 3): Jazz Oiclu-.sli a (1 2, 3); u'ulta 

Upsilnii Bi-ta. 

niRlLWI WORTH HOVETT 

SMnHFIELD, N". C. 

Freslimaii Honors; Sopliomore Honors; 9010; Fruslirnan 
Basketball 

JOHN WILLIAM BRADSHAW 

RELIEF, K. C. 

JOHN WILLIAM BRASWELL, i: N 

DEMOPOLIS, .ALA. 
Howard College (1, 2). 

CANSAU D. BROWN 

TRAPHILL, \. C. 

V. ^r. !•. .\. Cabinet (2. 3); Hesperian Literary Society; 
Ministerial Association; Hades Club. 

FRED BRUMMITT 

OXFORD, N. C. 

Football (2. 3); Freshman Track; .'Secretary Y. M c 
A. (3). 



oc;den carr briton, a x a 

MT. GlLEAl), N-. C. 

A.ssistant-Manager Track (2, 3); Band (2); Delia Upsilon 
Beta; Chemistry Club; Iota Gamma Pi. 

morden r. buck, o a ■!> 

ROCHESTER, N. V. 

Taurian I'layirs (I. 2, 2), Manager (3): Casts of "The 

Crow's Nest," "The Swan," "Wappin' Wart," 'The Yel- 

lowjacket," "The Bad Man." 

ELISHA HARRY BUNTING, II K 'I- 

.VEW BERN', N. C. 

Hesperian Literary Society; Assistant Basketball Manager 
(1. 2, 3); Freshman Football (1); Varsitv Football !-'quad 
(2. 3); Varsity Wrestling Squad (3); Sandnddler's club. 



JOHN LOCKE BURKE, A X A 

SALISBLRV, N. C. 

Beta Omega Sigma; Cat's Head Club; Taurian Players; 
Cast "The Swan"; "Chanticleer" Staff (2, 3). 




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MARSHALL JAMES CAHILL 

WINSTON'-SALEM, N. C. 
"Clironirlu" il, -. 3): Hesperian Literary Society. 

ANNIE LOnSE CALDWELL, A A II 

MONROE, X. C. 

Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Taurialis; Glee Club (1. 2, 31, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer (3): Freshman Honors; Y. W. C. A.: 
Class Baskethall (1). 

COKE CANDLER 

CANDLER, N. C. 

Basketball (1, 2. 3); Cross Country (1, 2); Track (1. 2); 
Football (3); Varsity Club; Tombs. 

MARJORIE CANNON 

ROSEMARY, N. C. 
Girls' Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. 

JOHN HOWARD CARPER 

ROWLAND, N. C. 

Columbian Literary Society; Ministerial Association; 
Wrestling Team (2. 3); Bo.xing Squad (2. 3). 



J. T. CARRUTHERS, JR., A A 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Freshman Basketball; Varsity Basketball Squad f2); Cap- 
tain Freshman Baseball Team; Class Representative Stu- 
dent Council (2); Secretary-Treasurer Men's Association 
(3); President of Class (3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



ROBERT A. CASSIDY, n K * 

XEWPORT NEWS, VA. 
Beta Omega Sigma 

JAMES NETTLETON CAIDLE 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
Chemistry Club (2). 

HAROLD R. CAVENAUGH 

SOUTHPORT, N. C. 



MARTHA CHESSON 

ROPER, N. C. 

Y. W. C. A. 11. 2. 3); Y Ca'binet, LTndergraduate Repre- 
sentative (3): Student Government Council (3); Biology 
Club; Religious Council (3). 



LINWOOD B. CHRISTIAN, A X A 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma. 

CHARLES WESLEY CLAY 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Student Volunteer; Cosmopolitan Club; Columbian Literary 
Society: Chemistry Club. 



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JAMES B. COBLE 

DURHAM, N'. C. 

Kreshman Cross Country: Taurinn Players; Cast, "Tlie 
Bad Man"; Hades Club. 



RA('lli:i. \K rORIA COI'F.I.ANl) 

WINDSOR, \. C. 

Fl'i'shinun Htuiors; Soplumiore Honors; (Jtrls' ('rU-r <'lul->; 

Cosmopolitan Club; Stringed Instrument Club; Junior Bis 

Sisters, President; Y. W. C. A.; Council (2, 3); French 

Club. 



JOHN CROMARTIE COUNCIL 

WHITE OAK, N. C. 
Business Start ••Chronicle" (2). 



CATHERINE HINT CREWS 

OXFORD, N. C. 



PAULINE CROSS 

DURHAM, N. C. 
TN'omen's Student Government (1. 2, 3). 

WILLIAM FRANK CROSS 

SUNBURV, V. C. 
Assistant Manager Swimming (3). 

JAMES EDMONSON CRl'TE, JR., K 2 

WILSON, N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma. 

GLADYS FLOWERS CULBERSON, K A O 

ROCKINGHAM, N. C. 
V. W. C. A.; Class Basketball: JIathematbs Club. 



THOMAS F. CULBRETH, JR., I T A 

FAYEITEVILLE, N. C. 

Hesperian Literary Society; Freshman Cross-Coimtry 

Team; Classical Club; Assistant Basketball Manager (I, 

2. 3): Comi^»ncement Marshal (1). 



ROBERT A. CURTIS, ^ A Z 

KINSTOK, N. C. 
Hesperian Literary Society. 

FLORENCE RONEV DAII.EY 

MEBANE, X. C. 

Delta Phi Rho Alpha: Glee Club (1. 2. 3); Representative 

Student Government (3); Class Basketball (I, 2, 3); V. 

W. C. A. 




irafEjaisfHrajs " 



THE CHANTICLEER 



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515151515151511 




Junior Class 



JOHN WEBB DANIEL 

HIGH SHOALS, N. C. 



MARY HELM DANIEL 

HILLSBORO, N. C. 



HARRY WESLEY DAVIS 

HEMP, N. C. 



JAMES HEATH DAVIS 

MONROE, N. C. 



J. ELWOOD DOXEY 

AYDLETT, N. C. 

Cross Country (1. 2); Track (3): Honors (2); French 
Club; Class Baskethall (1); Tombs. 



WILLIAM EDWARD DUNSTAN, JR., 2 X 

ELIZABETH CITi', N. C. 

"Chinnicle" Reporter (1. 2). Associate Editor (3); Track 

Sciuad (I, 2, 3); Band (1. 2, 3); Assistant Basketball 

Manager (1. 2), 



R. HAROLD ELLISON, 2 T A, 2 T 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cat's Head Club; 9019; ■■Chronicle" Staff. Reporter (1. 2); 
Managing Editor (3); Hesperian Literary Society. 



FRANCES BROWNLEY EVANS 

EDENTON, N. C. 

Wonian^s Glee Club (2, 3): Woman's Student Government 
Association. 



JAMIE HERRING EXUM, A A 

SNOW HILL, N. C. 

Assistant ManaKer Wrestling (1. 2, 3); Assistant Manager 
Boxing (2. 31; ■'Chronicle" Staff (1. 2). 



LITTLEJOHN TAYLOR FAULKNER 

HENDERSON, N. C. 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football (2); Columbian Lit- 
erary Society; Assistant Cheer Leader (2). 



H. K. FISCHBACK 

HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 



JAMES GILBERT FONVILLE, 2 * E 

NXUSE, N. C. 



IrafHrainmraJHl iii^^t'Si^i^ggg isisisTsisisig 



Junior Class 

MAK KORDIIAM, Z T A 
KINSrON, X. c. 

Meredith ColleKo (1); Il.mor Kull (1). 



JAMES WILBIR FITRELI., n K 11 

WILSON", X. C. 

I'^reslinian Track Team; Varsity Track Team 12); Colum- 
bian Literary Society. 



CHARLIE HUISTON CiAV 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Fresliman Wrestling Squad; Varsity Wrestling Siiuati (1' 

3); Varsity Cross Country Team (3); Pegram Cliemistry 

Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Boxing Squad (3). 



JOHN PARTRIIKiE CilBHONS, JR., 11 K A 
HAMLET, N. C. 

Assistant Manager Football (1); Class Football (1); Class 
Track (3); Cheer Leader (3). 



JOHN LAUDER GIBSON, A i; ■!> 

LAtiRIXnURG, N'. C. 
Varsity Swimming Team 1 2. 3); Track (3». 



O. C. C;ODFREV, A i: ■!> 
SPENCER, N. C. 

Freshman Football; Vaisity Football Squad (2. 3); Hes- 
perian Lit*-rary Society. 



PAUL GRADY 

KIN'STON, N. C. 

Mars Hill College (1, 2); Inter-Society Debate (3); Co- 
lumbian Literary Society; Glee Club (3). 



ASHTON THOMAS GRIFFIN, r T A 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

Chemistry Club; Iota Gamma Pi. 

HAL ALMA GRIMES, K A 9 

LE.XINGTOX, N. C. 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Class Basketball (2). 

ELLEN GUNTER 

DURHAM, X. C. 

HELEN M. HALL, Z T A 

WARREN', R. I. 

Taurian Players (2. 3, 4); Spanish Club (3. 4); Town 
Association (3, 4), 

MILDRED DORIS HANCOCK 

WILMIXGTOX, X. C. 
Louisburg College (1, 2). 




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THE CHANTICLEER 

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Junior Class 

STEWART RALPH HARDISON 

JAMESVILLE, N. C. 
Y. M, C. A, 

CHARLES HAMILTON HARGRAVE, K 2 

LEXINGTON, N. C. 

Freshman Tennis Team. Captain; Varsity Tennis V2, 3): 
Varsity Club, 

ISAAC E. HARRIS, JR., 2 T A 

CREEDMOOR, N. C. 

Assistant Manager of Basketball (1, 2); Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager "Chronicle" (1, 2, 3):. Advertising Manager 
(3): <"olumbian Literary Society; Chemistry Club. 

RUSSELL SAGE HARRISON 

PI.VETOWN, N. C. 

Freshman Honors; Hesperian Literary Society (2. 3); 
Iota Gamma Pi. 

GEORGE B. HATCHER 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Freshman Football: Freshman Baseball; Beta Omega 

Sigma: Athletic Council; ^'arsity Football <3); Varsity 

Club. 

MARY ARDEN HAUSS, A A n 

LINCOLNTON, N. C. 

Freshman Honors: Sophomore Honors; Junior Class Rep- 
resentative Council; "Chronicle" stafC (3); Taurian Play- 
ers (2. 3) ; Y. "W. C. A. 



ZOA LEE HAYWOOD, A A n 

DURHAM, N. C. 

MARVIN JOE HERRING 

MT. OLIVE, N. C. 
Taurian Players (2, 3), 

EDWIN JONATHAN HIX 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Durham High School Club; French Club (3); Y. M. C. A. 

HARRY E. HOLLINGSWORTH, n K A 

NEWTON, N. C. 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football (2, 3); Freshman 

Baseball; Varsity Baseball (2. 3); Beta Omega Sigma; 

Tombs. 

MILDRED ELIZABETH HOLTON, K A 8 

MIAMI, FLA. 

Fresliman Honors; Sophomore Honors: Mathematics Club; 
Y. \V. C. A. 

A. J. HUGHES, JR., n E n 

FOUNTAIN INN, S. C. 

Business Staff "Chanticleer" (2); Assistant Manager of 
Baseball (1, 2, 3). 



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Junior Class 

ROY A. lUNl'KK, II K A 
CHARLOTTE, \. C. 

Freshman Footbnll: Fn-shman Uiisk.tlnill ; Varsity <Mul); 

Varsity Football (2. 3): Varsity Uaskitball Ci); Tombs; 

Hopresenlatiyo on Atlik'llc Council. 

THOMAS WAPE INCIRAM, i) N 

ANNISTON, ALA. 

Howard t'oUegi- (I. 2). 

WII.I.IAM NELSON IRELAND, ^1' A i; 

IIAMPTONVILLE, N. C. 
V. M. !■. A.: lli-spiTian Literary Soiifty. 

D.WUI KELLY JACKSON, JR., i: T .\ 

GASTOXIA, N. C. 

Freshman Honors; Assistant Trafk Manager (II; Sopho- 
m.ire Honors; SlOiy; Hesperian Literary Soeiel.w 



HAZEL V. JOHNS 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha. 

NANCY JOHNS 

UURHAM, N. C. 

AMOS NEILL JOHNSON, 2 X 

GARLAND, N. C. 

Stndent Connell (3); Vlee-Presitlent Class (1); Pesram 

Chemistry Club; Freshmall Baseball; Varsity Baseball: 

Tombs. 

AUDREY GLENN JOHNSON, Z T A 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Taurian rlavers (1, 2. :i); Treasurer .Junior Big F^ifete^s 
(3); Representative to Pan-Hellenie (3). 

CAVIN T. JOHNSON, JR. 

BEMSON', N. C. 



ROBERT MILTON JOHNSTON 

FARMVILLE, N. C. 

Assistant Manager Baseball II. 2. 3); Business Staff "The 

Archive" (1. 2. 3); Hesperian Literary Society; Editorial 

Staff "Chanticleer" (2), Photographic Editor 1 3). 



BERNARD HliYETTE JONES, <I> 2 E, 2 T 

BERRVVILLE, VA. 
Hampdin-Sidney College (1, 2); Track Squad |3). 



WILLL'VM KALEEL 

COLDSBORO, N. C. 
Secl'etary Class (2); Chemistry Club; Samlfiddler's Club. 




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51515151S15151 




Junior Class 

KATHERINE KENNEDY 

DURHAM, N. C. 



LAWRENCE HARRELL KILGO, K A 

ANDERSON, S. C. 

Beta Omega Sigma; Pegram Chemistry Club; Proahman 
Football. 



ELIZABETH KING, K A 

ALBEMARLE, N. C. 

Captain Class Basketball (1, 2). 

JENNINGS GRAHAM KING, 2 T A, T K A 

LAURINBURG, N. C. 

Fruslinian Honors; Sophomore Honors; Hesperian Literary 
Society. Secretary (3); Intersociety Debate; T.aurian Play- 
ers; 9019; Junior Class Secretary; Wake Forest Debate 
(2); Oxford Debate (3). 



RONEY WILLIAM LAMM, ^I' A 2 

WILSON, N. C. 

Y. RI. C. A.; Hesperian Literary Societ,\-; Sanilfl»ldlei-s 
Club. 



MARY WATSON LEGETTE 

LATTA, S. C. 

South Carolina Club (1, 2); Brooks Literary Society (1); 
League of Women Voters (2, 3). 



WILLIE NORFLEET LEIGH 

SAVAGE, N. C. 

VANN R. LINEBACK, A 2 * 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Assistant Business Manager "Chanticleer" (2, 3); Vice- 
President Class (3). 



CARROLL C. LUPTON 

CEDAR GROVE, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer Physics Club (2); Columbian Literary 
Society; Wrestling Squad (1. 2). 



EARL HUBERT LUTZ, * A S 

FALLSTON, N. C. 
y. M. C. A.; Braxton Craven Education Association. 

THOMAS EDWARD MARTIN 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Chemistry Club; Virginia Club. 

LOUISE MAYO 

DURHAM, N. C. 



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51515151515151 



Junior Class 

ROBERT FIT. TON McCRACKF.N 

VVIKSTON-SAI.F.M, N. C. 
Il.'sp.'i hui l.llcniry Society. 



WM. BCRKF. MEWBORNE, K A 

ORASfiEBURG, S. C. 



RICHARD WYANDT MOHN, 1 >^ K 

LOUISBURG, N. C. 
Assistant Baseball Manager (1, 2). 



JAMES MARION MOORE, i: ■!• K 

ROCK HILL, S. C. 



LUTHER D. MOORE, 2 <I> E 

GREENVILLE, \. C. 
Freshman Cheer Ltader. 



ALICE ELLEN MOSES, A .i n 

DURHAM, N. C. 

State Teachers College, Farniville, Va. (1, -). 



MONTEE BODDIE MOVLE, K A 9 

LILLIXGTOX, N. C. 
Louisburg College (1, 2): T. W. C. A.; French Club. 



WADE H. MYERS, * A 2, A * 1' 

EDENTON, N. C. 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Glee Club (2. 3); 
Symphony Orchestra (2, 3); String Club (2, 3). 



JOSEPH WILLIAM NEAL 

WALNUT COVE, X. C. 



WILLIAM KNOX NEWELL 

MACO.V, N. C. 



S. F. NICKS, JR., >I' A i; 

ROXBORO, N. C. 
Taurian Players; Hesperian Literary Society. 



W. C. PARSONS 

ELLERBE, X. C. 

Treasurer Columbian Literary Society (3); Wrestling 
Squad (1). 




IrsrajsrafHiafa 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 Q2d ' 




Junior Class 

ELBERT R. PARTRIDCJE 

MOUNT AIRY, N'. C. 



TALMAGE LEE PEELE, e A <t 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Taurian Players; Freshman Honors: Sophomore Honors: 
W. H. Pegram Chemistry Club: 9019; Winner Junior 
Scholarship: Winner Iota Gamma Pi Science Prize: Bi- 
ology Club. 



LYNN McIVER PERRY, A 2 <i> 

SANFORD, N. C. 

W. A. PIERCE, JR., K A, A * r, 2 n 2 

WELDON, N. C. 

Glee Club (1. 2. 31; Iota Gamma Pi; D-lta Upsilon Beta. 

RALPH SIMPSON PITTS, n K <1> 

GLEN ALPINE, N. C. 
Hesperian Literary Society. 

WILLIAM REID PITTS, 11 K * 

GLEN ALPINE, N. C. 

Assistant Manager Wrestling (1); Assistant Manager 

Track (1, 2); "Chronicle" Staff (1): Hesperian Literary 

Society. 

LISTON POPE 

THOMASVILLE, N. C. 

"Chanticleer" Staff (2. 3); Assistant Manager Tennis (1. 
2. 3); Classical Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3); Co- 
lumbian Literary Society. 

SARA JANE POWER 

PARIS, KY. 
National Kindergarten and Elementary College {1. 2). 

HARRY LEE PRESSON 

MONROE, N. C. 
Physics Club; Spanish Club. 

JACKSON TOWNSEND RAMSALR, i: T A, A * r 

KINGS MOUNTAIN, N. C. 

Glee Club (1. 2. 3); Chemistry Club (2); Hesperian Lit- 
erary Society; "Chronicle" Staff (2). 

CECIL C. RANKIN, n E n 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Football (2); Boxing (3); Rutherford College Club; Hes- 
perian Literary Society: Les Marquis Club. 

EDWARD SHORE RAPER, 11 K IT 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Hesperian Literary Society, Marshal; Business Staff 

"Chronicle" (1, 2, 3); Assistant Business Manager Boxing 

(3). 



imsmnmis. ime^hantjcleer 



5151515151515T] 



Junior Class 

PAMKLA READE 

ROICKMOXT, X. C. 
N. C. C. W. (1. -2). 



IIAROIX WALTER REYNDLOS, i; ■!• H 

CRITZ, VA. 

Fresliman Foolball: Virginia Club. 



JACK RICHARDSON 

MAKI.IMOV, W. VA. 
("hi-mistiy Clul). 



NATHAN STANLEY RICHARDSON, JR. 

OOVER, N'. C. 



NELSON G. ROSENBERG 

DURHAM, X. C. 

Freshman Honors; Sonliomorr Honors; Durham High 
School Club. 



JFANITA ELIZABETH ROUSE 

CHERAW, S. C. 
Taurian Players; Davenport College (1. 2). 



LUCY ANN SEAGROVE 

DURHAM, N. C. 



JOSEPH G. SEPARK, A T n 

CASTOXIA, N. C. 



WILLIAM ELLIS SEVERANCE 

LAKE CITV, S. C. 



MARY ELIZABETH SHIPP 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Chemistry Club; Biology Club; Nu Sigma. 



WILLIAM STRINGFIELD SLOAN 

WAVXESVILLE, X. C. 

Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors; 9019; Chemistry 
Club. 



AMOS GLENN SMITH, JR., 2 T A 

REIDSVILLE, .V. C. 
Hesperian Literary Society. 




^f^SL 



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• 1 Q2S • 



515I515151515T] 



%' ^M^'\^±f^'^-^W§ 




Junior Class 



EDWARD HARDIN SMITH, K A, A <t> 1' 

CLOVER, S. C. 
Delta Upsilon Beta; Glee Club (1. 2); Band (1, 2). 

MAY ALICE SMITH 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Y. W. C A.; Brooks Literary Society. 

PAUL WESLEY SMITH 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
Boxing Team (3(: Freshman Football. 

PAUL J. STACY 

FALLSTON, N. C. 
Y. M. C. A.; Chemistry Club. 

ALVTN BRADLEY STARNES 

MINERAL SPRINGS, N. C. 

STOYE EVERETT STARNES 

MONROE, N. C. 
Rutherford College (1. 2). 

LOUIS A. STATES, JR., A A 

GASTONIA, N. C. 

MAYBETH MARIE STEIDLEY, Z T A 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 
Davenport College (1, 2); Glee Club (3). 

BURTON G. STEWART 

GLOUCESTER, N. C. 

Physics Club (3); Columbian Literary Society (2); 

Wrestling Stiuad (3); Braxten Craven Education Club; 

"Chronicle" Staff (3). 

LILIAN BRIDGES STEWART, K A 6, X A <I> 

HIROSHIMA, JAPAN 

Glee Club (11; Fiench Club; Honor Roll (2); Cosmopol- 
itan Club; Honor Roll (3). 



THOMAS EDWARD SUMMERROW 

GASTONIA, N. C. 
Sophomore Honoi\s; Freshman Track. 

HELEN JACKSON TAYLOR, Z T A 

STOVALL, N. C. 

Freshman Honors; Class Representative on Student Coim- 

cil (1); Taurian Players (1. 2, 3); Debate Council (2. 3); 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3), Cabinet (3). 



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Junior Class 

FREnKKlCK S. IIIDMAS, '!• .i O 

DIKMAM, \. C. 



T. SPRlU.l. IIIORMON, i; X, T K A 
WINSTOX-SALF.M, X. C. 

Ilfsporian; WiiiiitM- Freshman Dt-bater's Medal; Inler.'e- 
elely Debate (1); Tennis il); InteieoUeBale HebatinK; 
Assistant Cheer Leader U, 2. 3); President i)f Class 12.; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Taurlans; "Chronielc" Staff; I'nblli 
l.eetures Coninilltee (3). 



DAVID II. THORPE, :^ X 

IIAVERIOKI), PA. 
"Chronicle" Staff l2. ;i): Cat's Head Club. 

LESTER LAC'V I'ODD 

CLAYTON, N. C. 

Assistant Cheer Leader (3): G'ee C;ub (1-3); Synii'b"ny 
Orehestra (31. 

WU.I.IAM ARRON TOMLINSON, 11 K .\ 

TROY, K. C. 



THOMAS D. TYSON, JR., X T 

MEBANE, N. C. 

Chemistry CUib. 



ANITA UMBERGER 

CONCORD, N. C. 
Glee Club (2, 3); Y. W. C. A. 

LEO B. VArOHN, JR., i) T A 

BOONE, N. C. 
Davidson College (1); Golf Squad (3). 

PAUL DAVID VEASEV, A A 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Advertising Manager "(■liantieleer" (2). 

WILLIAM H. WANNAMAKER, JR., K A 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Freshman Honors; Cat's Head Club; Assistant Man.'ijTer 
Tennis; Beta Omega Sigma. 

CARLETON EDDY WEATHERBV, II K •!. 

FAISON, X. C. 

Fieshman Football: Freshman Ilaseball; Varsity Footljall 
(2, 3); Varsity Club; Tombs. 



GEORGE EDWARD WEATHERSBEE 

NEW BERN, N. C. 
Glee Club (3); Symphony Orehestra (1. 2. 3). 




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J 



unior 



CI 



ass 



PAULINE SUSAN WEBER, Z T A, 9 A >1> 
DANVILLE, VA. 

Taurian Players (1, 2, 3); Glee Cluh (1, 2, 3); Secrit.-ry 
Taurians (3); Member of Casts "Madame Takes Hjr 
Leave." "The Yellow Jacket." "The Bad Man"; Treas- 
urer Class (3). 



DOROTHY LOUISE WESTBROOK, Z T A 

FRANKLIN, VA. 

^'irgi^ia Intemiont Collese (1); Sophomore Honors: Rp.an- 
ish Club. 



JOHN FRANKLIN WHITE, 2 T A 

RUFFIN', N. C. 
Freshman Tratk; A'arsity Cross Country (2). 



WILLIAM TATE WHITMAN, A A 
BOAZ, ALA. 



EDNA MAE WIDENHOUSE 

KANNAPOLIS, N. C. 
President of Girls' Glee Club (31; Y. W. C. A. 

JAMES WESLEY WILLIAMS, X T 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

LLOYD BAIN WILSON 

FALLSTON, N. C. 
Columbian Literary Society. 

ORMAH HENDON WOODS 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Town Girls Club; Glee Club; Historical Club. 



JOHN LISBON WOODWARD, A A 

RICHLANDS, N. C. 

Freshman Honors; Sophomore Scholarship; Freshman 

Cross Country anil Track; Sophomore Honors; Varsity 

Cross Country (2, 3); Varsity Club; Tombs; 9019; Y. M. 

C. A. Cabinet (3); Hesperian Literary Society. 



EDWIN S. YARBROUGH, JR., * A 9 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Freshman Honois; Sophomore Honors; Assistant Funtball 
Manager (2, 3); 9019; Spanish Club. 



MABEL CLAIRE YARBROUGH 

REIDSVILLE, N. C. 

Le Cercle Francais (3); Biology Club (2); League of 
Women Voters (2); Y, W. C. A. (2). 



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515151515151511 




SOPHOMORES 

From Atlas. Antique Sculpture 



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51515151515151 




Spencer B. Adams, Jr., K S . Greensboro, N. C. 
Ernest Alkxanrer Durham, N. C. 

Columbian Literary Society, 

Luther L. Alexander, AS*. Charlotte, N. C. 
W. B. Alexander, 2 * E, A ■!' r . Ayden, N. C. 

Accompanist of Glee Club; Student Director of Gbe 

Club; Blue Devil Orchestra: Uni\ersity (_'lub 

Orchestra; Symphony Orchestra. 

Clyde C. Allison .... Yanceyville, N. C. 
John W. Almond, II E II . . Albemarle, N. C. 

Assistant Manager of Basketliall (12). 

Fred Wm. Anders, AS*. . . Gastonia, N. C. 

Beta Omega Sigma. 

John B. Anderson, S ■l' E . . Asheville, N. C. 
Luther Erwin Angle, O A * . . Maywood, 111. 

■■Chronicle" Staff (1, 2); Vice-Presiilent Class 111; 
Taurian Players. 

Roger Lewis Barnes . . . Black Creek, N. C. 

Elizabeth Barnetie .... Ro.Kboro, N. C. 

Class Basketball (1); Delta Phi Rlio Alpha; The 
Forum; Y. W. C. A. 

Margaret C. Battle, Z T A . . Raleigh, N. C. 
Y. W. C. A.; Women's Glee Club. 



MiLFORD J. Baum, K S . Poplar Branch, N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma; Freshman Track. 

Evelyn Bell Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Southgate Dramatic Club (1); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2). 

Jean Sheldon Beloe, AS*. . GafFney, S. C. 

Baseball (1). 

Henry R. Bennett, 2 X . . Wadesboro, N. C. 

Assistant Manager of Baseball (I). 

Margaret Bennett. A A n . . Blackstone, \'a. 

Class Secretal-y (1). 

Farquhard S. Best, K S . . . . Dunn, N. C. 
T. A. Bone, A A . . . Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Baseball Manager (1. 2); Freshman Football; Beta 
Omega Sigma. 

Esther Louise Boothe .... Durham, N. C. 
Mary Elizabeth Braswell . McFarlaii, N. C. 

Chemistry Club; Women'.s Glee Club. 

Arthur D. Bridcers, A T fi . . Raleigh, N. C. 

Taurian Players; Cat's Head Club; Classical Club; 
Reporter ■■Chronicle" (1, 2). 

Lena Taylor Brooks, A A IT . Durham, N. C. 

Glee Club 111, 

Gordon Graham Brown .... Selma, N. C. 



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51515T51fF1515Tl 




Q 9 m3 







George Rakev Bryant, ^ - <^ . RUlimcmd. \'a. 
William P. Budd, 2 >I> E . . . Pratteville, Ala. 

Elizabeth Carlton nmhani, N, C. 

Mary Branch Cator, K A . . New York City 
Mack Ivey Clixe .... Gold Hill, N. C. 
Lee \V. Cole Hamlet, N. C. 

Freshman Football Team: Freshman Basketball; 

Wrestling Team and Track Team; Football (21; 

Wrestling (2). 

S. \V. CoLOXNA ..... Charl(ittc>ville, \'a. 

W. G. Coi.trane, Jr., r T \ . Siler City, N. C. 

\'iRGiMA CoLVARi) . . Niirtli W'ilkesboro, N C. 

J. Cnderwood Connally . . . Leasburg, N. C 

A.^isistant Bii-siness Manager "Archive" CI); Re- 
porter '■rhroniele" (1. IM; Historian l.iferar-.v 
Soei'-ty. 



Bessie Olivia Copeland 



Windsor, N. C. 



y. W. C. A. (2); Women's Glee Club (2); Women's 
Stringed Instrument Club (2); Honor Holl d). 

Whitworth Cotten, a X a . . Petersburg, Va. 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football Squail (2); 
Swimming Squad (2). 



Jos. Howard Coitrell, <1> A U . Richincirid, \'a. 
Reba Cousins Diirbam, N. C. 

Freslimaii Honors. 

Willie Baird Culbreth . . . Durham, N. C. 
"I'bantiel.er" Staff (1. 21; "Chronicle" (2); Taurian 
Players (I), Stage M.niiager (2); Hesperian Liter- 
ary Society (1, 2). 

H. Glenn Cuthrell, 2 T A . . Bethel, N. C. 

Hesperian I^iteral-y Society: Debate Council; Inter- 
Society Debate. 

Sanders Dai.l.«. :S X . . . High Pciiiit, N. C. 

(ilec dull (1. 2(. 

Lee F. Davis Wa\nc>ville, N. C. 

Koolliall .Siiu.i.l i:'). 

Tiio.MAs J. Davis, i; X . . . . Dainillc, \'a. 
l-'rcshmati Hascliall. 

Flora Beli.k Dawson' . . . GreeIl^bll^>, N. C. 
Davton RoiiiRi DiAN, :; .\ . . Mt .A!ry, N. C. 

Verne R. Drv Richfield, N. C. 

OsBORNi: F.. DiNN Clinton, N. C. 

WiLLiA.vi L. Dlnn, Jr Pinelops, N. C. 

Columbian Literaiy Socl<-ty. 



irBJEJHrajHfaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 
' 1 92;s 




Lillian Nell Edwards Sylva, N C. 

Taurians (1, 2); Basketball (1); Vice-President 
Town Girls' Club (2). 



Edna Kilco Elias 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Delta Phi Kho Alpha: Class Basketball (1); 
Women's String Instrument Club (1, li ) ; Y. \V. C. A. 

Helen King Eubanks .... Durham, N. C. 

Glee Club (1, 2); Frcnc-h Club (2). 

Fred Evans, A A Greer, S. C. 

Beta Omesa Sigma; Assistant Wrestling M.in- 



ager (2). 



C. LaMar Fair, A A 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



Assistant Manager Boxing; .Assistant Business Man- 
ager "Chanticleer" (1, 2). 

William D. Farmer Bailey, N. C. 

David Thomas Farr, XT... Clinton, S. C. 
Carter W. Farris, A T fl . , High Point, N. C. 

Freshman T^-nnis Team; Assistant Manager Bas- 
ketball (2); Glee Club (1). 

Robert B. Fearing . . Elizabeth Citv, N. C. 
A T n, A * r 

Orchestra (2); Beta Omega Sigma: Taurians (2); 
Glee Club (1). 

L. Holt Felmet Asheville, N. C. 

W. N. Fortescue Scranton, N. C. 



Harvey L. Frick ..... Gold Hill, N. C. 
Alfred Taylor Gant, K 2 . Knoxville, Tenn. 

Martha Gib-son Laurinburg, N. C. 

L. B. Gilliland, Jr., K S . . Clarksville, Va. 

Donelson C. Glassie,A 2 * . Chevy Chase, Md. 

VaJ\sity Swimming (1 2): Tennis, Captain (1); 
Varsity Cheer Leader (2). 

S. O. GooDE, Jr., a X a . . Greensboro, N. C. 

Cross-L'ountry (II: Wi'estling (1>; Beta Omega 

Sigma; Varsity Wrestling: Y. M. C. A. 

Wilbur Groome Greensboro, N. C. 

Harry CJudcer Candler, N. C. 

James F. Hackney, A T fi . . Lexington, N. C. 

Tennis Team (1): "Chronicle" Staff (1. 2); Wrest- 
ling Manager (1). 

. . Pikeville, N. C. 

Wilmington, N. C. 
y. W. C. a. (2); Glee Club I 21. 



John Donivon Hales . 
Evelyn Hancock . . . 



J. Chisman Hanes, * a 



Pine Hall, N. C. 



Hesperian Literary Society, Marshal (2); "Chron- 
icle" Staff (2). 

Hammer Hannah, K 2 . . Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma; Swimming Team (2). 



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# @ z @ 




Annie C. Harbison, T K A . Glen Alpine, N. C. 
Manager Women's Dehatinf? Chib <2): Y. W. < *. A. 

Willie Harriet .... P,illcick-villc. N, C. 

Sarah Alice Harrk, K A B . Seabnard, N. C. 

John H.assell, Jr Greenville, N. C. 

Ravman C. Hatley .... Oakboro, N. C. 

Ph.vsics Club (1); Columbian Literary Socif^y (J): 
Braxton Craven Educational Soeiety (I, -I. 

William Cecil Hauss - . . Lincolnton, N. ('. 
Columbian Literary Pociety; "Chanti<-leer'" Hlaff. 

M. K. Henderson, K S . . . New Bern, N. (\ 

■■Chroniele" Reporter: Hesperian l^itcrary J'ociety. 

Joseph Madisox Hepler . . Kernersville, N. C. 
Mary Elizabeth Hi.x .... ninbain, N. (". 
Mary G. Holland, .\ A II . . Srnithficltl, N ('. 

Glei- Clul, (1, 2 1. 

Troy McPhail Honeycutt ■ . . Ounn, N. (". 

Columbian Literary Soeiety, 

Charles Wright Hooker . . . OurlKun, N. C. 

Chemie.al I'Inh. 

H. G. Howie, A r: * . . . . Charlotte, N. C. 

Ernest L. Jenkins, - <1> E . Henry River, N. C. 

Freshman Baseball. 



Dorothy Jennette, A A n . . Norlina, N. C. 

Taurians (1. 2); Debating Council (1); Sti'ing 

Instrument Club (2): Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2|; 

rjelta Phi Rho Alpha; "Chanticleer" Staff i2): 

Secretary Class (2). 

Wm. H. Jennings, <> A B . Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Goir Team (2); Wrestling (1); Foolball Squad (1. 
2); Beta Oinefta Sigma. 

Hazel Johnson Ingold, N. C. 

Y'. W. C. A. <1, 2); tJirls Glee Club (2). 

Frances Johnston ..... Durham, N. C. 

Girls Glee Club |2); Durham High School (;lub (1. 
2): Town Girls i.)rg!tiiiz:ilinn I 2 I. 

W. E. Johnston, |k., . Winston-Salem, N. C. 
" A X A 
Fresbm.in Wri-stling. 

Violette Catherine Judd . . . Varina, N. C. 

Latin Club (1. 2); Y', W. C. .\. (!. 2); The Garden 
Club (2). 



. Old Fort, N. C. 

. Norwood, N. C. 

. South Boston, Va. 
Freshman Honors; Freshman Tennis Team. 

J. P. Kramer, Jr., A T fi . Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Glei- Club il. 2); Band (1. 2). 



Hubert L. Kanipe 
Henry L. Kendall. Jr. 
Geo. B. King, Jr., A A . 



105 



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51515151515151 




Walter Lfe Lanier Norwood, N. C. 

William C. Lassiter .... Smithfield, N. C. 

Blue Devil Orchestra (1. 2): Svniphonv Orchestra 
(1. 2); Band (1. 2). 

John S. Leach, II K * . . Washington, N. C. 
Beta Omega Sigma, 

Melva Iris LeGette Latta, S. C. 

Girls Musical Club (1): League of Women Voters 
(2); South Carolina Club; Y. W. C. A. 

R. L. Leonard Salisbury, N. C. 

Homer Luther Lippakd . . . Troutman, N. C. 

Cat's Head Club; ■Chionicle" Reporter (1. 2). 

Thos M. Little, XT... Wadesboro, N. C. 

Symphony Orchestra; Jazz Orchestra and Glee 
Club (2). 

J. Paul Lucas, Jr., K A, IS T . Charlotte, N. C, 

Glee Club (1); Swimming (1); Taurian.s I 1. 2). 

H. A. LuPTON H'lisboro, N. C. 

Haywood E. Lynch, ■>!' A li . Goldsboro, N. C. 
Y. M. c. A. 

Frederick M. L\on, K A . . Durham, N. C. 

Frances L. Mason, K A . . . Durham, N. C. 

Charles Eden Matthews . Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Charles Max Durham, N. C. 

Varsity Boxing. 

Peter A. Mazza . . . Mount \'ernon, N. Y. 

B. H. McCaslin, a T fi . Grand Junction, Tenn. 
Classical Club; Assistant Manager Baseball (1, 2>. 

Robert L. McClure .... Maywood, III. 
Maude McCracken, Z T A . . Durham, N. C. 

Town Girl Rej^resentative Woman's Student Gov- 
ernment (2). 

Elizabeth MacFayden, K A 6 . Concord, N. C. 

Glee Club (2); French Club (2); T. W. C. A. {1, 
2): Treasurer of League of Women Voters (1). 

Wm. Calhoun McIntire . . Wilmington, N. C. 

(_"nli]inl>i:in Literary Society (1. 2) ; Boxing 
Squad (1). 

John T. McIntyre, Jr., K A . . Bristol, Tenn. 
Beta Omega Sigma. 

E. K, McLartv, Jr., AS*. . Charlotte, N. C. 

Hesi>crian Literary Society; Glee Club (1. 2); 
.Swimming Team. 



James G. Miles, IT K A 



Bristol, Va. 



E. E. Mitchell, 2 <I> E . . . . Willard, N. C. 

Glee Club; Y. M. C. A. 



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Elizabeth Montgomery . . Wilmington, N. C. 
V. «•. c. A. 

Stephanie Moore Faison, N. C. 

Y. \V. r. A. U. 21 ; Girls a\ev Club l2j. 



Esther Jane Morris 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Peace Institute (1): "Chronicle" Staff (21; Chem- 
istry Club (1, 2); Stringed Instrument Club (1. 2). 

Bruton L. Mumford, 2 T A . Hanrahan, N. C. 

Chas. S. Murphy, A i: * . . . Wallace, N. C. 

Webb Alton Murray' .... Maiden, N, C. 

Frishman Baseball. 

Richard D. Noel, A A ... . Athens, Tenn. 

Freshman Honors; Swirnmins Squad lit. 

Herbert Norwick .... New York, N. V. 
Swimming Team. 

Herbert E. O'Keef, Jr. . . Wilmington. N. C. 

•■Chronicle Staff (1. 2); Swimming Squad (21; 
Freshman Honors. 

RoBT. R. Pearson, 2 T A . Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Columbian Literary Society; "Chronicle" Reporter. 

M. A. Peeler, n K A . . . Wilmington, N. C. 

Football (1. 2); Freshman Has. ball. 



Marjorie Peoples . . . . 

Glee Club (1 

Raymond K. Perkins, 2 X 



Blue Ridge, N. C. 



Fi-eshman Cross Country; 



. Concord, N. H. 

Freshman Ti'ack. 

W.M. Ci.HTON PicKEiT, Jr. . Lexington, N. C. 

Beta Unuga Sigma; Freshman Tennis. 

Dorothy Pillow, A A II . . New Orleans, La. 
Selby Rawli.ngs. K a . . North Emporia, Va. 
James M. Reams. Jr., i: ■!• ]■: . Kingsport, Tenn. 
Rufus W. Reynolds, i) T A . . Hemp, N. C. 

"umbian Literary Society; Y. M. C. A.; Assistant 



Cheer Leader. 



William J. Ritter, A A . . 
Haywood RonniNS, A A . . 

Y. M. r. A. Cabitu-t; Krcshn 

Paul N. Robbins . . . 

Mary F. Rodwell, a A H . 
Y. w. c. A 

TiioM.vs Clyde Rogers . . . 

W. H. Rousseau, Jr. . 

Columbian Literary Society (1. 2); Business Staff 
"Chronicle" (2); Freshman Honors, 



Lumlierton, N. C. 
. tiastonia, N. C. 

Ill Football Squad. 

. Siler City, N. C. 
. Warrenton, N. C. 

. . Durham. N. C. 
Orangeburg, S. C. 



107 



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51515151515151 




James B. Rowe Charlotte, N. C. 

Fitshman Ti-ack; Gli'c> (.'lub (1, 2); Beta Omega 
SigiiiJi. 

Margaret I.. Rovai.i,, K A G . New Bern, N. C. 

student Governmi nt Council (It; V. W. 0. A. l/ab- 
inet (2); Pan-Hellenie (-): l^atin Club (1. 2). 

Henry G. Ruark, II K A . . . Raleigh, N. C. 

Ronald Ruddick, A X A . . . . Ardmore, Pa. 

Alton Guy Sadler, A A . Rocky Mount, N. C. 
•■Chanticleer" Staff (1); Taurian Players (1. 2). 

C. E. St. Amand, Jr., X T . Wilmington, N. C. 

Wrestling, Tennis (1); Boxing (2); Wrestling (2). 

Richard L. Sample, 22 <I> E . . Fort Pierce, Fla. 
C. S. Scurry .... Hendersonville, N. C. 
Leila Isabel Self, K A . . . Lincolnton, N. C. 

Captain Freshman Basketball; L^elta Phi Rho 
Alpha. 

John Sidney Shaw, n E n . . Kinston, N. C. 

■•Chronicle" Staff (2); Freshman Honors (11. 
H. M. Sherard, Jr.,>1' a i; . . Giildshoro, N. C. 



Charles Moody Smith . 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Honor Roll (11; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); Classical 
Club (1); Columbian Literary Society 11); Minis- 
terial Association (1). 



Kathleen Smith Concord, N. C. 

Women^s Glee Club (1. 2); Y. W. C. A. 

Leroy R. Smith, A X A . . . Middleton, Conn. 

Ralph Cannon Smith, S T A . . Ayden, N. C. 

Class Football (1): Hesperian Literary Society; 
Fraternity Basketball (2); Sandfidillers' Club (1). 

James Benjamin Stalvey . . Tarboro, N. C. 
J. Savage Stanley, Jr., 2 <!> E . Asheville, N. C. 

Band; '•Chanticleer^' Staff (2); Delta Upsilon Beta. 

R. O. Starnes Asheville, N. C. 

Freshman Wrestling; Freshman Boxing; Varsity 
Wrestling; Y. M. C. A. 

Richard H. Stearns Maywood, 111. 

Freshman Honors; Treasurer Class (2t. 

Thomas S. Stearns Maywood. 111. 

Scholarship (1); Spanish Club (1); Band (1. 2). 

Wm. Alexander Stone, X T . Charlotte, N. C. 

Chester V. Strader, A X A . Greensboro, N. C. 
Freshman Baseball Squad. 

Irene Suther Concord, N. C. 

Southgate Dramatic Club il); Y. W. (_'. A. 

EvERETTE R. Teague, IT K <I> . . Madison, N. C. 
Freshman Baseball; Beta Omega Sigma. 



io8 



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1 £>12d • 




John W. Thomas, Jr. . . . Rockingham, N. C. 

Columbian Literary Sociuty. 



R. P. Thorxe, a T fi . 



Littleton, N. C. 



Freshman Football; ^'a^*sity Football; Beta Omega 
Sigma. 



. Littleton, N. C. 
Durham, N. C. 

Teacheys, N. C. 

. Durham, N. C. 

Anderson, N. C. 
Taurian Players (2); Cast of "Bad Man." 

Fred Ivan Walston Conetoe, N. C. 

Lamar A. Walters .... Barnesville, N. C. 

Thomas W. Ward .... Coleridge, N. C. 

Columbian Literary Society. 



S. T. Thorne, a T O . . . 

Mary Pauline Tilley . . 
T. w. c. A. 

James Moody Turner . . 

Annie P. Umstead, Z T A . . 

William Pitt Walker . . 



Millard W. Warren 



Edwards, N. C. 



Wrestling (1. 2); Boxing (2): Hesperian Literary 
Society; T. M. C. A. Cabinet; Football Squad (2). 



E. B. Weatherspoon, A A . . Durham, N. C. 

Freshman Honors: Hesperian Literary Society; 
Inter-Society Debate (1); Winner Freshman De- 
baters Medal; President of Class (2). 

James H. Webster .... Stokesdale, N. C. 

William K. Wells .... Petersburg, Va. 

W. Wendell Wells .... Asheville, N. C. 

John A. Whisenant, II E n . . Maiden, N. C. 

Chas. H. Winecoff . . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Track and Cross-Country. 

Wm. J. WING.4TE, Jr., HEn . Lincolnton, N. C. 

Taurian Players (1, 2). 

Geo. Miller Wray . . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Freshman Football; Freshman Track; Football 
Squad (2); Band. 

John E. Wrenn Southmont, N. C. 

Wake Forest College (1). 

. Weldon. N. C. 

Class Basketball (1); Class Uepresentative Coun- 
cil (2); Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Y. W. C. A. 

Henry C. Zachary, AS*. . Cooleemee, N. C. 
Glee Club (1, 2); Orchestra (1, 2). 



Alma V. Wyche, A A IT 



109 



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51515151SIE151 




FRESHMEN 

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IrEfHiZJHJHJZJE 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 9 2d • 



51515151S15151 



Fresn 



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man \uiass 



Abraham, John IIarwood . Alexandria. \'a. 
AcHESON, John Hain .... Kvaiiston, III. 
Adams, Joskph Prision', Jr. . . Monroe, CJa. 

AoKiNS, Emerv E Durham 

Ai.nRinoN, Martin Holt . . . Snow Hill 
Alcorn, Brick DAxnRiDGF. .... Ruttin 
Alk.xandkr, Joseph Clliirkth . . . Kinston 
Alexander, William Edgar . . . Purliain 
Aliord, Dallas I.lovd, Jr. . . . Durliani 
.'Xnderson, Ernest Coleman . . . Lenoir 
Anderson, John H.\scom . . . Asheville 
Andrews, Henry Lucian . . . Mt. CJileail 
Armeield, Joseph H., Jr. . . ■ Cireenshoro 

Atkins, Ennis \V c;a^tonia 

AvcocK, Walton Pikevillc 

Hacvvell, Withers Ivey . . . South Boston 
Baker, Rudolph Jackson . . Holly Sprinss 
Ballou, Edwin Samuel . . Winston-Salem 
Barbee, Arthur Odell .... Durham 
Barree, Mary Elizabeth . . . Durham 
Barnette, Mary Vance .... Roxboro 

Beacham, Weldon Grcenshoro 

Beai.l, Grogan Durham 

Bcasi.ey, Sarah Katharine . . . Durham 

Belk, Bundy Farice Waxhaw 

Bennett, Placid Burleigh . . Chapel Hill 
Bennett, Thomas Warner . Cleveland, (). 
Bertixe, Arthur E. . New Rochelle, N. V. 

Best, Rudolph Fremont 

Betts, Margaret Hinton . Baskeville, \'a. 

Billings, Mary Lee Durham 

Bloom, Jerome . . . New Rochelle, N. V. 
BoDDiE, Margaret Webb .... Durham 

Booth, Roy M Pollocksville 

Bost, John Hii.liard . . . Winston-Salem 

HowEN, Colon Ray Plymouth 

Boyd, Edna McLean . Washington, N. C. 
BRAnnuRN, James Monroe . . . Spencer 
Brannock, William Henry . . Reidsv'.lle 

Branson, Mary I Durham 

Brelholl, Carl Frederic . . . Pores Knoh 
Brian, Earl Wintrey .... Asheville 
Brinkley, Francis H. . . Portsmouth, \'a. 
Broadwell, Ethel Erdine . . . Durham 
Brogden, Georciana . . . West Durham 

Brown, Mary <;5eneva Raleiph 

Browning, Nancy Uhland . . Hillsboro 

Bryant, B. Allen Atlanta, Ga. 

Buffalo, James Henry, Jr. . . . Clinton 
Bull, Daniel Henry . . . Taylors, S. C. 
Burch, George Coleman .... Rnxhorn 

Burch, Vella Jane Durham 

BuRGE, Cecil Leland . . . Arlington, Ala 
Burgfss, Walter Leary . . . Old Trap 

Cain, Gladys Idelle Durham 

Caldwell, Elizabeth Miller . . Monroe 

Campbell, Willis East Spencer 

Carlyle, William Watts . . . Lumberton 



Carpenter, Adoi.phus Wesley . . Durham 

Carpenter, Donald Maiden 

CARPENrER, Elsie Lee .... Durham 

Carrigan, W'm. a. C;., Jr. . . . Hope, Ark. 
Career, Frank Woods . . . Danville, \a. 
Carver, William Malone . . . Rouncmont 
Caviness, Radcliffe I.. . . Portsmouth, \'a. 
Chandler, Alma Rebecca . . . Durham 
Chandler, James Lawson .... Rullin 

Ci.APP, CiEORGE WiLLARD . . . Burlill^ilon 

Clark, Dudley Chase . . . Miami, Ma. 

Clark, Ellen Louise Candler 

Clark, Walter R Plymouth 

Clippard, Dwight J Swannanoa 

Clutz, CiARi.AND Wm. . . Baltimore, Md. 
Cobb, Bertha Elizabeth ... Durham 
Cobb. Edgar D. . . Hickory Grove, S. C. 

Cobb, Rawis Durham 

Coble, Edgar Moody Durham 

Cochrane, Robert Bingham . . Asheville 
CoLci.ouGH, Madge U.\7.i{\. . . . Durham 
Coleman, Margaret Louise . . . Lyons 
CONNOCK, Robert Henry . . Norfolk, \'a. 

Cooke, Em.via Ellen Elkin 

Cooper, James P Camp Hill, Pa. 

Corte, Peter F Astoria, N. V. 

Cotton, Joe G . . Weldon 

Coulter, David Bruce . . N'anderRrift, Pa. 
Courtney, Robert Marvin . . Mornantmi 
Covington, Sam Robert .... Raleigh 

Co.\', Cosmo Lew Durham 

Co.x, Pheba Louisa . . . W!nston-Salem 
Craven, Donnell Reid ... Concord 
Creole, Eugene Travis . Washington, N. C. 
Crews, Charlotte Edwina . Dabney 

Crittenden, Zac Shellman, Ga. 

Crona, Gerald M Portland, Me. 

Croom, Percy F'dward Clinton 

Croson, Jos. McCUire . . Washington, D. C. 
Cross, Lila Roane . . . Memphis, TemL 
Crouch, Wm. Henry . Washington, D. C. 
Crowei.l, Sam . . ... Indian Trail 

Crowson, Neblett Ferguson . . Burlington 
Crull, Richard Morgan . East Orange, N. J. 

Crute, John Manson W Wilson 

Cunningham, Ivo Ferris . Bainbridgc, Ga. 

Dailey, John Colvin Durham 

Daly, Jack New York. N. V. 

Davis, Gilbert Peei.e . Washington, N. C. 
nE Brivne, Anton Locker . . . Durham 
Deese, Robert Clinton . . . Lumberton 
Deiso, Alfred J. . . . Mt. Vernon, N. V. 
Dempt, Herman Dietrich Rocky Mount 

Dermott, John Elliott . . . Durham 

Dickfrson, Robert Turpin . Richmond, \'a. 
Dixon, Harold Keith .... Kinston 

Di.xoN, Robert Daniel, Jr Trenton 

DoDCioN, Hazel May . . Wytheville, \'a. 



113 



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DoMiNiCK, Hal M Cordele, Ga. 

DoRSEY, \'. Arthur . . Hagerstown, Md. 
DosHER, Wilbur Eldridge . . Wilmington 

Duke, James Claud Concord 

Dunbar, John F. . . Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Eatman, Ida Pearle Bailey 

Eatmon, Wm. Godfrey, Jr. . Rocky Mount 
Edelman, Benedict Isaac . Neu York, N. V. 
Edmundson, Robert Burt . . Stantonsburg 
Edwards, David Calvin . . . Walkertown 

Edwards, Mark Ashcv.lle 

Ehringhaus, Erskine E. . . Hendersonville 
Eisenstadt, Norman . . New York, N. Y. 
Elmer, Charles Robert . . . Ironton, Ohio 

English, Hettie Mt. Airy 

EuRE, HiLLlARD M., Jr Lenoir 

Evans, Wm. Earle . . . West Plains, Mo. 

E\\'1NG, Kemp Battle, Jr Durham 

Farabee, Lawrence Burl . . . Lexington 
Faucette, Mary Elizabeth . . . Durham 
FiNKEL, Murray M. . . New York, N. Y. 
Fischer, Leon \'ERNnN . . Charleston, S. C. 

Fitzgerald, Bernice H Smithficld 

Flinton, Blair Raleigh 

Folk, Rowland RiYerside, III. 

FoNviLLE, Ralph William . . . Bahcma 

Forbes, Robert L Greenville 

Foreman, Lemuel R., Jr. . Elizabeth City 

Fo.v, Robert Washington, D. C. 

Frank, Grady Craven Durham 

Freeman, Wm. Chester . Washington, D. C. 

Gaddy, Wade Peachland 

Gamble, Allen Owen . . . Frankliiiton 
Garrett, Howard R. . . Washington, D. C. 
Garrett, Malcus Peorial . . . Durham 

Gee, Willie Henderson 

George, Ale.x Shelby 

Gibson, Elsie Neai Laurinburg 

Gibson, Harold Morgan . . . Laurinburg 
Gillette, James Irving .... Sm'thfield 
GoBBEL, James Thomas .... Spencer 
GooDSON, Alfred A. . . Russellville, Ky. 

Graves, William W., Jr Wilson 

Gray, Larry Lee Wadesboro 

Grimes, Byron C. . . . Hagerstown, Md. 
Grimsley, Edward Lee . . . Kerncrsville 
Groome, Wm. Jennings . . . Lumberton 

Hackney, J. P., Jr Charlotte 

Hambricht, Buford Carson . . . Grover 
Hamrick, Earle A., Jr. . . Winston-Salem 
Handelsman, Bertram . . New York, N. Y. 
Hanks, James Monroe . . Anderson, S. C. 
Harrill, Freeman Bronner . . . Spindale 
Harrington, James Thomas . . . Marietta 
Harrington, Milton E. . . . Greenville 

Harris, Reese B Asheboro 

Harris, William Kemp, Jr. . Bristol, Tenn. 



Hassenplug, F. Miller . Williamsport, Pa. 
Hayes, John Calhoun, Jr. . . Latta. S. C. 
Hayes, Robert Griffith, Jr. . . Charlotte 
Haynes, Roland A. . . . Cleveland, Ohio 

Haywood, J. Frank \\'axhaw 

Haywood, Thomas Luther . . Waxhaw 
Hedgepath, William Fred Clover, S. C. 

Heizer, James Sidney . Silver Springs, Md. 
Helms, James Luther . . . Morehead City 
Henry, Charles Howard . Plainfield, N. j. 
Herring, Mack Uriah .... Mt. Olive 
Hickey, Charles Avery . . Spruce Pine 
Hicks, Oliver Holloway .... Durham 
HiGGiNS, Gladys Merle .... Asheville 

Hill, Frances Faison Durham 

Hill, James Willard Sunbury 

Hinternhoff, Chas. F. . Union C!ty, N. j. 
Hobbs, Marcus Edwin . . . Wilmington 

Hocuit, Edgar Jerome Enfield 

HoLDEN, Chas. Harold . . . Maywood, 111. 
Holmes, Alice Elizabeth . . Walkertown 
Holt, Henry Gilbert . . Richmond, Va. 
Honeycutt, Alden Proffitt . . Burnsville 
HoNEYCuiT, Charles F., Jr. . Suffolk, Va. 
Hooper, Conrad Sidney, Jr. . . . Durham 
HooPY, tiEORCE Clayton . . Lemoyne, Pa. 

Hoover, Charles Denton 

Hopkins, William F. . . . Lansdownc, Pa. 
Horton, James Everett .... Aberdeen 
HoTTENSTEiN, Henry F. . . Millersburg, Pa. 
Howard, Richard Onslow . Swan Quarter 
HuLiNG, John McKee . . . Bristol, Tenn. 
HuLME, Francis Pledger . . . Asheville 
Humphries, H. Franklin . . Berwyn, Md. 
Hundley, Weldon Robert . Hampton, \'a. 
Huitenback, William Frederick . . Dunn 

IviE, George Harris Leaksville 

Jackson, Bynum Cooper 

Jarrett, James G Cherryville 

Jeffords, W. D., Jr. . Orangeburg, S. C. 
Jenkins, William Jarrett . . . Hobgood 

Jenkins, Robert Howard Oxford 

Johns, Patrick Henry Durham 

Johnson, Emma Bain Shelby 

Johnson, Irma Cornelia . . . New Hill 
Johnson, Lattis Merrimon, Jr. . Greensboro 
Jones, Emerson Philip . . Franklin, Va. 

Jones, Frank, Jr Durham 

Jones, Leonard Ellsworth . . . Sanford 

Jones, Mail Pearl Laurinburg 

Jones, Morris Rome, Ga. 

Jones, S. C, Jr Cleveland, Miss. 

Joseph, Ellis Semarang, Java 

Joyce, John Leroy Broadway 

Joyner, Russell Marvin . . Rich Square 
JoYNER, William Eppie .... Louisburg 
Kamenoff-, Warren G. . New York, N. Y. 
Kaufman, Samuel L., . . New York, N. Y. 



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Kkhi.mas, W'li.i.iAM II. . . New York, N. V. 
Khndai.l, Plunkr \Viiiri;i.A\v . . . Shelby 

King, Cabei.i naiiville, \'a. 

King, Joseph Ramon Fnisdri 

KiRBV, Walter Lawson .... Clastmiia 
KiRKi.ANi), JALK L nurliani 

KlRKI.AM), NlARGARET CAMII.I.E . . Dlirllalll 
KlRKPATRICK, Al.TO.V Hermit . SwepsDllV He 

Knight, CIrace Isobel Durham 

Knight, Hazei. Love .... Wihninjjtdii 
Knowi.es, Elton T. . . . Pasadena, C"al. 
Kramer, John Andrew . . Elizabeth City 
Krlpp, F. William . . . Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lambert, Eloise .... Laurence, Ohio 

Lamm, Jlrnev Dailev Wilsnn 

Lanois, Margaret Vernon . . . Durham 
Landon, Thomas Jasher .... Clintini 
Lasher, James Lewis . Havre de CJrace, Md. 
Latham, Hannis Taylor . . WashiiiKtnn 

Lawing, Clara May Charlotte 

Lawrence. LIaniel Charles . . . Sanford 
Leary, Lasali.e Needham . . . Old Trap 

Leath, Frances Inez Durham 

Lee, William Otwa, Jr. . . Danville, Va. 
Lehrback, Charles Wm. . Mt. Wrnon, N. Y. 
Leonard, J. Cleveland, Jr. . Bristol, Tenn. 

Liggett, Henry, R Carlisle. Pa. 

LicoN, James Harris Shelby 

Link, John Reinhardt Maiden 

Life, Edwin Witherspoon . . Kannapolis 
Littleton, John Osburn . . Holly Ridge 
LiVENGOOD, Charles H., Jr. . . . Durham 

Lloyd, Fannie Mae Durham 

Long, Richard Blaine .... Tobaccoville 

Long, Mrs. J. O Durham 

LoY, Milton Shelby 

LuPTON, John Wood Belhaven 

Lynch, Mabel Mildred .... Mcbane 
McCoNNEi.L, Cleveland .... Asheville 
McCracken, Sarah Katherine . . Durham 
McDoucall, Kenneth D. . . . Durham 

McFarland, Thelma Oxford 

McIlwaine, Edna K. • . Boldgett, Miss. 
McInroe, Ruby May . Walla Walla, \\'a^h 

McKay, John Woods Durham 

McKei.vey, B. B. . . . Fountan Inn. S. C. 
McKenzie, Dlncan Archibald Windsor 
McKinlev, John Preston . . Mobile, Ala. 

McKinney, Troy T Shelby 

McLaughlin, Donald C. . Hagerstown, Md. 
McNairv, John Egbert . . Cireeiisb-iro 

Malone, Inez Ruth Durham 

Malone, Vali.ie Iola Durham 

Mann, Glen Edward .... (.rcensboro 
Mann, Joseph Wesley, Jr. . . Greensboro 
Manning, Joseph Tilden . . . Jamesville 
Markham, Fay Randelle . . . Durham 
Marks, Corinne Wayne . . . Rosemary 



\L\rr, Lei a Mae .... U'inston-Saleni 
Marshall, Clarence Lee . . . Durli.m 
Marshall, W. Huef . . Takoma Park, D C. 
Mariens, J. Wesley . . Newport News, Va. 
.Mariin, Edwin Francis . . Hroektoii, Mass. 

Maritn, Jack Durham 

Martin, Jack J Charlotte 

Marjin, Janie .... CJreenville, S. C. 
Maritn, Robert Edwin . . . Danville, \'a. 
Mariin, William Souihgaie . U'ilmington 

Massengill, Ci. K., Jr Raleigh 

Massengii.l, Paul Robinson . . . Raleigh 
Matthews, Elizabeth Kelly . . . Durham 

Matthews, Leon Bessemer City 

Mauney', Frank M Gastonia 

Mayo, Robert Joseph lieilul 

Menaker, Frank H. . . . Harrisburg, Pa. 
Merritt, Gertrude Elizabeth . . Dunn 
Meyers, John .... New York, N. Y. 
Midgeite, Linville Edward . . . Norlina 

Miller, David Sam, Jr Durham 

Millican, James Leroy . . Bridgeport, Ala. 

Milton, Vance Sidney Roxboro 

Mims, Virginia Harris .... Reidsville 
Mitchell, Covin Lavelle . Fu(|uay Springs 
Moore, Carl Newton . . . WMmington 
Moore, Emanuel Lee . . . Danville, \'a. 
Moore, James Kenneth . New York, N. Y. 
Morgan, Bertha Gladys . . U'instoii-Salem 

Morgan, John Irvin, Jr Farmville 

MoRRiss, Luther J Jonesboro 

Moses, Anna Katherine .... Durham 
Moses, Preston Brooks . . Chatham, Va. 
Mulhoi.land, Elizabeth Fa^ e . . Durham 
Murphy, A Albert, Jr. . . . Ward. S. C. 
Murray, William David . . Rocky Mount 
MuRREi.L, Mildred Jane . . . Henderson 

Nachamson, Grace Durham 

Nachman, Henry Hertford 

Nash, (?eorge Earle . . . Sulligent, .'\la. 

Neal, Julian Spencer Spray 

Newsome, Nora Hazei Lexington 

Nicks, Mariana Hillsboro 

Noi.AND, Hugh Love .... Wa.vnesville 

Norton, Gradv H Cjrirtin, Ga. 

Ogburn, (Jordon Kellar .... Raleigh 
Oliver. Thomas William Chatham, \'a. 

O'Neal, Warren Robinson . . . Manteo 
OsnoRNE, Thomas Franklin . . . I.oray 
Osborne, Zkbui.on Frank .... Brevard 
Ovesstreet, Daniel Smith . . . Wakulla 
Paris. Frank Dominic . . . Freeland, Pa. 

Parker, Harris Hope Mills 

Parker, William Henry . . . Norwood 

Parrott, Jacob .Allen Kinston 

Paschall, Cii.ADYS Marie .... Durham 
Paul, Mack G New Ber i 



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Pearce, Helen Elizabeth . . Timberlake 
Pearce, Inez Moore . . . Richmond, \'a. 
Pearson, William Glenn . . . Gastonia 

Peek, Eleanor Hope Durham 

Peerv, Owen Blaine . . . Bluefield, \'a. 
Pender, Richard C, Jr. . . Brooksville, Fla. 
Pendergraph, Garland Roosevelt . Durham 
Pendergraph, Odis Victor . . East Durham 
Penn, William Scott, Jr. . . . Clayton 
Penney, Margaret Marea . . Chapel Hill 
Pennington, Joseph Bennett, Jr. . Tarboro 
Penny, Durema Elizabeth . . . Raleigh 
Petree, Urins Gray .... Tobaccoville 

Phelps, William A Durham 

Phibbs, Andrew Frank . . . Greensboro 

Phillips, Margaret Durham 

Phillips, Marion S Thomasville 

Pitt, Iva Knight .... Roanoke Rapxis 
Plaster, Arthur Russell . Winston-Salem 

Plummer, David Edwin Cid 

PoE, V'oNNiE Alberta Durham 

Pointer, William Wallace . . . Milton 
PooLE, James Robert, Jr. . . . Lumberton 
Porter, James Bryson .... Franklin 
Pons, Chas. Joseph . . . Salisbury, Md. 
Powell, Fannie Burwell . . . Henderson 
Pratt, Francis Marion . . Winston-Salem 
Pratt, Joseph Gaither . . Winston-Salem 

Price, Henry L., Jr Monroe 

Proctor, Gipsie Elvina .... Durham 

Purdy, Mary H., Oriental 

PuTHUFF, David H., . Huntington, W. Va. 
Radford, Annie Elizabeth . . Smithfield 
Rainwater, Frederick William . Roberdel 
Ramsaur, Hubert Dickson . Lumberton 
Ramsey, Colman Dalton . . Danville, Va. 
Randle, Clint Wilson . . Hickman, Ky. 
Ranson, Lloyd Russell .... Charlotte 
Rawls, William Eugene . . Suffolk, Va. 

Ray, George William Raleigh 

Ray, Horace Greene .... Raleigh 

Ravford, Judy Mobile, Ala. 

Reams, Isaiah Marion, Jr Dunn 

Reams, Robert Lawson Kingsport, Tenn. 

Reavis, Junius E Statesville 

Reddish, Paul Sigman Durham 

Redford, May Bess Durham 

Register, John Wright .... Clinton 
Rhodes, William Paul .... Lincolnton 

Rhvne, Jay Gordan Dallas 

Ricks, Robert Henry . . . Rocky Mount 
Roberts, Daniel Merritt. Jr., . . New Bern 
Robeson, Stuart Hogan .... Raleigh 

Rogers, Edna O'Neal Roxboro 

Rogers, George Howard . . . Asheville 
Rogers, Margaret Turrentine . Durham 
Rollins, Mabel Jeanette . . Forest City 
Rosen, Charles Daniel . New York, N. Y. 



RosKv, Marcus Chicago, III. 

Ross, John Bowen . . . Washington. N. C. 
Rossi, Philip Joseph . . Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Round, George McWain . . Rutland, Vt. 
Rucker, Elizabeth Jane . Rutherfordton 

Russell, Robert Moore Durham 

Rutenberg, John M. . . New York, N. Y. 
Sample, Jack McCoy, Jr. . Fort Pierce, Fla. 
Sandling, Jesse Jefferson . . . Durham 
Sands, Alexander Paul .... Reidsville 
Scarboro, Olin Everette . . . Kannapolis 
ScHi.ossBACH, E. A. . Bradley Beach, N. J. 
ScHOFiELD, Wm. Wilcox . Washington, D. C. 
Seaeolt, William Eugene . . Lumberton 

Self, Roy H Shelby 

Sellers, Wm. Porter, III . . . Norfolk, Va. 
Separk, Whorton Green, Jr. . . Raleigh 

Shamel, R. Mack Tobaccoville 

Shaver, Ralph Kizer Gold Hill 

Shell, Frances Ann .... Danville, Va. 
Sherrill, Jackson Harold . . . Cornelius 
Shull, Elizabeth Jane . . . Easton, Pa. 
Simon, William A., Jr. . . . Wilmington 
Simpson, Harold J Salisbury 

SiNCLETARY, MiLDRED CATHERINE . Clarkton 

Smith, Alverado B., Jr. . . Valdosta, Ga. 

Smhh, Homer H Cherryville 

Smith, Percy Walter . . . Cheraw, S. C. 

Smith, Walton Wright Wilson 

Smhh, William Deburnis .... Cary 
Sneed, Stephen McIlwain . . . Durham 
Snow, Henry Franklin . . Taylorsville 
Spear, Charles Edward .... Kinston 
Stanbury, Walter Albert, Jr. . . Raleigh 

Stanley, Ola Ruth Durham 

Starnes, Leslie William .... Monroe 

Starnes, Ney Durant Monroe 

Staton, J. Anderson . . Hagerstown, Md. 
Stei.ling, Charlotte Bliss . Providence, R. I. 
Stephenson, Benneit E., Jr. . . . Plymouth 
Stephenson, Marion O. . . . Rocky Mount 
Stevens, Carl Edmond .... Asheville 
Stewart, Daniel Niven. Jr. ■ . . Raleigh 
Stiger, Milnor K. . . Williamsport, Tenn. 

Stonj-, Katherine Durham 

Stuckev, Willie G. . . Hemingwav, S, C. 
Swain, Ned Reynolds .... Plymouth 
Swift, Charles David .... Greensboro 

Tagcart, John C Tidioute, Pa. 

Tallev, Hugh Avant, Jr. . . . Jonesboro 
Taylor, .Andrew DuVal . . . . Charlotte 
Taylor, Catherine C. . . . Rockv Mount 
Taylor, Frederick Wm. . New York. N. Y. 
Taylor, Sara Elizabeth .... Kinston 
Taylor, Thomas Glenn . . . Peachland 
Thompson, Ruby Lee .... Chapel Hill 
Thompson, Walter Ethel . . . Norwood 
Thornburc, Zado W Dallas 



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Thurman, John W.m., Jr. 
Traxtiiam, Jack Ei.mkr 
Troiikr, Hi nrv 1.i:k, Jr. 

TUCKKR, JuStPH FrA\C1S 
TURNKR, NUMA Fleilukr, 



. Rocky Mount 

Urcvarcl 

. \\'iii>toii-S;ilcm 

. . . CianliuT 

Jr. . . . Riilciuli 



TviVDALL, Albert Forhhs .... Kiii>toii 

Tyson, James Pace Mcliane 

Imstead, Hampton Hernice . West Oiirhain 
rsDERUOOL). S. BoiiuiTT, Jr. . . Circciiville 
Ipchlrch, \V. McC;owan, Jr. . . Raleigh 
Utlev, Clarence B , Jr. . . . Norfolk, \'a. 
Walker, Herman, Jr. . . Bradcnton, Fla. 
Walker, Mary Lipscomre . . . Hurliam 
Waller, Edgar Marsh, Jr. . . . nurhani 

Walters, Ale.\ H Latirangc 

Wannanl\ker, Isabel Durham 

Ward. Sarah Elizabeth . . Conway, S. C. 
\\'ard, Wadie Thlrman .... Bethel 

Warlick, Sue I")inham 

Watson, Nellie Margaret . . . Durham 
W.MSON, Thom.w Moore , . . Smthtiekl 

Weaver, Henrietta Durham 

Webb, George Lewis . . . Richmond, \'a. 
Webber, Marvel Cooper . . Rutland, \'t. 

Welch, Sam C Wa\nesville 

West, Hassie Eugene Durham 



Wist, Milton Joshua Warsaw 

Wesi, Robert' Dougl.\s .... Greenville 
Westcoit. Richard J. . Merchantville, N. J. 

Whitley, Angela Clayton 

\\'ii)ENHousE, Philip M. Kannapolis 

WiLKERSON, Mary Josephine . . . Raleigh 
Wii.KiNS, Elizabeth Mae .... Durham 
Wii.LER, Lawrence . . . New York, N. V. 
Wii.i.iA.MS, Henri Fuzelle . . Wilmington 
Williams, John Roger . . Norristown, Pa. 
Williams, Robert .... Elizabeth City 
Williams, Russell Avery . . . Siler City 
Wii.i.iA.MS, Siaton Fender . . Rohersonville 
Williamson, Charles Prate . Swan Quarter 
\\'ii,LiA.MS0\, F^i.sie Louise . . . Durham 
Wilson, Edward Francis . . . Matli'-on 

Wilson, Nellie Grey Oxford 

WiNSi.ow, C. Hudson, Jr. . . . Dayton, Pa. 
Wise, Horace Lloyd . . . Elizabeth City 

Wiseman, Scorr Ingalls 

WiSHART, John Empie .... Lumliertoii 
WrnicK, Donald Albert . . Maywood, III. 
WooDARD, Ralph Hartwick . . Selma 

\\'ooDWARi), Lii.A Mack .... RichlamK 
Varbrough, Cornelia Elliott . . Durham 
Zi.M.MERMAN. John C. . St. Matthews, S. C. 



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VARSITY CUB 
To/i Roil-: Adams, Api'I.ewhue, Bknseit. Bivess, Boiicii. Hrlmmut, Brlton. SiconJ Rovi: 
Bunting, Candeer, Carper, Cole, Crankord, Doxev. Third Roii:: Eanes, Ei.more, Ervin, 
FiNLEV, Fui.p, CJarren. Goode. Fourth Roiv: Greene, Hami.in, Georce Hatcher, R. L. 
Hatcher, Hollingsworth, Hoi.ton, Hovvei.i.. Fifl/i Roiu: Hunter, Jennings. Johnson, Kei.i.v. 
Max, Pearce, Peeler. Sixth Roiv: Rankin. Rohers, Smith, Saint Amani), Thorne, Tutile, 
Weaiherbv. Hnitom Roix-: Weaver, Winecokk, Woodward. 



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Gibbons 



Thornton Hatcher, Leader 



Glassie 



Todd 



Cheer Leaders 

Hanes Field . . . mid-afternoon . . . autumn coolness . . . surging masses of 
frantic men and women . . . colorful dresses . . . streaming pennants ... a 
sudden tenseness grips the throng. Two strong teams are fighting out there. A crucial moment 
has come. Can the Blue and White come through? But look! What is that? Five white-clad 
figures in front of the stands! A moment of hushed silence, and then ... In the history 
of glorious Duke victories, let the part that these fighting Cheer Leaders have played never he 
forgotten I 

The athletic council is a body composed of alumni, faculty and students, in whose hands 
lies the direction of athletics at Duke. It awards letters, elects managers, and in oth:r ways 
supervises athletics. 

Members 

From the Faculty 

W. H. Wannamaker R. N. Wilson 

James DeHart, Ex-Ojfieio 

From the Alumni 

M. A. Brigcs, '09 R. M. Gantt, '09 

R. E. Thigpen, '22 

From the Student Body 
R. B. Bruton, '28 Roy Hunter, '29 



H. G. Hedrick, 'ii 



John Jankoski, '30 



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Athletic Coaches, 1927-28 



The coai'li iij; ^tatf rcmaiiu'd intact this war with Head Coaih 
Jiiiitnic Ofllart fiitfrinn his second year as footliall coach. Alily 
assisted by Line Coach I'ilsoii. he put out a team \v;irthy of iiujch 
praise. Realizing that to gain prestige a team must play large 
institutions, he scheduled games with the Navy, Hoston College 
and Washington and Lee. The Freshmen were again coached 
liy Edd e Cameron, assisted li> Curly SauTulcrs, law student and 
former Washington and Lee player. The results of their season 
were very encouraging and the varsity should gain some very 
gcod men for the coming year. Steiner retunu-d as trainer, and 
much credit is due him for the physical condition of the team. 

The Cross Country team, coached hy Huiheit, was runiier-up 
in the state. I'ucheit also continues in the capacity of haskethall 
and track coach At the time this is written, basketball practice 
is jur.t beginning, and much hope is held for a very successful 
season. This is also true in regard to track. 

The baseball season is still in the offing at th's time, but tall 
practice, held under Coach Cleorge Whitted, promised big things 
in the spring. This is Whitted's third year as baseball coach 
and h; has endeared himself to the hearts of all who play under 
him. The fact that he has become manager of the Durham Kulls has caused some rumor of his retiring 
as the Blue Devil coach, but this rumor has not, at this time, been confirmed. 

I'nder the supervi ion of Tex Tilsnn, boxing and wrestling have taken a place in the sun at Puke. 
Several intercollegiate meets have been scheduled for the year in both sports, and the results of these 
meets should be encouraging. 

Coach White continues his work with the tennis team, while Caudill returns as swimming coach. The 
pa t record of these two coaches speaks for itself ai il this year will be a repetition of the past, we feel 
sure. 




Coach J.\mks DrHart 
Dirrdor of Allili-lics 




Whitted 



Cameron 



BUCHEIT 



Tn.soN' 



Steixer 



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Captain "Cocky" Bennett 



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Garren 
Mana(itr 



Al.l.EV 

Half bach 



CillDI Kh\ 

Ilaljhack 



THE SEASON 



Pre-season dope listed Duke University's Blue Devils 
as an unknown quantity in the state. The fact that 
several outstanding players had come up from the fresh- 
man team encouraged the followers of the Blue and 
White and was the cause for much optimism. Nor were 
the optimists to be disappointed. Two of the men, Buie 
aifd Jankoski, who played their first year on the varsity, 
were chosen for the all-state team. Although Duke 
won only four out of the nine games played, the sched- 
ule was one of the hardest faced bv a North Carolina 



team. When we consider that the Blue Devils scored 
on every team played except Carolina we again are 
well satisfied. 

The season opened with Furman replacing Guilford, 
at Durham. Led by Whitey Rawls, the Purple Hurri- 
cane emerged victorious, 13-7. Duke presented one of 
the hardest driving teams seen on Hanes Field in many 
years. The 19 to 5 first downs served to prove that 
they could gain ground. Buie and Jankoski began their 
stellar work which was to gain for them so much pub- 




J.ANKosKi Through Line 







BuiE 
Quarterback 



Jankoski 
Fullback 



Lake 
Halfback 



Adams 
Halfback 



licity and make for them a berth on the all-state team. 

On October the first, Duke left the Sunny South and 
journeyed to Boston to meet Boston College. Doped to 
lose, fans in the South were startled and pleased to hear 
that Duke had won by the score of 25 to 9. Playing 
in weather that was much to their liking, the team 
could not be stopped. Jankoski drove across for four 
touchdowns, made possible by his own spectacular play- 
ing as well as the Buie-Adams passing combination. 
Adams presented the feature of the game in a sixty 
yard return of a kick. The line was impenetrable, as 
it was in practically all of the games played. 

Again playing in a strange territory, Duke lost to 



Washington and Lee October 8 by a small margin of 
12 to 7. The wet field seemed to handicap the Buie- 
Adams passing combination as well as the driving of 
Jankoski. The Blue Devils held the upper hand 
throughout the first half but seemed to lose their power 
in the latter half. Jankoski, Buie and Adams played 
true to form, while Thompson and Culp did their share 
in the line. 

The Blue Devils hit their stride on October 15 and 
ran an<l passed their way to a 72-0 victory over Rich- 
mond I'uiversity. Smarting from the 9-7 defeat of last 
year, the team could not be stopped. Jankoski scored 
three more touchdowns on his march to high score 




Band Between Halves 





Clip 
Tackle 



Kei.i.v 
End 





TllORNE 

Guard 



honors in the state and South with eighteen touchtiowns. 
To mention the out^tanclinK plavers of the Raiiie wonhl 
be to mention the whole team. Too much cainiot be 
said, however, of the work of Bule, Adams and Jan- 
koski in the hackfield, and Warren, Captain Bennett, 
Thompson and Kelly in the line. Adams led the scor- 
ing for the day with six touchdowns, most of which 
were the result of brilliant passes from Buie to Adams. 
The first five minutes of the Navy game at Annapolis 
on October 22 were bad ones for the Midshipmen. Re- 
ceiving the ball from the kickoflf, the Blue Devils rushed 
the ball across for the first score of the game in about 



half a dozen plays. Not dismayed, however, Navy 
came back strong and won 32-6. Concentrating a high- 
powered attack around Lloyd and Clifton, the Midship- 
men could not be stopped. Peeler and Weathrrby, sub- 
stituting for Kelly and I'hompson, showed up well. The 
backtield was there with the goods also, but their work 
could not compensate for the line weaknesses. Fol- 
lowers of Duke were well pleased, however, that we 
were able to score against a team standing as high in 
football circles as Navy does. 

October 29 was a banner day fur Duke when W. F. 
fell before a versatile attack, 32-6. 'Fhis was the first 




i^^aimH 



Adams Breaks Loose 





Weaver 
Halfback 



HOLLINGSWORTH 
Ouarterhack 





defeat Duke has administered a member of the Big 
Five in three years, and such a defeat it was! Duke's 
game was purely a line-plunging game, since thirteen 
of Buie's attempted eighteen passes were grounded. 
The backfield, playing behind a line that was ir- 
resistible, worked as a unit to score five touchdowns. 
Hollingsworth and Godfrey showed that their driving 
ability was to be feared, while Hatcher sprang into 
the limelight with his brilliant interference work. The 
line from end to end was there in all its glory. 

Led by the versatile Jack McDowall, State College 



handed the Blue Devils a 20-18 defeat on Hanes Field 
in their annual Armistice Day game. Played before 
a crowd estimated at 12,000, it was the game of the 
season in North Carolina. Duke got off to a good start 
with two touchdowns, only to lose by the narrow margin 
of two extra points. It was heart-breaking, but Duke 
fans can gain some consolation in the brand of foot- 
ball played by the team. Jankoski strengthened his 
position for all-state, while Buie shared honors with the 
plunging fullback. The line could not be penetrated, 
but McDowall's pessing and broken field running was 




Warren Rushes Punt 







BOLICH 

Fullback 



Thompson 
Tackle 



Jones 
Guard 



Haumfk 
Halfback 



too much for the Hluc Devils. Thome, who was 
destined to pla_\' every minute of every game, did some 
spectacular work at guard. 

Hitting a slump after the State game, the Blue 
Devils weren't in it and lost to Carolina 18-0 on Novem- 
ber 19. The line did not charge, and the backfield 
could not gain consistently, while Carolina's team was 
able to do both. All this spelled defeat for Duke, and 
since there are no alibis, there is no more to be said. 
Culp deserves mention, however, for his work at tackle. 



Sam Buie rose to the height of his teammates, smart- 
ing from the Carolina defeat, to a 48-7 victory over 
Davidson. Hollingsworth, Jankoski, and Buie formed 
a triumvirate that was not to be resisted either on the 
ground or in the air. Spicing their attack with passes. 
end runs and line plunges, the Presbyterians were kept 
guessing and were continually on the defensive. Brum- 
mitt and Hunter, alternating at center, showed up well, 
while Hatcher continued his good work as interference 
man. 




Bennett in Air 






Brummitt 

Center 



Eanes 
Guard 



Peeler 
End 




No resume of the season would be complete withovit 
some mention of the players individually. Captain 
Bennett gained much fame through his work on the 
park, while Thorne, playing every minute of the season, 
deserves much praise. Thompson, Kelly, Bennett, 
Weaver and Culp, playing their last season for the 
Blue Devils, continued the brand of football that has 
gained for them the reputation they hold in the state. 



Thompson again made all-state, while Culp was men- 
tioned by many. Buie, Adams, Jankoski, Lake, Hatcher 
and Hnllingsvvorth share the credit in the backficld 
and will next year be watched by fans throughout the 
state. Brummitt, Hunter and Jones will be in the line 
again next year and are expected to continue the bril- 
liant work they demonstrated throughout the past 
season. 




Jankoski Off Tackle 



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Freshman Football 




FRKSH.MAN FOOTBALL SQUAD 

Under the tutorship of Coach Eddie Cameron, the Duke Freshmen won three Rames, lost 
two and tied one. With the discovery of such men as Staton, Murray, Rosky and Hayes, plus 
the three wins, the season may be termed successful. 

In the first game of the season the Oak Ridce eleven won by a 13 to 6 score. For three 
years this game had resulted in a tie, and only by hard playing was Oak Ridge able to win. 

Meeting the Carolina Freshmen for the first time, the Hlue Imps played them to a 6 to 6 
tie. The playing of Murray and the work of the line stood out for Ouke. 

Wake Forest, boasting of a state championship Freshman team, fell before the Oukc Fresh- 
men. The win was by a margin of one lone point, the final score being 7 to 6. 

The Freshman eleven ran wild over the Davidson Wild Kittens, winning 18 to o. The 
backfield ran and passed its way to three touchdowns while the line effectively stopped any 
advances by the Davidson team. 

With the State Championship at stake, the Duke Freshmen weakened and allowed State to 
win, 7 to o. The Blue Imps threatened to score, but each time the State team tightened and 
held them for downs. 

In their annual trip to Newport News the Freshmen ran wild to defeat the Apprentice 
School 18 to o. The work of Murray and Staton in the Backfield was the stellar performance 
of the game. The line also held well, thwarting any serious threats to score. 

The following men composed the Freshman football squad: 

E. E. Adkins Roland Havnes 

A. W. Carpenter E. T. Knowles 

P. F. CoRTE John Meyers 

Ivo Cunningham W. D. Murray 

J. T. C.OBBLE T. F. Osborne 

R. B. Harris O. B. Peery 

Bob Hayes D. H. Puthuff 



J. M. RlITENBERC 

Marcus Rosky 
C. E. Rupp 
w. w. schofield 
Jarrett Staton 
T. {;. Taylor 

C. H. WiNSLOW 



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BuCHEiT, Coach 



BlVENS, Manaijcr 



Brummiit 



Weaver 




Jankoski 



Basketball, 1928 

D. Kei.i.v, Captain H. L. Biven'S, Manager 

G. BucHEiT, Coach 

Thp pre-season dope placed Duke in the forefront 
among the state teams. This was not due to the re- 
turn of many letter men, but to the four sophomores 
who had made such a name for themselves the year 
before. Nor were these men. Councilor, Werber, Far- 
ley and Jankoski, to disappoint us. In company with 
Captain Kelly, these men carried Duke into a tie for 
second place in the state. After the injury to Captain 
Kelly toward the end of the season, Candler very 
capably filled his place and did much to give Duke 
the many victories she won. Weaver, Bennett and 
Rogers, three seniors, although not playing regularly, 
did great work for the Blue Devils. 

In two practice ganies before the opening of the 
regular col'egiate season, Duke defeated the Greens- 
boro "Y". 53 to 27, and the Rocky Mount ■■Y." 81 to 
14. Werber and Councilor, playing th^ir sixth year 
together, proved that they could find the basket and 
ran up some astounding scores. 

Opening the collegiate season on January 11, 1928, 
Dukp trimmed the Davidson Wildcats, 41 to 27, in 
their own lair. This game only served to prove more 
decisively that Duke had a team that could score. 
Throughout the season all five men were a constant 
threat to their opponents. 

The next night Duke took on the University of 
South Carolina, in Columbia, and emerged victorious, 
39 to 32, Werber and Councilor starred for the Devils. 

In a close and exciting game the Duke quint de- 
feated N. C. State 32 to 29 in the Memorial Gym- 
nasium. This ran the Blue Devils' list of successive 
victories up to five, and the future looked bright. 

In the sixth game of the season, the University of 
Georgia suffered a 49 to 44 defeat at the hands of the 
Duke five. Two extra periods were necessary and those 
who saw the game can vouch for the fact that it was 
nerve-racking. 

Waki' Forest was the seventh team to bow to the 
fast and accurate shooting Duke aggregation. Play- 
ing in the State Gym, the team easily emerged vic- 
torious, 45 to 17. 




Candler 



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Farley 






Werber 



Councilor 



Bevn'ptt 



Kelly 



As February 4 drew near, Duke followers talked 
much. "Can we beat Carolina?" was tin-; tiuestioii 
asked on all sides. The answer eanie in the negative 
when Carolina handed Duke a 27 to 14 defeat on that 
night. 

The Blue Devils next journeyed to Virginia and 
returned with the scalps of V. P. I. and Washington 
and Lee. On February 7, the team won a close game 
from the former, 34 to 31. The next night they 
handed the latter a 53 to 41 defeat. The whole team, 
led l»y Captain Kelly, played superior ball. 

He turning to North Carolina, Duke again met the 
Flying Phantoms from Chapel Hill. Playing before thi- 
largest crowd ever assembled In the Meniorial Gym. 
the Blue Devils fought a good fight only to lose, 31! 
to 23. The Carolina team was too tall and too ex- 
perienc-ed for the youthful Duke quint. Candler, sub- 
stituting for Kelly, played a splendid game. 

On February 14, Wake Forest threw a scare into 
the Duke camp by holding them to a 37 to 34 score. 
Forcfd to the limit, however, the Devils came through 
with the goods. 

Taking their second trip North, the Blue Devils 
suffered a 4 4 to 34 defeat at the hands of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia and a 56 to 39 defeat by George- 
town. Experience and height were again largely re- 
sponsible for our loss. 

Tired out by a long trip, the Blue Devils lost to 
N. C. State at Raleigh February 20 by a score of 37 
to 27. Having defeated State earlier in the season, 
this forced Duke Into a tie with her for second place 
in the state. 

On February 22, Duke closed her season by hand- 
ing t>avidson a 51 to 33 defeat in the Memorial Gym. 
Led by Candler and Werber as high scorers, the eniiro 
team played good ball. 

With the close of the season we can look back 
with much to be proud of. Last season seven games 
were tost in the state, while this year only three were 
dropped to opponents. A glance into the future also 
cau.ses muih oritimism. With such men a.s Councilor, 
Werher. Farley. Candler and Jankoski to build aroun<l. 
we should have an even more successful .seasnn next 
year. Weaver. Bennett. Rogers and Kelly closi;d their 
careers on the hardwood floor, and though all but 
Kelly were forced into the background somewhat by 
the four sophomores, their work during the last four 
years is deserving of much credit. 




Rogers 



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To[i Roiv: WiDENHOuSE, Rogers, Schi.ossbach 
MiJJle Row. AuKiNs, Staton, Alford, Murray 
Boltom Row. Havnes, Dorsev, Crouch 

Fresliman Basketball, 1928 



State Cham. 

Under the tutorship of Coach Eddie Cameron, the 
Duke Freshmen won five of the seven games plaved. 
Although one game was dropped to the N. C. State 
Freshmen, a subsequent victory over that team gave 
the Freshmen the state championship. Rogers, 
Croson, Schlossbach, and Staton played stellar ball 
throughout the season, and give promise of being 
worthwhile assets to the varsity next year. 

The season opened on January 14, 1928, with 
State in the Memorial (Jymnasium. The game was 
too close for comfort, and when the final whistle 
blew, State held a fi\'e-point lead. The score was 

37 to 32- 

The Blue Imps next took on the Habv Deacons 
from Wake Forest and easily defeated them 49 to 
27. The whole team played well, but the work of 
Rogers deserves special mention. 

The second and last defeat the Imps were to re- 
ceive was at the hands of Oak Ridge. The Ridgers 
in a close game defeated the Duke quintet 37 to 31. 
Schlossbach and Rogers were the stars of the con- 
test. 

When Duke journeyed to Chapel Hill to play the 
Carolina Freshmen soon after the second semester 
opened, they carried a new player in the person of 
Croson. This lad from Washington, D. C, 
measures six feet, three inches in height, and proved 
a worthy asset during the remainder of the season. 



/■IONS, 1928 

The game was hard fought, but the Blue Imps 
emerged victorious, 36 to 33. Croson started things 
off right and, together with Rogers, proved the star 
of the game. 

In a return game the next night the Carolina 
Freshmen suffered a 44 to 30 defeat at the hands 
of the Duke Freshmen. This victory served some- 
what to atone for the defeat of the Duke Varsity 
by the Flying Phantoms the same night. 

Davidson, playing in the Memorial Gymnasium, 
suffered a sound licking at the hands of the Duke 
five. Led by Rogers and Croson, the Blue Imps 
scored fift\-two points while Da\'idson w'as ringing 
up only twenty-four. Croson, b\' his work at cen- 
ter and his ability to get the ball off the back- 
board, was easily the outstanding player of the 
game. 

Duke closed the season by avenging the defeat 
by the N. C. State Freshmen early in the season 
and turned in a 42 to 34 victory over this team. 
Croson and Rogers again were the outstanding 
players of the game. 

The following men made up the Blue Imps' squad 
and are all worth\' of mention: Rogers, Croson, 
Moore, Crouch, Schlossbach, Dorsev, Statcn, Haynes, 
Widenhouse, Fulp and Murray. With the nucleus 
to build around that we already have, these men 
should make next year a banner season in basketball. 



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WmiTED 

Coach 



Weaver 
First Base 



C'APTAIV ThOMPCON" 

I'ililur 



Saunders 

Third flasr 



Baseball Resume, 1927 

Joe Thompson Cupluin 

Andrew Kirby Manager 

George VVhitted Coach 

With a strong staff of pitchers and a group of experienced players, the ^')2^ season opened 
auspiciously for the Duke team. Nor had the varsity failed to draw some promising players 
from the freshman team. Wyrick, Hollingsworth, Adams and McCarthy were to prove valuahle 
assets to the team. 

The season opened on the home ground with Washington and Lee as opposition. The Duke 
pitchers were unable to quiet the heavy hitting Washington and Lee batters, and as a result we 
lost both games by scores of 9 to 6 and 6 to 4. 

On April 4 the Blue Devils met Davidson in the first state game. The Davidson pitchers 
were sadly lacking, and Duke won, 10 to 5. Cireene, W>rick, Wea\'er and Johnson all hit the 
ball for circuits. 

In an exhibition game played at El Toro Park, the Durham Bulls handed Duke a 9 to 2 de- 
feat. The professional players were a little too experienced for the Blue Devils. 

Wake Forest was the next state team to fall a victim to the Duke team. With Johnsfin pitch- 
ing an air-tight game, the Blue Devils won, 5 to 2. Cirecne and Hollingsworth were the hitting 
stars of the game, each one getting two. 

On April 14 the Pennsylvania State diamond artists visited Duke and won a close game, 10 
to 9. Hits were divided equally between the two teams, each getting twelve. Coach Whitted 
used four pitchers in an attempt to stem the tide. Captain Thompson turned in two hits for 
the home team. 

April 16 saw another Pennsylvania team on the Duke diamond. The I'niversity of Penn- 
sylvania came down and handed Duke a 12 to 6 defeat. Ihe Pennsylvania batters gathered in 
seventeen safe knocks off Jones, Leight and Bennett, while the Devil batsmen were getting nine. 

141 







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T ' LT^W ^ W' ' ^ ' ^S'mB 'f 





Thomas 
Pitcher 



Adams 
Second Base 



Greene 
Outfield 



'#, ■■"•!' 



Johnson 
Pitcher 



The Durham Bulls furnished the Easter Monday opposition and won a ten-inning game 3 to 2. 
Bimting and Adams gathered two hits apiece of their team's eight hits, while the Bulls hit Ben- 
nett for thirteen safe knocks. The Blue Devils suffered a loss, however, that was to seriously 
injure the team. Hollingsworth was hit in the eye during infield practice and suffered an almost 
total loss of his eyesight. He was unable to engage in any more games during the season. 

On April 19 the Blue Devils met Carolina at El Toro Park. Johnson took the mound for 
the Duke team and pitched excellent ball. Duke put the game on ice in the fifth inning by scor- 
ing seven runs, and the final score was 8 to 7. Bunting and Rowe hit the ball twice each for 
safeties. 

The next day the Blue Devils journeyed to Fayetteville to meet Carolina again. Leight 
worked on the mound the whole game and yielded sixteen hits and ten runs, while the Duke 
diamond artists were gathering only five hits and one run. This left these two teams with one 
win each and with one more game to play. 

On April 21 Duke again decisively beat the Wildcats 11 to i. Thomas pitched an airtight 
game, yielding only five hits and holding them scoreless until the final inning. The Blue Devils 
h.t them all over the field for fourteen safeties. Saunders turned in three hits while Thompson, 
McCarthy, Weaver and Adams all hit safely twice each. 

With Johnson working well on the mound, the Blue Devils defeated North Carolina State 
5 to 3 on April 23. Although State hit safely seven times, Johnson kept them well scattered. 
Saunders, all-state third baseman, again hit the ball for three safeties. 

In a return engagement with North Carolina State, Duke administered another defeat by a 
7 to 4 score. The hitting of Saunders and Adams, and the close fielding of the whole team made 
this win possible. 

The team then left on their annual northern tour. They first met the University of Mary- 
land, winning 7 to 4. In the second game of the trip the Blue Devils met a sound trouncing 
at the hands of Georgetown. The pitchers were ineffective, and many errors on the part of the 
team resulted in a 12 to i defeat. V. P. I. next won a close game by the score of 6 to 5. 

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1928 BASEBALL SQIAD 

Top Raiu: Hewitt, Manager, Hawkixs, Thomas, Joiin'SOK, Kist[.er, WmriKi), Coach. Middle 
Row. Warrek, Bei.ue, Fari.ev, Werber, Uean, Allen. Bottom Row. Weaver, Hollings- 

woRiii, Jenkins, Mukrav, Adams, Barker. 



Returning to Hancs Field the Blue Devils met the Demon Deacons and lost, 9 to 6. The 
visiting pitcher kept the Duke hits well scattered, while his team mates were bunching theirs to 
score nine earned runs. 

In the final game of the season Carolina put the state championship on ice li.v winning 6 to 4. 
Loose pitching and untimely errors played a large part in this defeat. 



How THE Bi.i E Devils Hit: 
.1.11. 



Player — 

Jones 4 

Johnson 21 

Greene 68 

Thomas 17 

Saunders 68 

Bunting 43 

Thompson 38 

McCarthy 43 

hollingsworth 11 

Adams 61 

Weaver 71 

\\'vrick 55 

Broome 44 



II. 


/'</. 


2 


.500 


9 


.429 


2+ 


•353 


6 


353 


23 


339 


14 


326 


12 


3.6 


12 


279 


3 


273 


'5 


246 


<7 


239 


■3 


236 


8 


iSi 



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Resume of Freskman Baseball, 
1927 

The 1927 Freshman baseball season resulted in a clean slate, not a 
single defeat being suffered by the Blue Imps. Helue bore most of the 
burden of pitching and made a name for himself in that field. Peeler also 
pitched excellent ball, and these two men give great promise for the 
future. 

The infield, composed of Jenkins, who also pitches, at first; Dean at 
second, Werber at short, and Farley (until he was injured) at third, was 
airtight. They played ball that would do credit to any varsity team, 
and this season will no doubt find these men holding regular positions 
with the Blue Devils. Kistler in the outfield made a name for himself 
by hitting the ball for circuits in practically every game of the season. 
Mason, Luquire, Buie, Warren and Hawkins also pla\'ed well for the 
Blue Imps. 

A complete record of the season could not be obtained, but the fol- 
lowing four games are fair samples of the season. On April 15, the Blue 
Imps defeated Oak Ridge 4 to 3 in a close game. In this game Farley 
suffered a knee injury that was to keep him out of the game for the re- 
mainder of the season. Kistler, true to form, hit a home run. 

In a hit and run affair the Duke Freshmen won from Davidson 21 
to 5 on April 29. Davidson used three pitchers, but to no avail, the Blue 
Imps gathering twenty-one hits. Warren, Hawkins and Belue turned in 
three safe hits apiece. 

While Belue was holding the Wolf Cubs to three hits and one run, 
the Duke Freshmen were gathering twelve hits and eleven runs. Werber 
and Luquire gathered three hits each. 

On May 5, Belue held the Carolina Tar Babies to two hits and two 
runs. In the meantime his team mates scored five earned runs as a result 
of eleven hits. 

With the return of practically every freshman player, much hope is 
held out for a state championship team this year. 



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Track Resume. 1927 

W. H. Ervin Capiuin 

E. H. Bunting Manager 

G. C. BucHEiT Coach 



Nineteen twenty-seven was a banner year for track, and resulted not niilv in victories over 
every state team save Carolina, but the establishment of thirteen new schncil records. These 
records and their holders are as follows: 

H. Ervin — loo-yard dash lo seconds - 

R. Bruton — loo-yard dash lo seconds 

H. Ervin — 220-yard dash 22 3-5 seconds 

J. L. Woodward — 880-yard run 2 minutes 

R. G. TuiTLR — two-mile ... 10 minutes, 6 2-5 seconds 
J. L. Woodward — one mile . . 4 mirmtes, 39 2-5 seconds 

H. Ervin — 220 low hurdles 26 3-5 seconds 

B. Brantley — 120 high hurdles .... 16 1-5 seconds 

F. Brlmmitt — shot put 40 feet, 7!> inches 

B. Brantley — pole vault 12 fett, 2 inches 

G. Beverley — high jump . ... 6 feet, one-half inch 

J. Cliff — broad jump 21 feet, 11', j inches 

Distance medley relay ... 8 minutes, 25 1-5 seconds 

University of Richmond Indoor Meet 

Competing against the best teams in North Carolina 
and Virginia, Duke took third place in an indoor meet 
held at the Ciiiversity of Richmond in February. Tuttle 
showed all competition his heels on the two-mile and won 
it easily. 

Duke 62^; Carolina 63^/^ 

In a nerve-wracking, heart-breaking meet held March 
26, 1927, Carolina won by the narrow margin of one 
point. Ervin was high scorer of the meet, winning a first 
place in the 100-yard dash, the 220 low hurdles, the 220- 
yard dash, and a second place in the 44o-yar(l dash. He 
scored a total of eighteen of the points. Pcgram won the 
440-yard dash and \^'oodw■ard won the 880-yard run. 
Brantley easily won the pole vault and established his 
supremacy in that field in the state. 




Cai'iain "Bld'' Ervin 



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Duke 75; Washington and Lee 51 

On April 2, 1927, Duke easily defeated the cinder track adherents from Washington and 
Lee. First places were taken by Bruton in the lOO-yard dash, Woodward in the mile run, Tuttle 
in the two-mile run. Woodward in the 880-yard run, Brummitt in the shot put, Bennett in the 
javelin throw, and Brantley and Beal tied for first in the pole vault. This stinging defeat served 
to avenge the Blue Devils for a 70 to 56 defeat of the previous year. 

Duke ioo; Wake Forest 26 

Scoring a round hundred points, Duke gave Wake Forest a sound defeat on April 12, 1927. 
Bruton did some beautiful running to win the 100-yard and 220-yard dashes. Tuttle and Wood- 
ward reversed the order of their victories in the Washington and Lee meet, Tuttle winning the 
one-mile and Woodward winning the two-mile run. Brantley, without any exertion at all, won 
the pole vault. First places were also turned in by Brummit in the shot put and discus throw, 
and Litaker in the 880-yard run. 

The Davidson meet which was to have come next was rained out. This was regretted by 
many of the trackmen, since it offered an opportunity to score many points. 

Duke 76 1-3; North Carolina State 49 2-3 

In one of the prettiest meets of the season Duke won from North Carolina State in Raleigh 
on Mav 3. Again Duke was gaining sweet revenge for a 64 to 62 defeat sufferedi the year be- 
fore. Woodward ran wild to turn victories in the half-mile and mile runs. Tuttle also was in 
the best of form and easily won the two-mile. Brantley, true to form, won the pole vault and, 
not content with this, he also took first place in the high hurdles. Bruton emerged victorious in 
the 100-yard dash and Ervin in the 220-yard dash. Brummitt won the shot put and Bennett the 
javelin throw. 

Georgia Tech Relay 

By virtue of their victory in the distance medley relay Duke took eighth place in a meet of 
the best teams of the South. 

State Meet 

Duke again suffered defeat, being forced to take second place with a total score of 49>4. 
Carolina won easily with 71^2 points scored. Brantley couldn't be stopped in the pole vault, and 
he established a new state record of 12 feet, 2 inches. Woodward also turned in a first place 
in the 88o-yar(l run. 

In the meets Woodward was high scorer for the season, turning in a total of 43ji points. 
Ervin ran him a close second with 38^4 points. Following these men came Bruton and Brum- 
mitt with thirty-three points each and Brantley with thirty-one points. The season as a whole 
was successful, and much promise is held for the present season. As this is written Tuttle and 
Woodward have just returned from an indoor meet at the University of Richmond with victories 
in the two-mile and one-mile runs. 

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Resume of the Season, 1926-27 

W. S. Rogers Captain 

\V. B. NKwnoi.i) Mamujtr 

Dr. N. I. White Coach 

"With the return of Whisnant to study law, and with such men as Burns, UoKfi's, and Haryrave 
in the academir school, the 1927 tennis season gave promise of being a smci-ssful one. Whisnant had 
made a name for himself as an undergraduate, and was to nialie for himself a gr'-ater name before 
the season was over. 

The Blue Devils successfully met and defeated six opponents during tlie season. In the state 
tournament Whisnant won the state singles championship, removing the crown from his team male, 
Rogers, who held this title the year before. The doubU-s team, composed of Burns and WHilsnant, 
were also runners-up for the state doubles championship. 

The season opened with Carolina, and the result was a 4 to 3 victory for tin- Blue Devils. The 
playing of Whisnant, Burns, and Rogers was the feature of the meet. 

After this meet the team left for a trip through the Old Dominion Statf. They first nn-t V. P. I., 
and whitewashed them nicely by a 7 to score. Kvery meinbi-r of the team played wi-11. Ilargrave, 
Holton, and Ervin demonstrating some real tennis ability-. AIth«niKh the n»'Xt meet did not result in a 
whitewash, it missed it only by one match. The University of Virginia netmcn wen- the next to fall 
before the onslaught of the Blue Devils by a fi to 1 score. 

Returning to North Carolina, the Devil netmen engaged Wake Forest in two mei-ts. winning the 
first 7 to and the second 6 to 1. In both meets the entire team acquitted themselves well. 

In the last dual meet of the season the Duke team won from Carolina, 5 to 4. Burns and Whisnant 
were there with the goods, winning their singles matches, and later, playing together, they turned (n 
a win in tlie doubles. 

Entering the state meet, held at Chapel Hill, Whisnant copped the singles championship against 
strong opposition. Burns and Whisnant lo.'^t to the Davidson doubles team in the finals after defeat- 
ing all other opposition. The season might well be termed very successful, and the team will suffer 
greatly from the loss of such men as Burns and Whisnant, 




Hargrave, Whisnant, Blrns, Rogers, Captain, I.. Ervin, P. Ervin, Newboid, Manager. 



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CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

BucHEiT, Coach, Owens, Tuttle, Doxev, Winecoff, Woodward, 

Harris, Manager 

Cross-Country 

J. L. Woodward Captain 

A. P. Harris, Jr Manager 

G. C. BucHEiT Coach 

Although the 1927 cross-country team had only five consistent runners, the season was very 
successful. Under the leadership of Captain Woodward they ran to four victories and to second 
place in the state. 

The season opened with Washington and Lee on the Duke course. Washington and Lee had 
won the year before, and the Duke harriers were anxious for victory. The result was a decisive 
victory for Duke. The Blue Devils won, 19 to 36, Woodward, Tuttle, Doxey and WinecofI cross- 
ing the finish line before a Washington and Lee man came in. 

The next meet was a runaway for Duke, and Davidson was defeated, 15 to 43. The five 
Duke runners placed first in the following order: Woodward, Tuttle, Doxey, Winecoff and Owens. 

Carolina next ran to a 37 to 20 victory over Duke on their home course. With such men as 
Elliot, Henderson and Pritchard to compete with, the Duke runners could not stand the pace. 
This was the only defeat of the season for Duke in a dual meet. 

Stinging from the defeat administered them by Carolina, the Blue Devils decisively defeated 
North Carolina State 18 to 37. Again the Duke harriers placed the first four men — Woodward, 
Tuttle, Doxey and Winecoff. 

On Thanksgiving Day the team journeyed to Atlanta to engage in an invitation meet at Emory 
University. They returned with the scalps of Emory, Birmingham-Southern, and all other par- 
ticipants in the meet, having taken first place in the meet with a score of fifteen points. The 
whole team ran wild and took the first five places. 

Due to the injury of Captain Woodward, Duke hardly won second place in the state meet held 
in Raleigh. The one redeeming feature of the meet, however, was the victory of Tuttle over 
all contestants entered. Carolina's pride as well as score suffered much from this, and Tuttle 
wrote his name in Duke's Athletic Hall of Fame. 



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Wrestling, 1928 

H. CULP Caflain 

G. V. Fui.p Manat/i-r 

Tex Tilson Coach 



This article is written just after the final wrestling meet of the season when Duke's pride in 
the team is at its height. The season has placed Duke as undisputed champion of the state and 
of the South, and as possible contenders for the national championship. Her claim to the South- 
ern championship is the result of decisive victories over all the outstanding teams of the South. 
Her claim to the national title is based on her defeat of Navy and \ . M. I., formerly nat'onal 
champions. 

Captain Culp finished his wrestling season in a blaze of glory resting on the laurels of All- 
Southern unlimited weight champion. During his wrestling career Culp has never lost a match, 
and only once has he been underneath his opponent. Jones, in the 175-pnund class, finished the 
1928 season without losing a match and, as this article is written, plans arc materializing to send 
these two men to the National Intercollegiate Matches in Iowa to contend for national champion- 
ships later in the spring. \ictor!es there would place them directly in line for the Olympic games 
to be held this summer in Amsterdam, Holland. We can only hope for them success in this meet. 

The Duke team lost the first match to Franklin and Marshall by a close score. This school 
engages in minor sports only, and much emphasis is placed on wrestling. Culp, Starnes and Jones 
turned in victories for the Blue Devils. 

The grapplers next journeyed to .Xnnapnlis to take on the strong midshipman team. Hopes 
of victory were slight, but the Blue Devils more than doubled the score, turning in a 17 to 8 
victory. In this match Captain Culp thre^v the middies' pride, Wilson, and placed himself among 
the ranks of the contenders for the national championship. 

The Blue Devils began their state contests by winning from North Carolina State by the 
decisive score of 22 to 3. State was forced to content themselves with one time decision. 



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First Row. Applewhite, St. Am and, Goode, Ervin 

Second Row. Starnes, Gay, Ei.more, Carper 

Thiiil Row. Warren, McCotter, Coi.e 

Fourth Row. Jennings, Captain Cui.p, Bunting, Williams, Jones 

Fijtii Row. TiLSON, Coach, VvLV, Manager 



On February ii the Duke grapplers handed the Carolina matmen a 24 to 3 defeat. Duke 
won six of the seven matches, three by time decisions and three by falls. Culp, Cole and Apple- 
white pinned their men, while Goode, Jones, and Starnes won by time advantages. 

The march toward the Southern championship continued on the Blue Devils' trip through 
Virginia. Culp, Jones, and Goode won by falls, and Starnes and Applewhite turned in time 
decisions to give the team a 21 to 6 victory over the V. M. I. cadets. Before the match V. M. I. 
was one of the most formidable contenders for the Southern championship. 

Coach Tilson next sent his team against his old Alma Mater, Washington and Lee. The 
Blue Devils whitewashed the W. and L. grapplers, 29 to o. Jones, Goode, Cole, and Applewhite 
won by the fall route. Culp, Jennings, and Starnes won time decisions. 

In the last meet of the season Duke dished out a 20 to 3 defeat to Davidson. In only one 
match did Davidson take the offensive, and in this match Jennings forced Captain Garrison 
into an extra period before a time decision was gained by Davidson. Applewhite, Cioode, Cole, 
Starnes, and Jones all won by decisive time decisions. Captain Culp, not satisfied to let the 
match end without a fall, and wishing to close his career in a blaze of glory, pinned Baker of 
Davidson in a little over four minutes. 

Championship teams at Duke have been scarce, but the Blue Devil grapplers have done much 
to spread her name over the South and over the nation. 



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Resume of Boxing, 1928 



H. CuLP Captain 



H. HoWKi.l Manat/rr 



Tex Tii.soK 



Coach 



Umler the tutorship of foat-h Tex Tilso-i nu«iiuilt'feiatf boxiiifi was this yiar introilurc-d at Duke 
I''niversity. At the time this is written the mittnu-n have partiripated in lour nuets, winning two 
and losing two. One more ungaKoment, with the University of South Carolina, is scheduled, and 
Duke stands a good chance of winning. With the growing intetest that is being manifested in this 
sport, boxing bids fair to be one of the mo^t popular sports of the campus. Next year should see 
more' victories chalked up for the Blue Devils also. 

The season opened with Carolina, and Duke lost decisively by a score of 6 to 1. Rankin turned 
in the only victory for the Blue Devils. 

Again meeting Carolina in the second engagement of the season Duke lost, fi to 1. St. Amand, 
scrappy 115-pound clas.? man. won a decision over Coley of Carolina. Smith. Carper. Warren and 
Culp lost by decisions, while Pummings of Carolina won a technical knockout over Hardaway. 

The Blue Devil mittmen were not content to -stay in the losing column, and the University of 
Georgia suffered a 5 to 2 defeat at Duke's hands. St. Amand. Warren and Ctilp turned in victories 
by way of decisions. Carper, 15S-pound class man, floored Mitchell of Georgia for the count of 
ten in thirty seconds after the bout began. 

The team next journeyed to South Carolina to engage the leather pushers there. The result was 
a 4 to 3 victory. A return engagement is scheduled with this team, and a more decisive victory 
is promised bv the Blue Devils. 

Losing only one man by graduation. Coach Tilson will have six letter men to start work with 
next season. 




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First Rov:: Max, Smith, St. Amand, Warren 
Second Row. Gav, Captain Clt.p, Rankin, Carper 
Third Roii:: Tli.soN, Coach, HowEi.i,, Manager. 

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Top Row. Coach R. H. Caudill, "Fish" Earnhardt, "Ham" Hannah, V. B. Derrickson, 
T. W. Atwood, J. J. Sullivan, Manager. SrionJ Row. L. W. Purdv, Lanbis Ben- 
net, Eddie Martin, Herbert Norwick, B. H. Baliohman, W. W. Gotten. First Row. 
J. L. GiBSONj Herbert O'Keefe, Hugh Westbrook, Fred Earnhardt, C. H. Melton, 
Charles Connor, Donald Glassie. 



Sw^immin^, 1928 



Fred Earnhardt Captain J. J. Sullivan Manager 

R. H. Caudill Coach 

Engaging in four intercollegiate contests, the Duke swimmers 
emerged victorious in two and lost two. The season opened with 
Washington and Lee in the home pool. This was the first intercollegiate 
swimming meet ever held in the Duke pool. The Devil fishes showed up 
well, but lost by a score of 38 to 22. Captain Fred Earnhardt set a new 
pool record for the lOO-yard breast stroke, while "Fish" Earnhardt won 
the 50- and 1 00-yard free style races. 

On February 1 8 the Duke swimmers defeated the University of 
Virginia fishes 39 to 21. Again the Earnhardt brothers were high 
scorers, "Fish" turning in a first place in the 50 and lOO-yard dashes, and 
Fred winning the 200-yard breast stroke. Gibson and Connor by their 
excellent diving won first and second places respectively. 

The Blue Devils next journeyed to Greenville, S. C, where they 
handed Furman University a 52 to 1 1 defeat. From there they invaded 
the far South, losing to Georgia Tech 40 to 21. The Earnhardt brothers 
acquitted themselves well in these two meets, as did Gibson and Connor. 

Active members of the team were Captain Fred Earnhardt, "Fish" 
Earnhardt, Gibson, Connor, Hannah, Brawley, Atwood, Derrickson, 
Bennett and Baughman. 

152 







Organizations 



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PUBLIC71TIONS 




Publication Board 



Officers 



Dr. \V. II. Wanna.viaker . 
Selma Wari.ick .... 



. . . . Chairmitn 
. . . . Secretary 



Members 



Dr. R. L. Flowers 
C. E. Jordan 
R. E. TiiinpEX 



R. I.. Hatcher 
T. S. Eases, Jr. 
Helen Chandler 



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ARCHIVE 





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r' 



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Carsiarphen 



KiRKPATRICK 



TKe ArcKive 

B. B. Carstarphek ^-jjV 



C. A. KiRKPATRICK .... 

Thomas J. Shaw, Jr. . 



. . Business Mitnai/i-r 
. . lir/ok tililor 



Associ.ATE Editors 

John- Paul Lucas Jr. Rebecca Kirkpatrick 

Selma Warlick David II. Thorpe 

Opal Winsiiad 

M.AX.\r,i;RiAi. Stai-k 

R. M. Johnston- W. M. I'pchurch 

J. U. CoNNAi.i.v Francis Hrinklev 

J. I. Morgan 



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Hester Hivkns 

Tne Cnronicle 

II. 1.. IIhsthk hdilor 

II. I,. HiVHNS liusiniss Maiiiujer 

R. H. Ellison' Munai/ini/ tJilor 

A. H. CoTTOV Conlrihulinij EJilor 

B. B. r.ARST.-VRPHE.V C.oiiliiliuliiiii Eililnr 

T. J. Sh.aw, Jr (yintriliiilini/ Edilor 

D. H. Thorpe Conlrihuliii// EJilor 

Heles' Chasolek ('n-Eii EJilor 

T. F. Hewllt Sports Eiiilor 

Rebecc.'\ KiRKP.MRiCK Soiicly EJilor 

Elsie Willi.^mson' "lUuc Embers" Editor 

J. C. Hanes Collcij'ialr Prrss Editor 

Associate Editors 
M. J. Cahill Ken Etta Fultqx Helen Jenkins P. W. Smith 

W. E. DuNSTAN VV. H. Haves Esther Morris Selma Warlick 

Mary Arden Hauss 

Art Editors 
H. L. Lipparo W. B. Culbreth 

Reporters 
J. C. Alexander C. M. Crona H. E. O'Keef V. F. Sechriest 

H. L. Andrews James Hackney R. R. Pearson J. S. Shaw 

J. U. Conally M. K. Henderson Stuart Robeson Robert Williams 

C. H. LiVENGOOD N. Rlbinstein 

BUSIXESS St.aff 

I. E. Harris, Jr Idvrrtisinij Manaijer 

E. S. Raper Circulation Maninjrr 

Elizabeth Miller Caldwell . . . Co-Ed Busituss Manai/rr 

Assist.ants 
Leon Alexander C. S. Murphy William Rousseau Wharton Separk, Jr. 

Joe Mann William Rawls Alton Sadler S. E. Starnes 

Sam Welch 

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Truesdai.i; 



SiMAlllERS 



The Clianticleer 

James N. Truesdale td'ito 

Cecil E. Smathers liusin.ss Maiunjer 

EiMTcjRi.AL Staff 

Edith Parker Co-ed Edittr 

W. Fletcher Nelson Advisory Editor 

A. P. Harris, Jr Sports Editor 

A. H. COTinN Featun- Editor 

R. M. JoMNSTOX Pholotjrapliic Editor 

LisTON- Pope C. F. Hoxevcutt W. 1". Howland 

J. L. Burke H. G. Holt Marv Aruen Hauss 

J. S. Stanley Edwin Life C. K. McCoiter 

W. B. Culbreth H. G. Ruark W. A. Stamiurv 

Louise Parker T. A. Priest Robert Cochrane 

Dorothy Jenneite \V. C. Hauss Ivo Cunningham 

Managerial Staff 

Ethel Taylor, Co-cd Business Manager 
V. R. LiNEBACK C. L. Fair 

Art Staff 

W. B. Farr, .//-/ Editor 
W. B. Culbreth J. M. Dunlap 



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Student Government 

Men's Association 

Officers 

C. C. Weaver President 

J. N. Truesdale Vice-President 

J. T. Carruthers Secretary-Treasurer 

Student Council 

Graduate School 

E. P. McFee 

Class of ig2S 
C. C. Weaver, Cliairman H. L. Hester, Vice-Cliairman 

J. C. BURWEM, 

Class of ig2g 

J. T. Carruthers, Secretary 

A. N. Johnson 

Class of IQSO 
W. M. Werber 



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Women s Student Government Association 

Executive Council 

Ellen Hlickabee I'lrsiJi-m 

Mamie Bridgers I'iic-Prvsidiiii 

Laura Deato.v Sicrilary 

Anita Scarboro Corns l^oiuiiny S,cr,iiiry 

Eunice Stamkv Trrasurcr 

Gladys White Issislanl Tnasurcr 

Maude McCracken .... Toit:n Girl Rrfrisitiliilii'i- 

Council 

Elizabeth McKenzie Senior Class Riprcscntali've 

Mary Arden Hauss Junior Class Rrpresenlaliire 

Alma Wyche Sophomore Class Representative 

Clara Lawixc Freshman Class Represenlali've 

Virginia Stevens Ex-Oljido 

Martha Chesson Vndenjraduale Reprrsenlali-ve 

Edith Parker Cluiinncui of Social Standards Commillee 



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Officers 

Virginia Stevens President 

Leila Hubbaru J'ue-President 

Martha Chesson L'ruteryraduale Representative 

Rachel Williams Secretary 

Eva Malone Treasurer 

Celene Phipps Assistant Treasurer 

Kathrvn Warlick Tnivn Representative 

Ellen Hlickabee Ex-Ojficio 

Committee Chairmen 

Selma Warlick Tespers 

Catherine Mills Program 

Dorothy Jennette Social 

Margaret Rovall Social Service 

Helen Taylor Il'orld Felhtx-sliip 



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Duke University Musical Club 

Officiirs 

J. Foster Barnes Direiior o< Gli-f Cluh 

George E. Leftwich Dirrdnr of Ordu-stras 

Mrs. J. Foster Barnes Snprann. Curst Suloist 

J. N. Truesdale I'lisidiiil 

C. A. KiRKPATRICK licc-l'll siilllll 

Robert L. Hatcher lUuimss Manai/n- 

Frank A. Finlev Librarian 

Bruce Alexander Iccompanist 




Truesdale 



Barnes Hatcher LEnvvicH 



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Musical Club Features 



String Cluis 

C. A. KiKKPATRiCK Mandolin 

Paul Robbins Guitar 

J. N. Truf.sdale Mandolin 



Wade Mvers Ilanjo-Ukr 

J. P. Kramer Mandolin 

C. W. Lehrback . Banjo 



First Tenor 
Robert Bruton 

Second Tenor 
James N. Truesdale 

Bob Hatcher 



Quartette 

First Bass 
James B. McLarty 

Second Bass 
Hubert Hill and John Burwell 

Blackface Comedians 

Jim Rowe 



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Glee Club 



Eari.e Brian 
Robert Broton 
Paul Grady 



First Tenor 

Fred Hassenplug 
M. E. HoBBS 

A. J. HOLTOX 



Julian Neal 
John Guice 
Fred Capps 



John C. Dailev 
C. S. Hooper, Jr. 
Haxnis Latham 



Scc'jiiil Tenor 

DoxALi) Lumpkin 
Tom LrnxE 
James Rome 
G. E. Weathersbee 



Ralph Shumaker 
James Truesdale 
j. H. Mc-rov 



F. H. Brinklev 
D. Reid Craven 

F. A. FlNLEY 

Henry Hottenstein 



First Bass 

Frederick Krupp 
C. N. Moore 
James B. McLarit 
W. M. rpCHURCH 



Andrew Taylor 
Albert Stanbury 
Sanders Dallas 
Empie Wisiiart 



John Burwell 
Robert Cockrane 
Alfred Goodson 



Second Bass 

Hubert Hill 
Wade Mvers 
H. NL POE 



J. T. Ramsaur 
\'ernon- Sechriest 
L. L. Todd 



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Glee Club Itinerary 



Mount Olive 
Lurnberton 



Fall Tour 

Chadbourn 
Goldsboro 



Dunn 
Kins ton 



Midwinter Concert 
Duke University 

Spring Tour 

Troy Asheville 

Laurinburg Rutherfordton 

Charlotte Statesville 

Meredith College Greensboro College 



This year has doubtless been the greatest year in the Duke Glee Club's history. 
Not only has the club functioned here at the University in more programs than ever, 
but the trips have been more successful. The Glee Club has contributed much to the 
life of the University by singing at the monthly vesper services and by leading the 
chapel music every day, as well as furnishing several Friday Music-Day programs. 

More than a dozen concerts have been given outside of Durham. The Glee Club 
has sung in the leading towns of the state, some of the more important cities being 
Asheville, Charlotte, Greensboro and Raleigh, and wherever the Glee Club has ap- 
peared there has been much favorable comment. 

The Musical Comedy by both the Men's Glee Club and the Women's Glee Club 
has likewise been an added attraction on the year's calendar. 

But the crowning event of the year's activities was the winning of th? state cham- 
pionship among the colleges of the state, and the participation in the Southern Con- 
test at Greenville, S. C. In the latter event Duke also won a very high place. Two 
rather difficult numbers were sung by the club in this contest, the selection being The 
Broken Melody by Sebelius, and Worship of Cod in Nature by Beethoven. Dear Old 
Duke was used for the college song. 

With such a splendid year's work behind them, the Glee Club expects to do even 
greater things another year and to launch into larger territory. 



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Duke University Sympkony Orchestra 

G. E. I.EFTWICH, Jk., Coiuiuclor 
I lolins 



R. B. Fearing 
E. M. Arons 


C. 

J. 
G 


P 
P. 

E. 


Malick J. C. Dailev 
Kramer Hannis Latham 
Weathersbhk F. M. Hulme 




I.. L. Todd 
1). R. Craven 


E. H. Smith 
R. W. House 




A. 
M 


Clarinets 

J. HOLTON \V. A 
ILLER WrAV W. J. 


Pierce 
Eatmon 




S. C. Jones 
S. L. Kaufman 


L. V. Fischer 




L. 


L. 


Saxophones 
Adams J. W. 


Neal 




M. Gibson 


W. C. Lassiter 








Troinhones 
H. C. Zachary 




11 


R. Lumpkin 


Trumpets 
H. C. BosT 

A. S. NOBLITT 








E-b Horn 
J. L. Hassell 




11 


Flute 

F. IIOITENS'IEIN 


Cello 
S. B. Lehrback 








Bass Tuhas 
T. M. LiriLE 
M. A. Campbell 




J. 


String Bass 
N. Truesdale 


Baritone 
Robert Finley 








Piano 
Bruce Alexander 

Drums and Traps 
D. M. Garland 






Ty/iipani 
John I.upton 



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Duke University Blue Devils 

George E. Leftvvicii, Jr., Director 



Trombone — 




Piano — 


Henrv Bost 


Saxophones — 


D. M. McGlauchlin 


Trumpet — • 
Henry Zacharv 
William Lassiter 


Julian Neal 
D. M. Gibson 
L. V. Fischer 


Banjo — 
George Round 


Bass— 




Drums — 


Tom Little 




John Lupton 



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Duke University Band 

George E Lhkivvich, Jr., Din-clor 



Cornets 


Clarinets 


C Saxophones 


E-b Saxophones 


W. E. Austin 


W. A. Pierce 


W. N. FORTESCUE 


H. Bergman 


Emile Saixt Amaxd 


R. H. House 


Earl Evans 


E. H. Smith 


W. H. Parker 


R. O. Starnes 


P. L. Reams 


W. A. Pegram 


F. W. McCracken- 


J. P. Kramer 


S. B. Underwood 


H. M. Gibson 


W. C. Lassiter 


F. S. Best 


W. F. HuriENBACK 


I,. V. Fischer 


H. C. Zackarv 


T. S. Stearxs 


H. A. Tallev 


O. E. Ross 


D. A. WiTTICK 


L. V. Chapell 


Robert Williams 


C. E. Spear 


F. M. Pratt 


W. J. Eatmore 


John Kramer 


J. W. Neal 


D. R. LuMPKix 


S. C. Jones 

A. J. HOLTON 


Russell Ransom 


S. L. Kaufman 


B-b Saxophones 


Trombones 


E-b Horns 


Baritone Horns 


J. P. Adams 


H. C. BosT 


L. W. PURDV 


Wei.don Beacham 


T. H. Newton 


J. G. Pratt 


E. R. DOSHER 


Horace Wise 




A. S. Noblitt 


J. L. Hassell 






J. C. Burwell 


W. E. DUNSTAN 






\V. S. Penn 






Tenor Horn 


Piceolo 


Baritone Saxophone 


Bass Tuba 


H. L. Trotter 


H. F. Hottevstein 


Robert Fin lev 


M. A. Campbell 
T. M. Little 


- 


Snare 


Drums 




A. D. Bertine 


C. F. HONEVCUTT 


\V. I.. Bizzle 


F. A. Finlev 


J. S. Stanley 


D. M. Garland 


John Lupton 






Bass 


Drum 






C. H. 


Miller 
17> 





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Wo 



men s 



Glee Club 



Mrs. J. Foster Barnes, Director 

Edna Widenhouse President 

Annie Louise Caldwell Secretary-Treasurer 

Dot Schallert Business Manager 

Members 

Rachel Copeland Mildred Murrell Elizabeth Maithews 

Annie Biggerstaff Kellah Miller Cornelia Yarbrough 

Hazel Knight Eva Malone Hazel Johnson 

Frances Johnston Kathleen Smith Elizabeth Braswell 

Nell Spivey Marjorie Cannon Frances Evans 

Maybeth Steidley Marjorie Peoples Mary Gattis Holland 

Pauline Weber Carolyn Shooter Lena Brooks 

Sue Warlick Helen Eubanks Margaret Zachary 

Mary Brown Violette Faucette Marie Tyler 

Anita Umberger Elizabeth MacFadyen Irma Edmundson 

Evelyn Hancock Stephanie Moore Margaret Lee 

Florence Dailey Elizabeth Stalling Fannie Powell 

Nancy Browning Inez Malone Leila Self 

Jane Shull Virginia Mims Irma Johnson 

Christine Edwards Mary Branson Margaret Battle 

Iva Pitt May Pearl Jones Bessie Copeland 

Lilian Stewart 



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Tne Taurian Players 



IIn'DKr riiK nmi-nioN of Mrs. Paih. M. (Iross 



Ol'I-lCKRS 



Fred Roper I'lisulnil 

Edith Parker lia-I'ii sidi-nl 

Pauline Weber Si-<ri-lary 

Talmadge Peele Treasurer 

J. B. Coui.E ...... SliKje Maiiaijrr 



Moruek Kuck 
L. L. Hardin 

Alton Sadler 

o. c. c;iLEs 



Hustness Maiuifjer 

. . . I-Urelrician 

I'rolierly Man 

Irtist 



KenEtta Fulton Cnsluii 



A. H. ConoN Press .^lJent 

The Taurian /'layers is an amaleiir troupe of actors devoteil to the ailvaiiceiiunt of the drama 
and to the prodiietion of worth-while phiys in North Carolina. This organization is neither 
subsidized nor underwritten hy the t'niversity in any way and handles all of its business with- 
out any outside financial assistance. 

As the Chanticleer goes to press, the Taurian Players are in the midst of a most success- 
ful seasoiL The agKregate audience for the season, half-closed already, set a new h!gh mark. 
Performances of Taurian production are being given throughout the state, and the Taurian 
Players have received most favorable comment from dramatic critics in North Carolina as well 
as throughout the South. 

The Taurian Players have come to the fore in the field of Little Theatre work with their 
revival of Douglas Jerrold's "Black Ey'd Susan" on its hundredth anniversary, which was pre- 
sented in their own theatre. Quite an able business staff is at the disposal of the organization, 
and the approaching season promises even greater Taurian successes. 



Seventh Season, 1927-28 



Casts 



"The Bad Man" 

Duke Auiiilorium, November iq 

GILBERT JONE.S Fnd Rodct 

MORG.\X PELL (.'h.uU's MMler 

HENRY SMITH Williiim Waller 

LUCIA PELL Pauline Wi-bur 

RED GIDDINGS Morck-n Buck 

J.\SPER H.\RDY Luthir .Angle 

ANGELA HARDY E..sie Ncal Gibiion 

PANCHO LOPEZ Frank Mcnaker 

VENL'STI.\NO Hiimer Keever 

ALVERAD.\ luanita Rouse 

BRADLEY Vernon Chappell 

BLAKE J. B. Coble 



"Black E\'d Si sax" 

Taurian Players Lillle Theatre 
Jf'eek of Feliruary /s 

BL.\CK EY'D SUSAN .V.ll lOiluarcl.s 

WILLIAM Frank .Menaker 

HATCHET lulian Rayford 

G.V.\TBR.\1N Honur Keever 

.r.\<'OB TWIG Albert Cotton 

RAKER E. F. Martin 

.\r»MIRAL Jennings King 

LIEUTENANT PIKE John Paul Lucas 

DOLLY MAYFLOWER Iva Pitt 

PLOLTGHSHARE Don Glassle 

BLL-E PETER Charlie Miller 

SEAWEED Andre Rodriquez 

QUID Grogan Ueall 

CAPTAIN CROSSTREE Fred Roper 

CAPTAIN Luther Angle 

CAPTAIN John Acheson 



GIRL D..t I'ill.nv 

GIRL B.lzabetl, Caldwell 

GIRL Jane Shul! 

MUSICIAN Rubv Melnroe 

MUSICIAN Francis Hulrne 



"Captaix Applkjack" 

Duke .luditorium, .-] pril 12 

AMBROSE APPLEJACK Charles Miller 

IVAN BOROLSK Y Frank Menaker 

POPPY FAIRE Mavbeth Steidley 

ANNA V.XLESKA Charlotte Stelllng 

HORACE PENGARD Grogan Beall 

MRS. PENGARD luanita House 

PALMER L)ot Jennette 

LUSH William Walker 

MRS. WH.A.TCOMBE Nell Spivey 

DENNETT Waverly Anderson 



"AndroclI'.s and THi; Lion" 

Duke .1 udilarium. May 5 

ANDRC^CLES lobn Aiheson 

MEGAERA Allci- Roane Cro.ss 

LION John L. Rurke 

CENTL'RION Julian Rayford 

C.\PTAIN Morilen Buck 

L.WINI.A Pauline Weber 

LENTULUS Don Glassie 

METULLUS V>. K. Jack.son 

FERROVIUS Ilm Thompson 

SPINTHO Homer Keever 

EDITOR Luther Angle 

MENAGERIE KEEPER Talmadge Peele 



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OEDASTinC 



Intercollegiate Debating 



For the past several years Duke University has gained a most enviable place in the debating 
circles in the South and East. During that time an especially brilliant group of debaters has been 
in college, and. under the able coaching of H. J. Herring, has made Duke one of the outstanding 
debating schools in the South and East, if not the most outstanding. 

On November twenty-third Duke met the British Union of Students' debating team at Duke in an 
open forum debate on the negative of the question, "Resolved: That an uncompromising pacifism 
is the only effective attitude toward war." A vote was to he taken before and after the debate, 
and the team which changed the opinions of the greater number of the audience was to be declared 
the winner. By this method of voting the Duke team, composed of Jennings G. King. Ray Car- 
penter and T. Spruill Thornton, lost to the clover English team by a narrow majority. 

On February 17 Everett B. Weatherspoon, Paul R. Ervin and Richard C. Home, representing 
Duke, met the University of West Virginia here on the affirmative of the subject, "Resolved; That 
the increased power of the federal government, as shown during the last quarter of a century, in- 
dicates a wise tendency." The debate was conducted on the open forum plan, and no decision was 
given. 

As the "Chanticleer" goes to press, the debating season is really just beginning. On March 22 
Jennings G. King and Paul R. Ervin meet Rutgers College here in an old-style decision debate on 
the negative of the subject, "Resolved: That the United States should cease to protect by armed 
force capital invested in foreign lands except after formal declaration of war." On March 26 the 
University of Alabama meets Duke here on the same question. T. Spruill Thornton and C. Ray 
Carpenter represent Duke, taking the affirmative. This debate will also be a decision debate held 
on the old style plan. On March 30 W. A. Hart and Harold G. Cuthrell meet here Duke's traditional 
rival. Swarthmore College. The debate will be held here on the open forum style on the subject, 
"Resolved: That the United States needs a new party." 

From these six speaker.s will be selected the team of two men, which will begin its invasion of 
the Southern States on April 16. Debates have been scheduled with the University of Alabama and 
Birmingham Southern and are pending with Emory University and several other colleges and uni- 
versities. The debates thus far scheduled will be on the query, "Resolved: That the United States 
should cease to protect by armed force capital invested in foreign countries except after formal 
declaration of war," Duke debating on both sides of the question in different debates. It is con- 
fidently expected that Duke will win all of these contests, duplicating the feat of last year, when 
all the debates on the Southern trip were won. 



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Inter-Society Debating 

Thirty-Sixth Annual Debate 

Hesperian Team — C. H. Livengood, Jr., J. I. Morgan, Jr., R. M. Johnston 
Columbian Team — C. P. Bnwi.ES, T. O. Gentry, Paul F. Grady 

Query: Resolved, Th.it the United States should grant immediate independence ti> the Philippines. 

Hesperia won the decision. This year's victory marked the twentieth for Ilesperia, while 
Columbia has won si.xteen decisions. 



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Ministerial Association 



S. E. Mercer 

C. P. Bowles 
C. D. Brown 

C. D. Brown 



C. J. Andrews 
C. D. Barclift, Jr. 
Burr Baughman 
R. J. Barnwell 
C. P. Bowles 
C. D. Brown 
R. R. Branton 
F. G. Brummht 
S. E. Burgess 
J. H. Carper 
James Cleaver 
M. I. Cline 

R. H. CONNOCK 

R. M. Courtney 



Presidents 

C. P. Bowles 
J ice-Presiilen ts 

R. L. House 
Secretaries 

L. A. TiLLEV 

Treasurers 

A. S. NOBLITT 



Members 

M. E. Cunningham 
R. G. Dawson 
James Dunlap 
E. B. Edwards 
H. L. Frick 
Luther Haywood 
G. F. Hood 
R. L. House 
Norman Huffman 
t. m. honevcutt 
H. H. Johnson 
J. L. Joyce 
W. L, Lanier 
John Link 



L P. McKinley 
S. E. Mercer 

A. S. NoBLITT 

J. G. Pratt 
J. R. Regan 

H. G. RUARK 

C. M. Smith 
O. H. Stacy 
\. J. Strawbridge 
A. L. Thompson 
L. H. Thompson 

L. A. TiLLEY 

Millard Warren 
J. E. Yountz 



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' 1 £>2d • 



Cosmopolitan Club 



Members 

M. TSUDA 

E. Joseph 
Lillian Chandler 
Rav Carpenter 
S. W. Chang 
W. V. Chen 
Owen K. Ouch 

C. W. Clay 



Bessie Copeland 
John Burwell 

D. E. KiRKPATRICK 

C. N. Wang 

J. M. UWAZUMI 

DiAGO Rodriguez 
Marcia Russell 



Oh, East is East, and If est is If est, an/1 never the tivain shall meet. 
Till Earth and Sky stand presently at Hod's t/reat Judgment Seat; 
But there is neither East nor If est. Border, nor Breed, nor Birth. 

If hen tiuo strong men stand fare to faee. tho' they eonie from the (nils of the earth! 

Kipling 



177 



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Classical Club 

The Classical Club enjoys the distinction of being the oldest of the literary and scientific 
organizations on the campus. While its chief interest is in Classical studies, the social side is 
not neglected. The Club meets fortnightly, the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. 

Officers 

Prof. F. P. Johnson President 

Akthur Briogers Secretary 

Harold G. McCurdv Treasurer 



Bryan Aycock 
B. B. Carstarphen 

Julian U. Connallv 
Thomas F. Culbreth, Jr. 
Harvey Frick 
Prof. A. M. Gates 
Douglas Giles 
J. Chisman Hanes 



Me.mbers, 1927-28 

Norman Huffman 
John- L. Joyce 
Hannis T. Latham, Jr. 
Charles S. Livencood, Jr. 
Prof. C. W. Peppler 
LiSTON Pope 
J. G. Pratt 
Prof. R. R. Rosborough 



George W. Sanoers 
Warren C. Sledb 
C. Moody Smith 
H. L. Snuggs 
Albert Stanbury 
C. T. Thrift, Jr. 
James N. Truesdale 
Herman Walker, Jr. 



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The Forum 

Girls' Latin (jliih 

Officers 

Louise Parker l'r,sij,nl 

Lucy Burt ri,e-l>risidcnt 

Anita Scarboro Secrelnry-Trcasuri-r 

Verona Blalock .... Clutinnau I'roijram Commiltee 

Members 

Elizabeth BARXEriE Violet Judd 

Verona Blalock Vertie Moore 

Lucy Burt Kathryn Morgan 

Doris Christe Louise Parker 

Virginia Colvard Margaret Royall 

Dorothy Gregory Malissa Strother 

Virginia Hobgood Anita Scarboro 

Helen Jenkins Lucy Wesley 
Neila Weston 

179 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

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Hesperian Literary Society 



H. L. IIf-sikk 



R. G. Ti iTi.E 



J. G. King 



AXDERSO.V, 1.. W. 

Andrews, II. L. 
AsHLEv, Howard 
AvcocK, C. B. 
Beall, Grocam 
Berlin, H. I. 
Biggs, C. G. 
Bloom, Jerome 
Booth, W. R. 
Brown, C. D. 
Bunting, E. H. 
Burch, J. C. H. 
Burch, R. A. 
Burwell, J. C. 
Cahill, Marshall 
Candler, Coke 
Carstarphen, B. H. 
Chappell, L. V. 
Coffin, H. A. 
Cole, L. W. 
Connach, R. H., Jr. 
connallv, j. v. 

CORPENING, ReeCE 

Cotton, A. H. 
Courtney, Marvin 
Culbreth, T. F. 
culbreth, w. b. 
Cunningham, I. II. 
Curtis, Robert 
cuthrell, h. c;. 
Deiso, A. H. 



Okficer.s, 1927-28 
Prcsiilciits 

R. G. TUITLE 

A. B. Enos 

J'ict-Prt'sirlcn/s 

J. C. Burwell 
J. C. Burwell 

E. S. Raper 
R. M. Johnston 

Mkmkkrs 



J. C. lUlKWKLL 



M. R. CORPEMNG 



T. F. CULBREIil 



F.DMUNDSON, R. B. 

Edwards, A. C. 
Ellison, R. H. 
Enos, A. B. 
Evans, J. F. 
Evans, \V. E. 
Falls, C. B., Jr. 
Fulp, George, Jr. 
Garland, W. C. 
Gav, C. H. 
CJiBBS, A. H. 
Godfrey, O. C. 
Goldwin, R. 
Hales, J. D. 
Hamilton, C. E., Jr. 
Hamlin, W. T. 
Hanes, J. C. 
Harrison, R. S. 
Hayes, Harold 
Helms, R. M. 
Henderson, M. K. 
Hester, H. L. 
IlEwriT, T. F. 

HOLTON, A. J. 

HoopY, G. C. 

HORNE, R. C. 

hoitenstein. h. f. 
howi.and, w. f. 
Ireland, W. N. 
I VIE, G. H. 
Jackson, D. K., Jr. 
Johnston, R. M. 



Johnston, W. E., Jr. 
Jones, A. M. 
jovner, vv. e. 
Kanipe, H. L. 
King, Jennings G. 
Lamm, J. D. 
Lamm, R. W. 
Lanier, W. L. 
Le.viis, Knox 
Livengood, Charles H. 
Lumpkin, O. R. 
Martin, S. A. 
McCr.acken, R. F. 
MacDonald, G. L. 
McDowell, G. W. 
McKiNNEY, Troy 
Menaker, F. H. 
Mercer, S. E. 
Morgan, E. C. 
Morgan, J. I., Jk. 
Murphy, Charles 
Newsom, O. F. 
Newso.vi. n. W. 
Nicks, S. F. 
Noblitt, a. S. 
Pitts, R. S. 
Pms, \V. R. 
Pratt, J. G. 
PURDY, L. W. 
Ramsaur, J. T. 
Rankin, C. C. 
Rankin, Elmer 



Raper, R. S. 
Reynolds, G., Jr. 
RoBBiNs, Paul 
Rogers, C. T., Ir. 
Roper, R. F. 
Rosen, C. R. 
Rlbensiein, N. 
Sample, Jack 
Shaw, T. J., Jr. 
Smith, A. (i. 
Smith, R. C. 
Snyder, C. W., Jr. 
Sparger, S. G. 
Stalvey, J. Ben 
Starnes, \V. 
Stephenson, M. O. 
Sullivan, C. R. 
Thornion, Spruii.l 
Tuj-JLE, R. G., Jr. 
Tyndall, a. F. 
Walker, W. A. 
Wariner, W. H. 
Warren, M. W. 
Weatherspoon, F. B. 
Weingarten, II. C. 
Wesi brook, II. I... Jr 
Williams, W. 

WlNGAlE, W. J. 

Woodward, J. L. 
Varbrough, E. S. 



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Columbian Literary Society 



K R. Ervin 



OlTIClRS, 1927-28 

Pnsi(l( Ills 

\V. A, llAKl 



J. A. URniiiiRs 

C. C. I.Ul'TON 



/ icc-Frrsi/lciits 
B. H. Zk;lar Murray W'alti-rs 

Scncttiiiis 

J. A. BRmilERS II. C. FKRRtl.L H. P. SiRICKl.AM) 

J'l I Hi II re IS 
W. C. Parsons M. W. Maxess 



Abern'ethv, T. E. 
Beasi.ev, W. M. 
BivENS, H. L. 
Bkinklev, \V. S. 
Kroi'hers, J. A. 
Bauchman', Burr 
Brl'MMItt, Ered 
Biggs, W. C. 
Bennett, Landis 
Bowles, Charles P. 
Brent, Fred 
Cook, O'Neal 
Cranfori), Robert 
CuLP, H. R. 
Carper, J. H. 
Carpenter, Ray 
Carpenier, Wesley 
Cobb, E. D. 
Carver, Malone 
CARRixnroN, S. R. 
Clay, C. W. 
Dunn, W. L., Jr. 
Ervin, P. R. 
EowARDs, Roger 
Ellen, Charles 

EllRINCHAUS, E. E. 

Ervin, Lamont 
Faulkner, John 
Ferrell, II. C. 
FoNviLLE, Ralph 
Frick, H. L. 
Fraxko, Alfred 
Futrell, J. W. 
C7ENTRY, Thomas 
Griffin, A. T. 



Members 




Grady, Paul 


Partridge, E. R. 


Hammond, A. F. 


Priest, T. A. 


Harris, A. P. 


Pope, L. C. 


Harris, I. E. 


Painter, W. W. 


Howell, Hugh 


Parsons, W. C. 


HORNE, C. B. 


Pratt, F. M. 


House, R. L. 


Pearson, R. R. 


Hauss, \V. C. 


Reynolds, Rufus 


HONEYCUIT, TrO^ M. 


Rousseau, W. H., 


Harriss, C. L. 


Ruckers, Max 


Hatley, R. C. 


Rhyne, Gray 


Huff.mav, Norman 


Sullivan, J. J. 


Hart, W. A. 


Shaw, W. H. 


Heizer, J. S. 


Stallings, W. II. 


Holt, Jack 


Stoner, p. G. 


Hood, (Jeorge F. 


Smith, Charles M 


Jones, W. L. 


Stacy, O. Hicks 


Jenkins, [arrett 


St. Amand, Emilk 


Jenkins, R. H. 


Swan, C. N. 


KiKER, Wade, Jr. 


Simons, W. A., Jr. 


Kendall II. L. 


Simpson, Harold 


Kresky, Ronald 


Smith, R. B., Jr. 


Lemmond, IIarr\ 


Sneed, S. M. 


Latha.m, Harris 


Strickland, H. P. 


LUPTON, C. C. 


Stewart, Burton 


LupTON, H. A. 


Thrift, Charles 


Miller, C. H. 


Tsuda, M. 


Moore, ]. G. 


Thomas, J. W. 


McCuRDY, Harold 


TlIORNBURC, J. W. 


McIntyre, W. C. 


White. E. K. 


Maness, M. W. 


Walters, M. W. 


Mitchell. C. L. 


Williams, Roberi' 


Murphy, Anderson A. 


Wilson, I.i.oyd 


MacDonai D R I.. 


I'nderwood, S. B. 


MacKay. J. W. 


Ziglar, B. II. 


Pierce, O. A. 





Jr. 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

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51515151515151 



Fraternities 



National Honorary 
Phi Beta Kappa Omicron Delta Kappa 

Sigma Upsilon Tan Kappa Alpha 

Kappa Delta Pi Theta Alpha Phi 

Chi Delta Phi Lambda Phi Gamma 

Local Honorary 
Red Friars Delta Upsilon Beta 

White Duchy Delta Phi Rho Alpha 

9019 Tombs 

Eko-L Beta Omega Sigma 

Professional 
Sigma Nu Phi Nii Sigma 

Iota Gamma Pi 



Alpha Tail Omega 
Kappa Sigma 
Phi Delta Theta 
Kappa Alpha 
Pi Kappa Alpha 



Academic 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Sigma Chi 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Delta Sigma Phi 
Chi Tau 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



Delta Delta 
Pi Epsilon Pi 
Sigma Tau Alpha 
Psi Delta Sigma 
Rente 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Kappa Delta 



Sororities 



Zeta Tau Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Theta 



186 



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PKi Beta Kappa 

Beta of North Carolina 

Organized March 29, 1920 



OlFICHRS 

William H. (Slasson- Fr,sultnl 

Mrs. N. I. White riri'-l'nsulinl 

Albfrt M. Webb Srin-lary 

W. T. Lai'rade . . Memhi-r oj llu- Kxiiulivi- C.ommitlcf 
N. 1. While . . . Memln-r oj llic Exciuth'f Commillie 



F. S. Aldrii)(7E 

Alice M. Baldwin (Cornell) 

P. F. Baum (Hamilton) 

W. BovD (Wm. and Mary) 

J. P. Breedlove 

F. C. Brown 

James Cannon, III 

F. COWPER (Trinity, Conn.) 

W. I. Cranford 

W. C. Davison (Princeton) 

C. W. Edwards 

W. P. Few- 



Members IN THE F.ACUI.TY 

R. L. Flowers 

A. M. CiALES (Wcsleyan) 

.'\. H. Gilbert (Cornell) 

W. H. Glasson (Cornell) 

W. H. Hall 

C. C. Hatley 

H. Holton 

F. P. Johnson (Missouri) 

J. T. LANNINf; 

W. Laprade (Johns Hopkins) 

W. S. LOCKHART 

C. B. Markha.vi 

H. K. Miller (Princeton) 



(J. C. MUMFORD 

L. Q. Mlmford 

W. H. FE<iRAM 

C. Peppier (Johns Hopkins) 

Helen H. Scoit (Wellesley) 

J. H. Shields (Texas) 

E. D. SoPER (Dickinson) 

H. E. Spence 

W. H. Wannamaker 

A. M. Webb (Vale) 

N. I. White 

R. N. Wilson (Havcrford) 



A. B. BiscoE (Dickinson) 
Blanche McK. Broadway 
Blanche Henry Clark 
R. G. Dawson 
R. T. Hardaway 



Gr.adu.ate Stl uext Members 

S. M. Holton 
R. L. Jerome 
J. M. Keech 
D. E. Kirkpatrick 



W. A. Mabrv 

Clara E. Morris 

E. P. McFee 

L. B. Orfield (Minnesota) 

Bessie A. Rooker 



Elections in the Ye.ar 1927-28 

Honorary Mi'mhiTS .llumni Mimlur 

Colonel John F. Bruton W. B. Bolich, 1917 

Dr. William McDoucall 



Helen Deane Chandler 
Lillian Alice Chandler 
Margaret Elizabeth Craven 
Alfred Franklin Hammond 
Hanselle Lindsay Hester 
Ellen Harris Huckabee 



Junior Elections 

Charles A. Kirkpatrick 
Rebecca Kirkpatrick 
Kenneth R. Lacersteiii 
Catherine Mills 
John W. Morgan 



William R. Morgan, Jr. 
I.OLisE Pierce Parker 
William Stewart Rogers 
Bessie \'irginia Thompson 
James N. Truesdale 
Gladys Ruth White 



Senior Elections 

Frank Malcolm Bigcerstaff Leila Hubbard 
Mabel Jennei-ie (Jriffin 
Ernest Lee Haywood 
Alford Jesse Holton 

187 



Gladstone W. McDowell 
Clara Oiavia Petty 
Anita Scarboro 



IraJHJHfHJHJHJHl Il!^HANTn:LEER I515T5151S15151 




Sigma Upsilon 

National Literary Fraternity 

Founded at the University of the South in 1906 
Colors: Green and Gold Active Chapters: Thirty-three 

Fortnightly Club Chapter of Sigma Upsilon 

Established 1913 

Fratres in Facultate 

A. H. Gilbert W. T. Laprade 

W. H. Glasson F. K. Mitchell 

H. J. Herring H. E. Spence 

J. B. HUBEELL W. H. Wannamaker 

Fratres in Universitate 

Graduate School 

A. B. Gibson C. C. Herbert 

J. H. Hall D. E. Kirkpatrick 

Laiv School 

L. S. Blades, Jr. 

Class of ig^S 
H. L. Hester J. N. Truesdale 



P. F. Baum 
James Cannon, HI 
F. C. Brown 
F. A. G. CowPER 



Gav Allen 



B. B. Carstarphen 

A. H. Cotton 

J. M. Albercotti 



A. M. Webb 
N. I. White 
E. H. Young 



J. A. McCain 



J. I. Taylor 



C. A. Kirkpatrick T. J. Shaw, Jr. 

Class of lQ2g 
R. H. Ellison B. H. Jones J. P. Lucas, Jr. 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

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51515151515151 




Kappa Delta Pi 



Iliinnrciiy Edutaluinal Frulniiily 

Fouiiclfil at the rniversity of IHiimis in k^ii 
Colors: Pale Blue and CrimMiii .lili-vr Cl/ii/iliis: Fiirtv-fiuir 

Alpha Tat Ciiaptkr 

Established 1927 

Fr.atres IX Facultate 

Or. Alice M. B ai.dhis Proi . llni.i.AM) Hoi.ton Or. Iohx Carr Prof. A. C. Joriiax 

Prof. B. G. Cmi.ns Prof. A. M. Proctor Prof. O. B. Douglas Prof. W. W. Rankin- 

Fratres Honoris Caisa 

Pr. \Vii.lia«' Pi""'Tov Few Dr. Robert L. Flowers 

Dr. William Hane Wannamaker 



Mabel BENNErr 
Fannie Brogden 
B. B. Carstarphen 
Mary Glasson 
E. L. HAvvvoon 
Alfred Hoi.tox 
Ellen- Huckabee 
Favlene Jones 
Mamie Mansfielh 
R. VV. McDonald 



Elizabeth Grey 



1"RATRES in 

.'Vntoineite Mingus 
I o'uTsk Parker 
F. M. 1;icgerstaff 
Lucy Burt 
I.ETHiA Cross 
Mabel Oiffin' 
Marshall Helms 
Leila Hubbard 
Eunice Jones 

D. R. LUMPKIK 

Fratre 
Eldridge Himes 



Universitate 

M. R. Matiieson 
Catherine Mills 
Sallie Newman 
Clara Petty 
Lillian Rogers 
Mrs. Ro.xie J. Sasser 
Virginia Stevens 
Mrs. G. W. Tandy 
Bessie Thompson 
RuBiE Vause 

.s IN Urbe 

Irene Gupton 



Lucy Wesley 
CJladys White 
Bessie Rooker 
Eunice Stamey 
Melissa Stroimer 
Ethel Taylor 
Marie Tyler 
Sei.ma Warlick 
Neila Weston 
Rebecca Kirkpairick 



LiLLABEL MaSSEY 



irHraiararaiajHj iiii^HiNTjcLEER 



51515T51Sl515f| 




Colors: Blue and Gold 



Helen Chandler 
Ken Etta Fulton 



Chi Delta Phi 

Zeta Chapter 

SORORES IN UnIVERSITATE 

Gi'tii/iiate School 

Blanche Henry Clark Margaret Ledbetter 

Jessie Hauser Louise Seabolt 

Carolyn Shooter 

Class of ig28 

Lelia Hubbard 
Rebecca Kirkpatrick 
Opal Winstead 

Class of ig2g 
Mary Arden Hauss 

Class of igjo 
Helen Jenkins Esther Morris 



Flowrr: Pansy 



Lilian Stewart 
Selma Warlick 



Miss Alice M. Baldwin 
Mrs. Henrv Belk 
Mrs. F. a. G. Cowper 
Mrs. a. H. Gilbert 



Honorary Me/nbers 

Mrs. Paul Gross 

Miss Fronde E. Kennedy 

Mrs. H. E. Spence 

190 



Mrs. Zebulon Vance 
Mrs. a. M. Webb 
Miss Mary Wescott 
Mrs. N. 1. White 



IfHJHJHrajHjgji 



THE CHANTICLEER 

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515T5I5I51515f| 




D. M. Arnold 
Dr. F. C. Brown 
B. F. Cini.DS 



J. M. AiKi.vs 
A. B. BiscoE 



C. G. Bennett 
H. L. BivENs 
R. B. Bruton- 

J. C. BURWELL 



Omicron Delta Kappa 

Rho Circle 

Fratrhs ix Facl'ltate 

E. M. Cameron' 
James DeHakt 

FrATRKS IX UXUHRSIIATK 
Graduate School 
R. R. Braxton 

O. E. KlRKPATRICK 

\V. A. Mabrv 

Laiv School 
J. E. Thompson 

Class of IQ38 

C. R. Carpenter 
T. S. Eanes 

H. L. Hester 

D. L. Kelly 

191 



Dr. W. H. Pegram 
Dr. E. D. Soper 
W. E. Tilson 



E. P. McFee 
A. C. Waggoner 



C. A. KlRKPATRICK 
J. N. 'iRLESnALE 
R. G. TUTTLE 

C. C. Weaver 



Iraiajarararajz 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• ' 1 Q2d • 



SmSTSlSlSlSTJ 




James Cannon, III 



Tau Kappa Alpka 

Colors: Light Blue and Purple 

Duke Chapter 

Fratres in Facultate 

B. G. Childs a. M. Proctor 

H. J. Herring 

Fratres in Universitate 

Graduate School 

W. A. Mabry 

Law School 

LlNWOOD B. HOLLOWELL S. GlLMER SPARGER 

Class of 1928 
Ray Carpenter Charles Hamilton Richard C. Horne 

Paul R. Ervin Hanselle Hester Robert Tuttle 

Annie Harbison Rachel Williams 

Class of 1929 
Jennings King T. Spruill Thornton 



192 



IfHfEfSra/iramI IjJ^hanth:leer 



5I5I5151515T5ll 




•-ij 



Sigma Nu Pki 



Colors: Purple and Cinld 



Floii-n : \\'hite Carnaticin' 



Richmond Pearson Chapter 

Frater in Urbe 
C. E. Jordan 

Fr.atres in Universitate 

Senior Law 

W. H. Branson L. B. Hoi.i.owell J. E. Thompson- 

F. \V. Davis S. G. Sparger j. c. Wmisnam- 

Junior Law 

W. A. Finch l. R. Morris 

S. M. HoLTON J. C. Troy 

M. C. Wilson 



193 



IfHjajaramraia 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 QSS • 



515151515151511 




Theta Alpha Phi 

National Dramatic Fraternity 

■ Founded at the University of Chicago in 1920 
Colors: Purple and White 

Membership, 2,600 

North Carolina Alpha 

Established 1925 

Members in the Faculty 

Dr. Paul M. Gross 

Members ix the University 

Graduate School 

L. H. HOLI.OWELL 

Class of IQ28 



. I dive Cliapters: 56 



Dr. p. F. Baum 



D. L. Fours 



Mrs. Paul M. Gross 



E. P. McFee 



H. I. Berlin 
A. H. Cotton 



Ken Etta Fulton 
Mary Glasson 
L. L. Hardin 



S. A. Martin 
Edith Parker 



Class of ig2g 

Morden Buck Talmadce Peele 

J. B. Coble Fred Roper 

Pauline Weber 

Class of 1930 
Luther Angle D. C. Giles 

194 



IrHfEJaraJHfam the^hantk:leer 



51515T51S1JT5t1 




ViOLETTE FauCETTE 

Ken- Etta Fulton 



Nu Sigma 

ll'ovun's lliiilnijiral Soroiily 

Colors: CJreeii and Gold 

SORORES IN UniVERSITATE 

Graduate School 

VORIS Matiienv 

Class of IQ2S 
Elizabeth tJiBBOvs 
Rl'th McNeil 



Dorothy Schallert 
Alma Vaughn 



Class of l(J3Q 
Elizabeth Carter Marv Smipp 

Honorary ISIcnibers 
Sophia Dahler Mrs. Mattie Southgate Jones 



IrafHjarajHJgja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

■ 1 9 2S • 



51515151515151 



^-^^- T^Vn-^T^^g^;^ 







FRIAR S 



Secret Order of the Senior Class 



196 



irHJHraiuHjajHj ihe^hant^cleer lasisTsmsTsD 




Wo.Mnx's HoxoRARv Senior Order 



197 



IrHfHjafEuajaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 Q2d • 



515151515151EI 




198 



Irarajsrararaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 
• 1 o iza . 



51515151515151 



9019 

ll(inii)(i>y S(/irjltirs/ti/i Siidily 

Founded ;it Trinity C(ilie;;e in 1890 
Colors: Scarlet and White 



F. S. Aldridce 
W. K. Bovi) 
J. P. Breeolovk 
James Cannon, 111 
W. I. Craxforr 
Bert Cunmncham 



Faculty Memukrs 

C. W. Edwards 
\V. II. Hall 
C. C. Hatle^' 
Herbert Herring 
Holland Holtox 
C. B. Markham 



J. M. Ormaxd 
A. M. Proctor 
H. E. Spence 
R. E. Til [OPEN 
W. H. Waxxamaker 
N. I. White 



C. P. Bowles 

A. F. Hammoxd, Jr. 

L. L. Hardin 

A. P. Harris 

E. L. Haywood 



Members ix the L'xiversit\' 
Class of IQ38 

H. L. Hester J. W. Morgan 

Thomas Hewitt W. R. Morgan 

A. J. Holtox H. A. Nichols 

C. A. KlRKPATRICK J. N. TrUESDALE 

K. R. Lacersteot R. G. Tittle 

G. W. McDowell 



Class of ig2g 

M. J. Bird J. G. King 

D. \V. BovEiT T. L. Peele 

J. M. A. de Bruvne Harry Presson 

J. E. Do.\Ev W. S. Sloan 

R. H. Ellison T. E. Summerow 

A. M. Frank J. L. Woodward 

D. K. Jackson E. S. Yarbrough 



199 



irBJHJHfBJHraja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

« 1 9 2d ' 



5l5I5T51Sl5T5n 




Eko-L 

(Women's Honorary Scholastic Fraternity) 
Founded at Trinity College, 1914 

Officers 

Bessie Thompson President 

Louise Parker Secretary-Treasurer 

Members 

Helen Chandler Catherine Mills 

Lillian Chandler Edith Parker 

Elizabeth Craven Louise Parker 

Emma Davis Katherine Phillips 

Leila Hubbard Anita Scarbro 

Ellen Huckabee Bessie Thompson 

Rebecca Kirkpatrick Gladys White 



IrETBJHTBJaJHJH 



THE CHANTICLEER 
• 1 o 12 a 



E1515151515151] 




Lambda Phi Gamma 

(Honorary Musical Fraternity) 

Alpha Chapter 



Colors: Red ami White 



Fratres in Facultate 

W. p. TVVADELL K. B. PATICRiO.V 

Fratres in L'niversitate 
Graduate Schnnl 

J. B. Mcl-ARTV 

Class of IQ2S 
Ralph Shlmaker Robert Cranford 

RORKRT Hatcher D. R. Lumpkin 

Charles Miller C. A. Kikkpatrick 

Class (jf 1(J2Q 
Eddie Smith Wade Myers 

William Pierce Hexrv Bost 



James Truesdale 
Robert Brutox 
a. j. holton 



Flower; Tiili 



I> 



Ray House 

F. A. FiNLEV 
J. C Bl'RWELL 

Max Wii.sox 
J. T. Ramsaur 



W. C. Lassiter 
Bruce Alexander 



Class of itjju 
Marshall Campbell 
E. M. Arons 



Robert Fearixg 
Paul Robbixs 



AIlsical Directors 
J. Foster Barxes G. E. Leftwich, Jr. 



IfHfEjarajajara 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 9 2d ' 



51515151515151 




'M 



iraraiarajHrajHl the^hanth:leer ismsismjisTi 



Colors: Red, Black and Purple 



H. L. Blomquist 
P. M. Gross 



Iota Gamma Pi 

Fouiuleil in 1923 
Local Siiriilifii Fralirnily 

Fratres IX Facli.tatk 

C. C. Hatley 
W. H. Pecram 
W. J. Seelev 

Fratres in Universitate 
Gradiuitc School 



Flower : Green Rose 



N. F. Wilkerson 
R. N. Wii.sON 



O. B. AUER 

IvEY Allen 
W. A. Ellison 



D. E. KiRKPATRICK 

E. P. McFee 
R. N. Thomas 



S. N. Wrenn 



Class of IQ28 
T. VV. Atoood G. B. Judd 



O. T. COLCLOUCH 

W. C. Earnhardt 
A. F. Hammond 
L. L. Hardin 



G. \V. McDowall 
J. \V. Morgan 
W. R. Morgan 
L. W. Purdv 



M. E. ROVSTER 



Class of ig2g 



O. C. Bruton 
W. E. Cranford 
A. T. Griffin 



R. S. Harrison 
T. A. Hathcock 
W. A. Pierce 



203 



irBfSfaiiJHfajz 



THE CHANTICLEER 

" • 1 Q2S ' 



515151515151511 




Delta Upsilon Beta 

(Honorary Band Fraternity) 
Diriclor of Band: G. E. Leftwich, Jr. 



Color: Blue 



J. C. liuRVVELL 

L. V. Chappell 
R. J. Cranford 
C. H. Miller 



W. E. Austin 
T. H. Newton 
M. C. Wilson 



F. S. Best 

M. A. Campbell 

W. N. FORTESCUE 

G. E. La K DON 
W. C. Lassitfr 



Class of igjS 

R. H. Wilkinson 

A. J. HOLTON 

R. W. House 
D. R. Lumpkin 
■■. M. McCracken 



(Uass of iQJg 
H. C. BosT 

E. H. Smith 

W. A. Pierce, Jr. 

Class of igjo 

F. M. Lyon 

D. C. McDuFFIE 

G. M. Wray 
D. M. Garland 
J. L. Hassell, Jr. 
C. B. Jones 



L. W. Purdy 
a. s. noblitt 
O. C. Bruton 



S. L. Kaufman 
J. P. Kramer 
T. M. Little 
W. A. Pegram 
J. S. Stanley, Jr. 



204 



irsfHjafHiHraja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

1 OLJd . 



51515151515T51] 




9l.'r¥...-Vf"..Ji^%t':n c 




Acl) P A 



®0@^9d 




2 



Delta Ph 


iRho 


Alpha 


El.TZABETH BarXETT 




Helen Jenkins 


Annie Lou Caldwell 




DOTT Jennette 


Florence Dailev 




Hazel Johns 


Edna Elias 




Rebecca Kirkpatrick 


Kenetta Fulton 




Edith Parker 


Martha Gibson 




Celene Phipps 


Hal Grimes 




Anita Scarborouoh 


Lucille Haves 




Leila Self 


Alma 


\'au(;hn 




Emily 


Vosselef 




AL^LA 


WVCHE 





205 



IrarajHinmiaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

> 1 Q2S 



51515151515151 




irEJHjarafEfajH 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 £>I2S . 



5l515T515T515l1 



TomDS 

Koinult'd iyo3 

Loral Iloniiniiy Junior iitij Srnior OrJrr 
Colors: Klack ami White Hov.rr: White Carnation 



Ia.viks Cannon', 111 
W. H. Hai.l 



Faculty Members 

II. E. Spknce 
R. l'.. TincPEN 



W. r. I'owK 
N. I. Wiirn- 



I. E. Alle.v 
W. C>. Bradshaw 
M. A. Bricgs 
W. S. Borland 
G. M. Carver 
A. G. Elliot 



MnMliLRS IX THE CiTV 

B. I. Faucette 
Claude Flowers 
Fred Flowers 

C. R. FnusMEE 
A. R. Hargrove 
H. c;. Hedrick 



1.. M. IlKILIN- 

R. r. IlicirnnvER 

R. 1". HOWERION 

G. T. McArtfiur 
M. E. Newsom 
H. C. Saiterfield 



J. M. Atkins 
E. J. Burns 



Memhers in the University' 

(irti/liia/r Srliool 
H. R. CuLP 

D. E. KlRKPATRICK 



E. P. McFee 
A. C. Waggoner 



Lmv School 



]. E. Thompson! 



J. C. WlIISNANT 



C. G. Bennett 

Harrv Bivens 
Robert Bruton 
Rav Carpenter 
T. S. Faxes 



Seniors 
W. H. Ervin- 

R. C. FiNLEV 

Martin (Jarrev 
DoiiGLAS Kellv 

C. A. KlRKPATRICK 
C. H. I.IIAKER 



Stewart Rogers 
Cecil Smatiiers 
James N. Truesdale 
Robert TuriLE 
C. C. Weaver 



William Adams 
J. W. Applewhite 
Fred Brummitt 



Juniors 

Coke Candler 
J. F. DoxEv 
Harrv Hollincswokiii 
Rov Hunter 



Amos Johnson 
C. E. Weatherbv 
1. I.. Woodward 



207 



IfHfajHjafHraja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

■ • 1 Q2S . 




Beta Omega Sigma 

(Sopliomore Order) 

Founded at Trinity College, Durhann, N. C, 1917 

Colors: Red and Black 







Fratres in Urbe 




W. S. BORL 


AND 


W. G. Bradshaw 


Henry Seeman 




Fratres in Universitate 






Inactive Memhcrs 




L. H. Bishop 

M. P. BOLICK 
J. C. BURWELL 


H. A. Coffin 
F. A. Finley 


W. G. Frazier 
R. 1.. Hatcher 

Juniors 


T. S. Eanes W. S. Rogers 
C. H. Litaker F. L. Walker 
C. C. Weaver 


WiLLL\M Adams 
Tom Allen 
Ralph Barker 
Henry Bost 


John L. Burke James Crute I1arr\ Hoi.lincsworth 
Hob Cassidy Wood Dorseit L. II. Kilco 
LiNwooD Christian George Hatcher William Wannamaker 

Hugh Westbrook 
J I live Members 


Fred Anders 

MiLFORD Baum 
Theron Bone 
Raney Bryant 
Donald Burch 


Paul Carson 
Dayton Dean 
Fred Evans 
RoLEY Farley 
Bobby Fearing 


Sammy Goode 
Ham Hannah 

LiNDSEY HOLCOMR 

W. H. Jennings 
Henry Kistler 


John Leach James Rowe 
J. T. McIntvre Joe Savage 
Mei.vin Peeler Evereit Teague 
W. C. PicKEiT Robert Thorne 
S. M. Rawlings Ernest Jenkins 



208 



fHjgjHIEfEfHJa the^hantu:leer [smsisijisisil 





rii 



k^ iP 



Fraternity Pan-Hellenic Council 

R. C. FiNLKv, Pi Kappa Alpha Pnsidrnl 

C. E. Smathers, Delta Sigma Phi Sccnlary-Triasurcr 

Members 

W. K. Kramhr ///■//<( Tail Onuija 

R. B. Bruton- Kapha Sii/ma 

T. A. Davis Kapha Ilp/ia 

R. C. FiNi.EV /'/ Kahha .llplia 

IIuGJi J. UnuKi.i Siijma I'hi hpiilon 

Davtdn Dkan Si^ma Clii 

A. W. Pecram Pi Kappa Phi 

C. E. Smathers Dilla Siijma Phi 

M. C. Wilson ('/;;■ Tau 

R. C. HoRNE Lambda Chi Alpha 

H. L. Hester /'/// Drlla Thria 



209 



pHrafEfHJHfBJa IM^^liNrnzLEER 



51515151515151 




Irzfsjaramraja 



THE CHANTICLEER 



1 012S 



51515151S15T5T] 



Alpha Tau Omega 



FoutkIi'cI i8<i5 
Colon: Old tIciUi and Sk> Hint- Ftnijjer: Tea Rose 

.lilk;- C/ui/'Icrs: Ninrt.v. .Ilumiii C/ui/'Ins: Kitty 

Membership, 22.500 

North Carolina Xi Ciiai'tkr 

Established 1872 

Frater in F.ACLLTATK 
R. L. Flowers 



S. J. Ancier 
F. S. Bennett 
Rev. M. Bradshavv 
R. \V. Hradshaw 
\V. G. Bradshaw 
J. B. Carr 
Ci. M. Carver 
Claude Flowers 



C. E. Hamilton, Jr. 
\V. K. Kramer . 



Fr.atres in Urbe 




W. W. Flowers 


J. R. RUGCLES 


C. E. Flowers 


n. R. SAI-rERFlELD 


Fred Flowers 


H. C. Satierfieli) 


E. J. Green 


Dr. J. A. Spekj) 


L. \V. Norton 


T. A. Stokes 


Sterling Nicmolsov 


F. E. Tucker 


J. S. Patterson 


Howard \\'eaver 


R. P. Reade 


T. C. \\'orth 


W. R. Reade 




Fratres in Universit.ate 




Class of IQ2S 




. . . Monroe W. B. Newbold 





Elizabeth Citv \V. S. Rogers . 


A 



Raleiph 
Asheville 



Class of iij2g 

John CJregorv Durham Joseph G. Separk . . 

P. P. Wynne Wynnburg, Tciin. 



Gastoiiia 



Arthur Bridgers 
Carter Farriss . 
Roberl Fearing . 
James Hackney . 



John Kramer . 
Stuart Robeson 
George Rogers . 



( J lass of i(jJO 

. . . Ralciuh Joseph Kramer ..... Elizabeth City 

. . High Point Blackard McCaslin . . LaGrange, Tenn. 

Elizabeth City Robert Thorne Littleton 

. . Lexington SA.vtUEi. Thorne Littleton 



Class of IQJI 

PLEDGES 

Elizabeth City Wharton Separk 

. . . Raleigh Albert Stanburv 

. . Asheville Roberi Willl\.\is . 



. Raleigh 

. Raleigh 

Elizabeth City 



IraiHfarajaram " 



THE CHANTICLEER 

' 1 9 2S > 



msisiEiEisisi 




irHfEjafHJHjajz 



THE CHANTICLEER 
' 1 o 12 a . 



51515151515151 



Kappa Sigma 



Fciumlfcl 1867 



Colors: Scarlet, White and F.meralil Cireen 
Active Cliapli-rs: 10+ 

Al fill I) lis /lip: 23,000 



Flo'U.ir: I.il> of-ihr X'alley 
huuli'i'i- C.liiipiirs: n; 
lliiiniii Cluiplirs: 75 



Eta Prix IK Chapter 

Estalilislunl 1S75 



R. L. Gregorv 
J. M. Hacknev 
H. G. Hedkick 
J. S. Jones 
R. E. Jordan- 
J. W. Knepp 



Fratres i.\ Urbe 

W. M. Lewis 
L. P. Mcl.ENnoN 
H. N. MiciiiE 
R. H. MicHiE 
F. C. Owen- 
J. R. Paiton 
J. E. Pecram 



D. L. Sasser 
L. S. Sasser 

L. H. FOMI.INSON 

E. S. Toms 
\V. H. r.VISIEAl) 
\V. 1'. Wilson- 



R. 15. Bruton- 



Fratrts IX L'niversitate 

Class of ig2S 
. . Candor F. L. Walker, Jr. 



Durh, 



J. M. Al.BERCOTTI . 

S. B. Adams, Jr. . 



(y/fW.f of Iij2g 

. . Orangeburg, S. C. J. E. ("riie, Jr. . 

. . Greensboro H. W. DoRSEri. Jr. . 
C. H. Margrave Lexington 



. Wilson 

Lexington 



M. J. Baum 
F. S. Best . 



Cltiss of iQjn 



Poplar Hram-h 
. . Dunn 



II. Hannah, Jr. . . 
M. K. Henderson . 



RcH'kv Mount 
. New Bern 



Class of igji 

I'LKDOKS 



F. H. Brinklev PortMnouth, Va. 

J. M. W. Crute Wilson 

L. B. Gilliland, Jr. . . . Clarksville, Va. 
W. P. Sellers . . . 



W. W. Graves, Jr. . 
K. 1. Mavo . . . . 
n. II. Pi iiii-FF . . 
. Norfolk, Va. 



Wilson 

Bethel 

Huntingdon, W. \a. 



2IJ 



THE CHANTICLEER 

> 1 Q2S 




IrHiajHJiJHfaja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• i £>12& > 



51515151515151 



PKi Delta TKeta 



Fnumlfd at Miami I'niver'-itv In i S4.8 

Colors: Arjjeiit am! A/iirc Fhnvn : White Carnation 

.Ict'ivv C/uiphrs : 96 , 1 lii/fini (^/mpii rs : 1 64 

Meinlicrship, 52,100 

North Carolina Ai.i'iia 

Established 1878 



T. M. Gorman- 



Fratres in Urbe 

J. B. Grisvvold 
E. B. Kent 



A. J. KviciiT 



Frank C. Brown 



Fratres in Facui.tate 
Benjamin G. Childs 



Edmund D. Sopkr 



Fratres in Universitate 

Graduate School 
Walter V. Moffitt 



Hanseixe L. Hester . 
Harrv B. Keher . . 



Class of IQ28 

. . W'inston-Salein Charles H. Miller, Jr S;ilislniry 

New Haven, Conn. Charles C. Weaver. Jr. ■ . Winston-Salem 



Class of igjg 

J. Howard Coitrell . . . Richmond, \'a. William H. Jenninos . . . Rocky Monnt 

Mercer W. Guthrie Hurham Claihorne C. Ross Dnrliam 

J. C. Hanes Pine Hall Frederick S. Fiiomas Durham 

Edwin S. Varbrough, Jr Durham 



Class of igji 



Zac Critte.nden . 
Alfred A. Goodson . 
R. A. Havnes .... 
George Hoopv .... 
Kenneth McDougall 
D. Clay McLaughlin , 



. Shellman, Ga. 

. Russellville, Ky. 

. Clevelaiul, (Jhio 

. Harrisburg, Pa. 

. Durham 

Ha)j;ersto\vn, Md. 



PLEDGES 

J. E. McNairv . . 
Marion S. Phili.ii'S 
Charles J. Poiis . 
C. Wiisris Randi.e 
RoBERi N. Ricks . 
Charles Ruph . . 



. Greensboro 

. Thomasville 

. Salisbury, Md. 

. Hickman, K\'. 

. . Rocky Mount 

Hagerstown, Md. 



mHJHfEraraiH 



THE CHANTICLEER 

■ 19 2a ' 




216 



irafgjzrajHjam 



THE CH 



A "N T - r» T 



CLEER 



515I5151S1515T| 



Kappa Alpna 



dolors: C'riiiiMiii aiul (Inld 

Jtlk-t (:/ni/>t,'rs: 65 



Flmars: Magnolia and Rrd Rum* 
.Iliimiii a/ui/'lit s: hi 



Alpha Phi Cii mtkr 

EstalilislKil lyoi 



I. P. Hrkkdlove 
c;. I). Cni.l.iNS 

liRV.W 15(11, ICH 



Mfki.k Adkins 
MoNROK Baldwin 
\V. D. Carmiciiael 
Arthur Ei.i.ioit 
Gkorce ELLiorr 

W. I.. FOISHEE 



Fratrks i\ F.\cri.T.\i 1: 

W. H. II All. 
F. K. Mnc'HEi.L 



Fratrhs in UruI'; 

Jn\ES Pll.I.ER 

F. S. Fuller 
R. A. Knight 
Mauler Kramer 
Allen Murikick 



Fratrhs IN' l/Nivi;R.srrATi; 

C!r/ii/it/it( Si li'jol 



J. M. Ormani) 
J. I'. Rii'i'\ 
W. I'. lowE 



n. \V. Newsom 
M. v.. Newsom 

A. M. RiCSBEE 

Fov RnnERSON 
J. I,. SeoiT 
r. K. \\'ri<?ht 



A. B. Carter . . 
V. B. Derrickson 



Mt. Ail\ JOHN CiUIL'E . . . 

. . . . New Bern Rivers McCai.i. . . 
Leon Russell Helena, Ark. 



. Conwiiy, Ark. 
Florence, S. C. 



M. P. BOLICH . . 

E. H. Cranford, Jr. 



Class of iqjS 

. . . Winston-Salem T. A. Davis . . . 

Ashcboro J. G. Kinn .... 

D. \V. Newsom, Jr niirhain 



Pamplin, Va. 
Centre, Texas 



Class <ij IQ2Q 

T. E. Allen- Durham \\. H. Mewhorne . 

W. E. Cranford Durham \\. A. Pierce . . . 

L. H. Kii.co Anderson, S. C. E. H. S.mith . . . 

\V. H. Waxnamaker, Jr Durhawi 



OrangeburK, S. C. 

. Wei (Ion 

. . Clover, S. C. 



J. P. Lucas . 
Fred Lyon . . 



Class of igjo 

. Charlotte J. T. NklNn'RF. . 

. Durham S. .\1. Rawlincs . 



Bristol, Teiiii. 
Emporia, \'a. 



Daniel Bull . 
Rawls Cobb . 
roscoe fore.man 



(J I ass of I'jji 

PLEDGES 
Greer, S. C. Bvron Grimes 



. . . . Durham 
. . Elizabeth City 
C. Zim.mer.vian . 



John Matheson . 

John Faccert . 

. St. Matthews, S. C. 



Hagerslown. Md. 

. . Mt. Clilead 

. Durham 



:'7 



IfHJEJHrajHiaJH] Tg^^HANT^CLEER 



51515151515151 





2lS 



IrzrajHfHJHiam 



THE CHANTICLEER 
• • 1 O lirt ' 



51515151515151] 



Pi Kappa AlpKa 



FiUiiuli-il at tilt I'liivervilv (it \'lr^iin:i, 1868 

Colors: C5ariiet and Clold ri(m,r: I.il>-(if-ilu--\'allcv 

.It/i-vr (Uni/>lirs: 72 tliimiii C/m/'his : 73 

MembtTsliip, 1 1 ,734 

Alpha Ai.imia Ciiaitkr 

Established 1901 



Dr. C. a. Adams 
F. S. BoDDit; 
R. M. Ganit 



Fratri;,s in L'rhk 

J. K. Masos-, Jr. 
\V. B. MlCJkary 

\V. C;. SCANLOX 



W. W. Slkdck 
Dr. F. C. Smith 

W. W. U'lI.I.IAMS 



Fr.atres in Universitatk 

Lmi' School 
E. J. Burns Carthage 



F. A. FiNLEY . . 
R. C. FlNLEV . 

A. P. Harris, Jr. 



Class of 11J2S 

. Asheville Charies A. Kirkpatrick . . . Thomasville 

. Asheville C. H. LllAKIiR Charlotte 

Albemarle M. \V. Rked Wavrusville 



Class of iQjg 

Wn.LiAM BizzELi Goldsboro Jack H. (Jibbons . . . 

Henrv C. Bost Erwin Harry Holi.ingsvvorth 

He.nry Folger Mt. Airy Roy A. Hunter . . . 

William A. Tumi ixson Troy 



. Hamlet 
. Newton 
Charlotte 



Class of 1 9 JO 

LiNDSEY HoLCOMB Mt. Airy James Miles . . . . 

DORTCH Langston Goldsboro Melvin Peeler . 

Henry G. Ruark Raleigh 



. Bristol, \'a. 
Wilmington 



Class of IQJI 
PLEDGES 



Ennms Atkins Gastonia 

Ed. Grimsley Kernersville 

Jack Hulinc Bristol, Tenii. 

Morris Jones Rome, CJa. 

WiNEi.ow Kendai.i Shelby 

Harris Lioon Shelby 



Ja.mes Mii.i.ican . . 
Jack Parroit . . . 
N'. F. TiRNER, Jr. . 
W. M. I'l'CiiLRCH, Jr. 
Sam Welch .... 
W. F. Hopkins . . . 



. Freeport, .Ala. 
. . . Kiiistoii 

. . . . Raleigh 
. . . . Raleigh 

. . WayiHsville 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



219 



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Sigma PKi Epsilon 



Fouruied ;it Richmoml University, 1901 

Colors: Royal Purple and Red Flowers: American Heauiv Ruse and \'ii)lets 

Active Chapli-rs: 55 .llumiii CJiapiers: 18 

Membership, 10,000 

North Carolina Gamma of Sigma Phi Ki'sii.on 

Established 1909 

Fratres in Urbe 

Robert D. Beam Bishop Erwin John (;. Parks 

WiNTO.v L. Pridoen IRVl^(; H. Wi.s'si.ow 



Frater in Facultate 

Dr. Charies E. Landon 

Fratres in Universitate 

Graduate School 
. . Oxford John C. Cai.e 



IVEV N. Al-LEN 



. Hendersonville 



Hugh H. Howell 



Fletcher Nelson Helena, Ark. 

Laiu School 
J. Allen Norris Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Class of 1(J2S 
Asheville James N. Truesoai.e 



Class of l()2g 

Gilbert Fonville Neuse James M. Moore . . 

W. W. McCoriER Alliance Luther D. Moore . . 

Richard \V. Mohn Louisburg Harding \V. Reynolds 

Ernest S. Smith Kinsion 

CI (US of IQJO 

W. Bruce Alexander Ayden Ernest E. Mitchell . 

J. B. Anderson Asheville J. Monroe Reams . . 

William Budd Prattvillc, Ala. Richard L. Sample . 

Ernest L. Jenkins Gastonia George W. Sanders . 

D. Cameron McDuffie .... Asheville James S. Stanley, Jr. 

Class of jgji 

PLEDGES 
Edward C. Bailey Greer, S. C. William O. Lee, Jr. . 



R. H. Chapman Marion 

Russell Charles Helena, Ark. 

H. Gilbert Holt Richmond, Va. 

Walter Kirby Gastonia 



Cleveland McConnei.l 
I. Marion Reams . . 
Lawson Reams . . . . 
John M. Sample 



Charles Spear Kinston 



Lincolnton 



Rock Hill, S. C. 
. . . Greenville 
. . . Critz, \'a. 



. . . . Willard 
Kingsport, Tenn. 
Fort Pierce, Fla. 
. . Atlanta, CJa. 
. Asheville 



. Danville, Va. 
. . . Asheville 

Oiinn 

Kingsport, Tenn. 
Fort Pierce, Fla. 



IrEJEiznuEram 



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515I5151515ISt1 



Sigma CKi 

Finiiulfil 1S55 
Colors: Skv Hhie and C,nU\ i-, ,,., . 

.■Jclhv Chapters: 87 //„„„„• chapurs: 63 

Membership, 25,100 

Beta L.amuda Ciiaitkk 

Estalilislied i(;i2 
FrATRKS 1\ l-".\Ll I.TATi: 

J. .F. Barnks II. J. iifiRRisc 

James Caxxo.v, III a. M. Proljor 

Fratres IX Lrhk 
Dr. M. T. Adkiss CJari.and Maves O L. Skinnf.r 

M. L. Barmiarui- Vaxcev Mu.niRN- G. W. Tan'ov 

Hunter Reams 

Fratres ix Universitate 

Graduate Srhnol 

W. A. Eli.isox, Jr Belhaveii 

LaiL' School 

J- ^- ^^^^ Charlotte I.. S. Blades, Jr Klizabeth C'itv 

G. T. Garreit Rockingham 

Class of iqj8 
B. B. Carstarphen' Williamston B. H. Creene Greensboro 

Class of ig2g 

\V. C. Adams Wilson A. N. Johnson Garland 

Henry Bennett Wadesboro Sprlili. Thornton .... Winston-Salem 

W. E. DUNSTAN, Jr Elizabeth Cit.v O. H. Thorpe Philadelphia, I'a. 

Class of IQJO 

H. A. Councii.or . . . Washington, D. C. 1). R. Dean Mt. Airy 

J. S. Dallas High Point Roland Farley- Danville, Va. 

T. J. J. Davis Danville, Va. R. K. Perkins Springfield, Mass. 

W. M. Werber Washington, D. C. 

Class of igji 
PLEDGES 

Emory Adkins Durham Milton Harrington Greenville 

Joe Cotton Weldon C. W. Harvey c;reenvillc 

Gerald Crona Portland, Maine Marcls Horhs Wilmington 

Travis Creole Washington Charles I.ivencood, Jr Durham 

Keith Di.xon Kinston Bovven Ross Washington 

David Sutet Greensboro 

223 



irafEjarEfHram iML^fjiNTK;LEER 




224 



irafHiaramrajzi iJig^HANTH:LKEK [smsismaai 



Pi K 



appa 



Pki 



KouiuiftI at C'(ilU-Kf (if ClKirliMnii, ClinrU-.-toii, S. C, 190+ 

Color,: Cold and While yi„^„. r,,, R,„e 

.l,lk;- C/iapiirs: 35 .llunuii Chapters: 16 

MemluTship, 3,5^4 

Mu Chapter 

Established 191 5 



Fratres in Urre 
A. H. HoRi.AM) W. N. FlnLi.nwAV 

W. S. BoKiAM) Earl Lose 

('. n. Bkichi- William Mlirdock 

C. C. Cook F. A. Pollard 

H. S. Pollard 



li. O. RlCSRKF 

F. M. Sasskr 
J. H. Vw.fM 

RonKRI I'VDKRWOOD 



I.. H. Kisnop 

J. S. BoONE 



S. C. Brawi.e-s , Jk. 
E. H. Bunting . . 
R. A. Cassidv . . . 
J. T. Jackson- . . . 



Frater IX Facultate 
William Blackburn 

Fratres in Universitate 

iiracluatc Schaol 

J- "■ H\" Statesvillc 



( J lass of i(j>H 

Durham J. C. Burvvki.l . 

. Jackson A. W. Pi:t:RAM . 



Class of ig2Q 

Durham (;. E. Turner . . 

■ • . New Bern R, S. Purs . . . 

rJcup Tt News, Va. W. R. Pirrs . . 

BaiTihridKe, Ga. C. E. WEAiHERnv 



Class of IQJO 



Henrv Griffin Monroe 

E. R. Teacue . . . 



J. S. Eeacm 



Madison 



. . w. 


rrentoii 


Winston-Salem 


Rnrk\ 


Mount 


. Glen 


Alpine 


• Glen 


Alpine 




Faison 


. Wnv 


lin^^ton 



Hal Dominick . 

O. J. GlLLETLE . 
W. R. HUNDLEV 



J. w. 



Class of lijji 

PLEDGES 

. Cordele, Ga. L. M. Johnson . . 

. . Smithfield S. C. Jones .... 

Hampton, \'a. T. J. Landon . . . 

Martin Newport News, Va. 



22$ 



. (Jreenshoro 
Okaloiia, Miss. 
. . . Clinton 



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51515151S15151 



Delta Sigma PKi 



Cnhirs: Nilf Green anil Wliite 
.litivf C/iafilits : 45 



Kiniiulecl i Si;y 



Mtmliership 7,000 



Floiirr: White (\irn;ilicin 
. I hull III dm piers: 21 



Alpha Ei'sii.ox Ciiaitkk 

Established 1920 



G. V. Allen 
l. l. gobbel 

Jamks Hadiuick 

Dr. p. N. (iAKBKR 



Fratrks in Urbe 

O. W. HnLLnwAv, Jr. 
Harrv Jordan 

Fratre.s in F.acl lt.ath 
R. E. Tmigpen 



W. B. Rankin 

Dave Rea 

Ci. \V. Hfverlv 



Pk. K. K. Wilson 



Fratres in Universitati; 

Lmv School 

A. B. Shepherd Heiulersonville 



Cratlualc School 



I. B. McLartv 



. Charlotte 



(Jl/iss of IQ2S 



H. A. Coffin Asheboro 

T. S. Eanes, Jr Lexington 

C. B. Falls, Jr King. Mountain 

D. L. Kelly Wilmington 



H M. Leight . . . . 
F. W. McCracken, Jr. 
W. N. McKenzie, Jr. . 
C. E. Smathers . . . 



. Walkertown 

. Santord 

. . Gibson 

Winsfoii-Salem 



R. G. TuiTLE, Jr Newton 

67c;,f,f of IQ2C) 

T. R. Barker Spencer \'. R. Lineback . 

J. L. Gibson Laurinburg L. M. Pkrkv . . . 

O. C. Godfrey Spencer R. F. Roper ... 

H. L. Westbrook, Jr Franklin, Va. 

Class of IQJO 



. . Winston-Salem 

Sanford 

Wa-hington, D. C. 



L. L. Alexander Charlotte 

F. W. Anders Gastonia 

J. S. Belle Gaffney, S. C. 

G. R. Bryant Richmond, Va. 

Sam Buie Winston-Salem 

D. C. Glassie Washington, D. C. 



H. C;. Howie Charlotte 

J. E. JANKOSKI Milwaukee, Wis. 

E. K. McLarit, Jr Charlotte 

C. S. Mlrphy Wallace 

C. E. Ross, Jr Ansonville 

H. C. Zachary Cooleemee 



Class of igji 
PLEDGES 



J. B. AcHESON Chicago, III. 

D. L. Alford, Jr Durham 

W. C. Freeman .... Washington, D. C. 

H. M. Gibson Laurinburg 

J. T. Gobbel Spencer 

P. W. Smith . 



L. E. Jones . . . 

J. L. KiRKLAND . . 
W. c;. Pearson . 
D. M. Roberts . . 
J. H. Sherrii.l . . . 
. . Cheraw, S. C. 



. Sanford 

. Durham 

. Gastonia 

New Bern 

. Cornelius 



^27 



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irHJHjaraiBjaja 



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> 1 012 a . 



51515151515151] 



CKi Tau 



I'Ouiulcil nt 'I'rinitx ('(illc-;^i-, i()2o 

Colors: White, Crimson ami CmiUI /Vototj: White, CriiiitsOTi and Velhiw R.ive liuils 

.Iclii'i- Chaptirs: y .\l,mhns/ii^: 1,000 



J. W. Carr, Jr. 



Alpha CiiArxF.R 

Kratri;s in Facli.tati; 

A. C. JURIIAN 



N. F. Wll.KKRSON 



S. B. Havrs, Jr. 
Joe Hunt 



FrATRES IX U Rul- 
es. E. Lefivvicii, Jr. 
E. K. Rick 



W. L. Tavi.or, Jr. 
A. A. Wilkinson 



Fratres in Univrrsitatf- 
Ciiadiuitf Sihitol 
J. A. McCain Greenville, S. C. E. P. McEiK . 



Ashevillc 



Lmv Srliool 



S. M. Hoi.TON Durham 

L. S. Laprade Durham 



J. C. I'Rnv . , 
M. C. Wli.soN 



. Durliam 
Ashevillc 



Clfiss of IQ2S 

W. 13. Farr, Jr Durham G. V. Fiii.p . . . . 

R. N. '1'homas Rcickinnham 



Kcrncrsvillc 



C. P. Barham . 
L. H. Cooper . . 



(Jims of l<)2Q 

Marion, S. C. T, D. Tysdn . . 

. . ■ Mebane J. W. Williams . 



. Mehane 
Charlotte 



CliUS of IQJO 

W. C. Calton Nashville I". M. I.iitle . . . 

C. A. Conner Charlotte W. A. Peoram . . 

D. T. Farr Durham E. S. Saint Amand . 



. Wadeshoro 
. . Hamlet 
Wilmington 



Class- of J (J J I 
PLEDGES 

H. V. Barnette Roxboro C). I'.. Mann . . 

B. A. Bryant Atlanta, Ga. W. S. Martin . 

E. K. EssEY Laurinburg W. A. Stone . 

L. V. Fischer Charleston, S. C. H. I.. Trotier . 

W. K. Harris Bristol, Tenn. Wade Ward . . 

J. C. Leonard Bristol, Tenn. J. M. West . . 



West Helena. .Ark. 

. WilmiiiK^on 

. . . . Charlotte 

. . Winston-Salem 

Bethel 

. Warsaw 



229 



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230 



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LamDda Cni Alpha 



Colors: Purple, Creen and Clukl 
.lilk;- Chaplt-rs: 76 



FouikK'iI H)09 



Membership, 12,000 



Flo<wer: \inlit 
llumni C/iaf'trrs: 37 



Gamma Tiifta Zeta oI' Lambda Cm Ai.imi \ 

Established 1924 



BrICE BlLMNGS 



('. S. Hammovd 



R. T. Hardavvav 



FratrHS IX Urhk 

L. S. C.RAIIAM r. N. CiRAIIAM 

Fratres IX Facultate 

\V. .1. 11. COTTOS- W. E. TiLSON 



Fratres in Uxiversitate 
Graduate School 
. . . Durham I. M. Kkhch Tarhori 



1 lallsboro 



Lmv Stfiool 

I.. B. H0LI.OWELI Winston-Salem J. E. Thompson . . 

J. C. Whisnant . Henrietta 



Class of IQ2S 

A. H. Cotton Durham W. C. Drake Macon 

R. J. Cra.vford Albemarle R. C. Horse Winston-Salem 

K. R. Laherstedt Brockton, Mass. 



Salisburv 



Class of i()3g 

O. C. Brutok Mt. Gilead J. L. Bi rke . . . . 

L. B. Christian' Durham 



Class of IQJO 

Marshall Campbeli (Jreensboro W. E. Johnstox Winston-Salem 

W. W. COTIEX Petersburg, Va. Ronald Riiidick Ardmore, Pa. 

Sammy Goode Greensboro L. R. S.mith ..... Middletown, Conn. 

C. V. Strader Greensboro 

Class of igji 
PLEDGES 

George Burch Rnxboro G. K. Massencili., Jr Raleigh 

Dos Carpenter Maiden Pall R. Massencili Raleigh 

Oliver Hicks Durham Blane Peerv Blucfield. \'a. 

Charles Hinternhoff . . Union City, N. J. Walton S.mith WiKon 

Henry Hottenstein . . . Millersburg, Pa. Daniel Siewart Raleigh 

James Jarrett Cherryville CJeorge Ivie Leaksvillc 



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rajHisrajHJHJH 



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515I515151515l1 



Delta Delta 



Colors; I'lirplf and Silver 



Kouiuled at Diikt- I nivcrsity, 19^3 



Flowi-r: I'iiik Rd 



WORIH Luiz 



Fratres in Urbe 
C. B. Oliver 



Jesse P. Pate 



Dean M. Arnold 



Fratres in Facultate 
R. H. SiiRvncK 



C. E. Ward 



Harry L. Bivens . 
\V. C. Floyd . . 



Joe T. Carruthers 
Jamie H. Exum . . 
Louis A. States, Jr. 



T. A. Bone . . . 
J. F. Evans .... 
C. LaMar Fair . . 
George B. King, Jr. 



James P. Cooper . 
Joe W. Mann, Jr. 
Jack Martin . . 



Fratres in Universit.\te 

iillldlKlIf Sih'Xil 

W. A. Mabry Riflgeway 

Class of igjS 

Monroe B. Fred Crigg (^astonia 

Fairmont M. R. Matiieson Raetnril 

Clnss of IQ2Q 

. . . . Greensboro Pai 1 D. \'easey Durham 

. . . Snow Hill W. Tail Whitman Boaz, Ala. 

Gastonia John L. Woodward Richlands 

Class of IQJO 

. . . Rocky Mount Nelson McCJary Durham 

. . . . Greer, S. C. Richard D. Noel Athens, I'enn. 

. . Harrishurg, Pa. Haywood H. Robbins, Jr CJastoni;] 

■ South Boston, Va. Alton Cj. Sadler Richmond, \'a. 

Everett B. Weatherspoon Durliam 

(Urns of I (J 3 1 
PLEDGES 

. . HarrisburK, Pa. J. Irvin Morgan Farmville 

. , . . Cireensboro (Jeorge E. Nash SulliK-nt, .Ala. 

Durham William J. Riiter, Jr LumberiDn 



233 



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234 



rafEJEJHJajajHj IHE^HANjjCLt^ER [515151515151511 



Pi Epsilon Pi 

Fiuiinled at Hiikc riiivcrsity, 1926 
Colors: Green and C,oU\ hlo'u.rr: WWxu- and Vcllou Rose 

Fratrks in Universitate 

Grculuiite SrlKjul 
S. N. Wkenn Henderson 



W. T. Hamlin 



J. W. Appi.euhitr 
I. W. Fltrf.i.i. . . 



(Uass of IQ2H 

Durham W. H. Hayes . . . 

H. A. Nichols Asheville 

Class ijj ig2(j 

■ ■ ■ . Stantonburg A. J. Hughes, Jr. . . 
. . . . Rich Square C. C. Rankin . . . 
E. S. Raper Winston-Salem 



Ourham 



Fountain Inn, S. C. 
. WilmiiiKton 



Class of IQJO 

S. P. Carson Raleigh J. S. Smaw .... 

Joe Savage Rocky Mount W. J. Wingate . . 

John Whisenant Maiden 



. . Kinston 

. Lincninton 



Class of igji 



J. \V. Almond . 
James Hanks . . . 
Charles Honevcutt 

Marvin Jovnf.r . 



. . Anderson, S. C. 

. . . Suffolk, Va. 

. Rich S<iuare 

Richard W'estcoit . 



PLEDGES 
.Albemarle \V. D. Murray . . 

William Ravvls . . 
Carl Stevens . . 
Fred Taylor . . . 
. Mcrchantville, N. J. 



. Rocky Mount 

. . . Suffolk, Va. 

. . . . Asheville 

New York, N. V. 



23s 



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236 



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51515151515151 



Sigma Tau Alpka 



Founded at Duke riiiversity, November, 1926 
Colon: Red and Blue Flower: Red Carnntion 

Frater in Facultate 
C. P. Hoover 



Fratres in Universitate 



' Class of iQZg 

T. F. CuLBRETH, Jr Favetteville 

R. H. EI.I.ISON Winston-Salem 

A. T. Griffin Goldsboro 

I. E. Harris Creedmoor 

D. K. Jackson, Jr Gastonia 



J. G. King Laurinlnirg 

J. T. Ramsaur . . . West Palm Beach, Fla. 

A. G. Smith Reidsville 

L. B. Vaughn Boone 

J. F. White Ruffin 



Class of 1930 

W. G. Coltrane, Jr Siler City B. L. Mumford Hanrahan 

D. R. Craven Concord R. R. Pearson Rocky Mount 

H. G. CuTHRELL Durham R. W. Reynolds . • Hemp 

R. C. Smith Ayden 



Class of igji 



J. H. BosT . 



PLEDGES 
. . . Winstnn-Salem D. B. Colter . . . 
A. P. Sands, Jr Reidsville 



Vandergrift, Pa. 



237 



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338 



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515l5T51inST5Tl 



Colors: Blue and Cinld 



C. Bryan Aycock . 
C. G. Biggs . . . 
R. A. Curtis . . 
W. X. Ireland, Jr. 



H. E. Lynch . 



Psi Delta Sigma 



Kourulfd at nuke I' Mivcr>it\ , April 21;. i<;27 



Faculty Advisors 

C. V0LLVIF.R 
E. \V. Nelson 



FrATRES IX UXIVERSITATE 

Class of jg2S 
n. R. Lumpkin . Purhn 



Cliiss of igjQ 

. . . Fremont R. \V. Lamm . 

. . Lillington E. H. LuTZ . . 

. . . Kinston \V. H. Myers . . 

Winston-Salem S. F. Nicks, Jr. 



Floixur: Sweet Pea 



. Wilson 

. Shelby 

. Edenton 

Hillsboro 



Class of igjo 
Goldsboro H. M. Sherard, Jr. 

Class of iQji 



Goldsboro 



PLEDGES 



John C. Dailey' . . 
Rudolph Best . 
I. F. Cunningham . 
R. B. Edmundson . 

BUFORD HAMBRIGHT 



. Durham 

. . Fremont 

Bainbridge, (ia. 

. . Stantonsburg 

. . . . Grover 



J. D. Lamm . . 
Edwin Lipe . 
Milton Loy . . 
J. P. McKini.ey 
Trov McKinney 



. . Wilson 
. Kannapolis 

. . . Shelby 
Mobile, Ala. 

. . . Shelby 



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H. I. Berlin Charles Max 

A. B. Book 
Nelso.v Rosen-berg Edgar Schlossbach 

240 



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Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council 

EiiiTH Parker, .Uflia Dilla I'i I'r,uj,nt 

Marie Tyler, Kappa I),lia I"u r-Pns'ulrul 

Rebecca Kirkpairick, Kappa .Uplia Tin-la Srinlary 

Margaret Draughox, Zila Tau .llplia . . . Treasurer 

Members 

Dorothy Jewette lip/,a Delia I'I 

Edith Parker Uplia Delia I'i 

Alma Wyche ///,/„, Delia I'i 

Ellen- Huckabee Kappa Delia 

Betsy King Kappa Delia 

Marie Tyler Kappa Delia 

Audrey Joiixson- Xna Tau .llplia 

Margaret Draugiion' Zeia Tau .llpl/a 

Virginia Stevens Zeia Tau Alpha 

Rebecca Kirkpatrick Kappa llplia Tliela 

Mary Scasi.o\ Kappa .llplia Tliela 

Margaret Royall Kappa .llplia Tliela 



IfHJHfETBJiJaJHj 



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242 



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THE CHANT^CLjEER [SISISIHISISISI 



AlpKa Delta Pi 



Founded at Wcsleyan CiilleKe, Macon, Ga., 1851 

Colors: Pale Blue and White Floiuer: Violet 

Active Chapiirs: 49 Membirs/iifi: 6,458 

Publication: "The Adelpheaii" 

Omicron Chapter 

Established 191 1 



Elizabeth Borland 
Mrs. Johv Clark 
Ruth Early 
Annie Garrard 
Katherine Guthrie 



SoRORES IN UrBK 

Margaret Hobcood 
Mrs. George Lyon 
Mrs. R. a. Michie 
Mrs. Louis Patton 



Janet Smith 
Mrs. J. H. Sikes 
Mrs. Emerson Tucker 
Margaret Wannamaker 
Mrs. R. a. Yoder 



Louise Anderson 



SoRORES IN UnIVERSITATE 

Gnuluate School 
Elizabeth Anderson Haw River 

Class of 1928 
Gastonia Elizabeth McKenzie . Timmonsville, S. C. 



Edith Parker Gastonia 



Class of ig2Q 

Annie Lou Caldwell Monroe Zoa Lee Haywood Durham 

Mary Arden Hauss Lincolnton Mildred Hudgins Marion 

Ellen Moses Norfolk, Va. 



Margaret Bennett . . . 

Lena Brooks 

Mary Gattis Holland . 



Elizabeth Caldwell 
Hettie English . . 
Elsie Neal Gibson . 



Class of IQJO 

Blackstone, \'a. Dorothy Jennejte Norlina 

. . . Durham DOROTHY PlLI.OW .... New Orleans, La. 

. . Smithtii-ld Alma Wyche Wcldon 



Class of iijji 
PLEDGES 

. . Monroe Frances Hill . 

. Mt. Olive .'Vlice Holmes . . . 

LaurinburK Isabel Wanna.maker 



. . Durham 

. Walkertnwn 

. . Durham 



Patronesses 
Mrs. N. D. Bitting Mrs. C. W. Peppler 



Mrs. R. L. Flowers 
Mrs. W. T. Minor 



Mrs. R. IL Shryock 
Mrs. \V. H. Wannamaker 



243 



IrafHrafaiiiam 



THE CHANTICLEER 

> 1 9 2S 




IfHfHJcJHJHJHJa 



THE CHANTICLEER 
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5l5151515lSIsi1 



K 



appa 



Deltc 



Fonrulcil at \'ir)4iiu:i SlMtt- N'nriiKil, I'ariiivilU-, \':i., 1897 

Colors: Olive c;rceii and White l-l,jv.;-r: White Ki.m- 

.Itlivi- C/iapiirs: 61 M,irili,rs/iip: 6, Soy 

Pulilualinn: "Tho AiikoIos" 

SuiMA Dki.ta Chai'ti:r 

Estahlisiieti 1912 



Elizabeth Aldriim^k 
Mrs. Max Barnhardt 
Mrs. W. G. Bra.viham 
Mrs. Watts Carr 
Olive Faucetie 



SORORES IN UrEE 

Mrs. W. p. Few 
\'iRt:iMA Green' 
Mrs. Page Harris 
Mrs. K. p. Lewis 
Mrs. John Michie 
Mrs. J. L. Morehead 



Ermine Peek 
Mrs. Don Sasser 
Mrs. Joseph Speed 
Elizabeth Tvree 
Mrs. Frank Webb 



Alice Roane Cross . 

VlOI.ETTE FAUCEITE 

Ellen Huckabee . 



Sorores IX Universitate 



Class of IQ28 

. Marion 
. nuihani 
Allicmaric 



Beryl Jones . . . 
\'iR(;iNiA Lee . . . 

DOROTHV SCIIALI.ERT 



Marie Tyler Durham 



• . Durham 
Portsmouth, \'a. 

. \^'instf)n-Sal^•ln 



I'na Kaufman 



Class of lQ2g 
New York City Ei.izareth King 



Albemarle 



Mary Branch Cator 



Class of IQJO 

. . New Yiirk City Frances Mason . . 
Leila Sell Liiicohiton 



Durham 



(J lass of igji 

PLEDGES 

Edna Boyd WavhiTiKtmi Virginia Mims . 

Lila Roane Cross .... Memphis, Tenii. Ei.eanoke Hope Peek 

Hazel Love Knight WihiiiiiKt"ii Fannie Powell . . 

Inez Leath Conway, S. C. Mary Walker . . 

Cornelia VARnRouGii Purhani 



. Reidsville 

. Durham 

. Henderson 

- . Durham 



Falroncsscs 
Mrs. F. C. Brown Mrs. C. W. Edwards 

Mrs. a. J. BuLLiNGTON Mrs. W. T. I.aprade 

Mrs. James Cannon Mrs. J. K. Mason 

Mrs. W. I. Cranford Mrs. A. M. I'RticioR 



-\S 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

• • 1 9 2d ' 



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246 



IfHJEJHJaiBJaJE 



THE CHANTICLEER 
• 1 £>L*a . 



515I5T51Sl515ll 



Zeta Tau Alpha 



Foiiiuleil :it Vlryiiiia State Noiinal, Karmvillc, \'a., 1898 



Colors: Argent ami Azure 

.J(7/V<' C/iaftt-rs: 52 



I'ublitalion : "'riiemis" 



Flower: White Vioiet 
Miinlnrsliip: 5,250 



Mrs. Irving Allen- 
Rose Davis 



Phi Chapter 

Estaliiislied 191 5 

SoRORKS I\ UrHR 

Mrs. R. H. Holdhn 
Mrs. Marvin Man<hm 
Mrs. Plaio Monk 



Mrs. Swindell 
Mrs. R. E. Thigpen 



SORORES IN UnIVERSIT.ATE 

Gradiitite School 

Doris Christe Durham Louise Purdy . . . 

Blanche Henry Clarke . Fort Thomas, Ky. Sara Stewart . . . 
Jessie Thompson CJibson 



Chis 

Margaret Draughok Whitaliers 

Mary Glasson I')urham 

Margaret Zachary . 



of ig2S 

N'iRciNiA Stevens . . 

Katherine Warlick 

Sanford, Fla. 



. Oriental 
Charlotte 



Richmond, \'a. 
. Granite Falls 



Monte C. Blalock 
Mae Foruham . 
Helen Hall . . . 
AiDREY Johnson . 



Class of IQ2Q 

. . . . Raleigh Maybe ni Steidi.ev High Point 

. . . . Kinston Helen Taylor Stovall 

Providence, R. I. 'Pauline Weber Danville, Va. 

. . Greensboro Dorothy Westbrook .... Franklin, \'a. 



Margaret Battle 



Mae Pearl Jones .... 

Mary Purpy Oriental 

Charlotte Stelling . . . Providence, R. I 
Elsie Williamson . 



Class of igjo 

. . . Rocky Mount Mauue McCracken 
Annie Piper I'msteao Durham 

Class of IQJI 

PLEDGES 

. . . . Laurinburg Catherine 'I'aylor . 



Durham 



Sue Warlick . . , 
Elizabeth Ward . . 
Durham 



Patrons an/1 Patronesses 

Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Angier Dr. and Mrs. H. E. Spence 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul M. Gross Mrs. Clement Vollmer 

Dr. axd Mrs. E. D. Sopkr Prof, and Mrs. A. M. Webb 

Dr. and Mrs. N. I. White 



. Rocky Mount 
■ Ciranite Falls 
Conway, S. C. 



247 



IrHfHrafHJHjajH " 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 Q2S • 




248 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

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Kappa Alpka Tketa 



Foiindeil at ncpainv riiivcrsity, 1870 

Colors: Black and Gold Flou;-r: Black ami Gold Pansy 

A (live Chaptt-rs: 56 M,mh,rsliit>: 14,000 

Beta Rho Chaptkr 

Established 1928 

SoRORES IN UrbE 
Hexrietia Still Adelaedk Rovall 



Rebecca Kikkpatrick 
Celene Phipps . . . 
Lillian Rogers . . . 



SORORES IX UXIVERSITATE 

Class of IQ2S 

. . . Thoinasville Lujan Stevvaki . 

Independence, Va. Marv Wvlie Stuart 



Charlotte 



Rachel Williams 



Hiroshima, Japan 

. Monroe 

• Elizabeth City 



Miriam Ashmore . 
Gladys Culberson 
Hal Grimes . 



Class of igzg 

Chapel Hill Mildred Holton 

Rockingham Monte Movle . 

. Lexington Marv Scanlon . 



Miami, Fla. 

. Lillinnton 

. . Durham 



Class of 1930 

Sara Alice Harris Seaboard Marv Frances Rodwei.l . . . Warrenton 

Helen Jenkins Clayton Margaret Rovali New Bern 

Elizabeth McFadven Concord Mabel Welton Durham 



Class of igji 

F'I.EDGES 

Marv Brown Raleigh Elizabeth Rlcker 

Eloise Lambert Ironmn, Ohio Zelle Williams . 



Rutherfordton 
. Wilmington 



249 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 Q2d ' 




To Tke Student Body 

^■^^^NOTHER Chanticleer announces the dawning of a greater 
and nobler Duke ! We wake at the sound, but with half- 
closed eyes we seem not to comprehend fully that another 
day has come. We see only the mist of early morning, ever 
elusive, ever changing, but gradually lifting. Who knows what the ris- 
ing of the sun may reveal! The 1928 Chanticleer cannot even pretend 
to indicate the wonder of the greater University in its ultimate glory, 
but it does attempt to portray the life and spirit of the transitional 
period which will lead to that greater Duke. 

It has been said that people are the most interesting creatures in all 
the world. Bearing this in mind, we have made an effort to record for 
you as best we might the lives of those people for whom the University 
exists and in whose spirit the Duke of today finds its being. We leave 
these people to judge as to whether or not we have accomplished our 
purpose. And so, with a last lingering caress of its plumage, we send the 
1928 Chanticleer out into Life's short day. 



May it so serve 

That when its summons comes 

To join the dust-covered books that lie 

On our shelves in after years, 

It shall go, not as some fleeting transient ivork 

Laid aside in unremembered thought. 

But cherished and recalled in halls of memory 

May it approach oblivion as one who. 

Even at the end of the trail. 

Reflects the spirit of Alma Mater. 



250 







Features 



IfHJEJHraJBJaJHj THE^HANTjCLEER 



51515151515151 



"There is a spirit in the kiiiJIituj //hi lire 
Of pure diu] lofty he/iiity, ichich doth r/iiell 
Each dtirker passion: (ind as heroes fell 
Before the terror of Minerva's lance, 
So Beauty, armed icit/i virtue, hows the soul 
With a coninianduu/ hut a sueet control, 
ISIakiiiii the heart all holiness and love. 
And liftnuj it to worlds that shine above." 

— BoiiN. 



The following pictures have been chosen by a ineinber of the Duke 

University Faculty as the very best out of a selection 0/ the most 

attractive of the Duke co-eds. 

— Editor. 



253 





Miss Mayheth Steidley 







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Miss Lillian Rogers 




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iss Louise Anderson 



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Miss Elizabeth Caldwell 



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Miss Lila Roane Cross 



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Miss Mary Brown 



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THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 

A NKWSPArKK. NOT AX INSTII'I TION 



Wi'iillier l''ore«'a-.l : 

WIk-ii K Kaiiis. 

l';\<-r>lliiiii; (i «• I s 

\ll Wot. 



Vol. Cano. I 



TYREE UNIVERSITY. N. C. 



I'RItt; Oae Scenl. Wcak'y 



THOMPSON WINNPR HESTER SPEAKS OF LOVE TRIANGLE RESULTS 



IN HARD CONTEST 
FOR GREAT HONOR 



HIS MANY VIRTUES 
TO AMUSED THRONG 



Husky F«o*lu»ll l*ln>t*r Is I*t*cl:ir.'<| Snct-cssful Hot Air C'olleKf I'lili- 
T.vpU'rtl Buu Bruninu'I; Uoss tU-imi Throws Hut Ir ''iiiiK uml 

Hill KiiiiiuT-l'p Kxtolf, Himself in ..ddr.-ss 



IN DEPLORABLE TRAGEDY 

TltlKSDALK'S BODY IJKS iX STATK AT KAIUKK 

SHor — KIKKIV\TIU('K TKIItK 

IVXLLKKAKKUS 



Till' Boau Bruminul CotU< st. 
which was hotly contested by the 
following candidates: Jas. Crute. 
Bruce Alexander, Jim Thompson 
Bill McKenie. and Boss HiU, was 
won by Jim Thompson at tht- last 
moment. 

For weeks the outcome was un- 
certain. Various methods were re- 
sorted to by the contestants to 
gain votes. Thompson appointed 
"Chin" Cole as his compaign 
manager and wore John L. Burl<e's 
suits to emphasize his need f<»r 
clothes. Alexander canvassed the 
"Shack" to get the votes of the 
girls. He went over unshaven and 
without a tie to excite pity, but 
tlie boys only hee-hawed him be- 
cause they knew that it was his 
natural attire. Crute brought his 
Cadillac up and. aided by Bill 
FrazitT, he hauled the boys to the 
polls. We have received com- 
plaints from fifteen boys that 
were kidnaped and forced to vote 
for Crute. McKenzie polled an un- 
usually large vote, due to the f:i<'t 
that his fraternity was lined up 
solidly behind him. Boss Hill 
was the only candidate who stood 
on merits alone, and would eas- 
ily have won. save for corrupt 
politicking by Crute and Alex- 
ander. 

The five contestants foi ght neck 
and neck for several wt-eks. and 
it seemed that the outfit was go- 
ing to have to be divided betwt en 
them. But after Boss Hill heard 
that Alexander was catering to 
the women voters and tliat Crute 
was giving bids to the Kappa Sig 
dance in exchange for votes. Jiis 
ire was kindled. He conferred 
with Thompson and offered to 
swing his (Hill's) votes to Thomp- 
son in exchange for life member- 
ship in the Lambda Chi Alpha 
fraternity. Thompson called an 
impartial committee composed of 
J. Foster Barnes. Jerry Hester. 
Fred Roper and Dean Hunt to in- 
quire into the ethics of this prop- 
osition. After due consideration 
the committee decided that Boss 
Hill, being a man of upright char- 
acter, was eligible for membership 
and besides, the Lambda Chi's 
hadn't been being so particular. 



"I am the man of destiny. Sin<-f 
earliest childhood I have felt 
within myself intimations of that 
potential destiny which now blos- 
soms and flowers before your 
eyes. I stand tonight upon the 
thrt-shold of a grt-at victm y, 1 
am confident of election in the 
forthcoming contest. From the 
uttermost corners of this mar- 
velous country of mine, assurances 
of unlimited support are bein^ 
wafted to me on the wings "i 
every fragrant brteze that blows 
in my ethereal air. Already 1 
am assured of the votes ot 
thousands of my followers among 
them being fifty thousand mem- 
bers of Phi Delta Theta, six 
thousand students of the Univer- 
sity which I made what it is, twn 
thousand employes of Mr. Separk's 
cotton mills, and two girls, one 
of them living at Dix Hill and the 
other being an especial friend of 
Charles Weaver. Without excep- 
tion these people recognize in me 
the future administrative genius 
iContinued on Page It) 



•\><>tball ('u|)lain-KI**<'t A'aiiqui.shes Kt'<l-Haiir(l Uixal 
Hand of Miss Parker 




Our Benefuelor 



so why start now? So as a n suit 
of this decision Thompson and 
Hill combined votes and Thomp.son 
won. Alexander fainted wli n he 
heard the results, and is now re- 
ceiving treatment in the state hos- 
pital at Morganton. Crute took 
his defeat vtry philosophically, 
explaining that he liked Stetson 
"D" clothes better anyhow. 

The outfit was receiveii by 
Thompson and appeared on the 
campus for the first time as fol- 
lows: Burke wearing the suit. 
Drake the shoes, Coode the shirt 
and tie, Campbell the hat. Shorty 
Cranford the underwear and sox. 
Thompson appeared in a pair of 
overalls, and reported that he was 
worse off than before, as he had 
lost several pounds trying to ful- 
fill promises to friends, and now 
his clothes wouldn't fit him. 
Brooks reported that they were 
well satisfied with the contest, and 
incidentally one voter bought a 
necktie one afternoon after cast- 
ing his ballot. 



A. D. PI SUED FOR 
FALSE STATEMENT 

I.ydiu rinkhnni Denies ! lie Wa*. 
Founder of rro^ninj-n! Sorority 

The famous libel suit of I.ydta 
E. Pinkham vs. the Alpha Delta 
Pi Sorority of Duke L'niversity 
opened today In Juv -nile Court. 
As is generally known, the suit 
grows out of the denials made by 
Mi.ss Pinkham to the statement 
that she is one of the founders of 
the A. D. PI Sorority. This siat<- 
ment is purported to have been 
first made by Miss Edith Parker 
and later became the slogan of 
the sorority during their rushfhg. 

The occasion of the suit was the 
use of Miss Plnkham'8 name by 
the Alpha Delta PI Sorority dur- 
ing the 132* rushing season. Sev- 
eral of the freshmen who went 
Alpha Delta PI admitted that they 
did so Jjecause they believed that 
Miss Pinkham was the founder of 
the club. The Zeta Tau Alpha 
lost heavily on this count and 
notified Mlsa Pinkham of the use 
of her name. 

Miss Pinkham. who immediately 
(Continued on Page 3) 



A IrngtMly of unusual pathos 
was enacted yesterday afti*rnoon 
in the Chanticleer office. Inviilv- 
ing thpi-e prominent Duke stu- 
(ients. As a result of severe 
wounds infiicted by Roy Hunter. 
foutljall captain-elect, the body of 
James X. Truesdale. Duke's fn 
n'ous red -headed piccolo p'ayr 
lies in state In the Unlversl > 
Barber Shojt. It was a (oucMnK 
scene to see the entire S. P. E. 
Lodge pass by the body to take 
one last lingering glance at the 
mortal remains of their notorious 
brother. It Is also report e^l that 
eight other student.t, among !h<'m 
Mr. LIston l*ope (who Is booting 
the corpse* viewed the body, jind 
Mr. Ervln reports a corresponding 
Increase In business. 

According to Information gleaned 
by a reporter for the W3iiniin' 
Poof this morning, the tragedy 
s -ems to be the result of another 
■love triangle" Involving one of 
the most popular Duke co-ed». 
Miss Efllth Parker. It seems that 
Mr. Truesdale and Miss Parker 
were mounting the A. D. PI panel 
in the Chanticleer offlre. when Mr. 
Hunter walked in. I'nlon llall 
having e|o.sed for the night. Just 
as Mr. Hunter walked In Editor 
Truesdale slapped Miss Parker's 
picture In the face In order to 
make It stay tight, since she had 
not had a date with John Bur- 
well since the free Senior Class 
reception. Mr. Hunter, thinking 
the slap was a deliberate Insult, 
immediately challenged Mr. Trues- 
dale to a personal ronfilct, and the 
latter, being red-headed. Inimedl- 
attely accepted. Hunter, beinjf 
piglltstlc. wanted to use footballs, 
but Truesdale preferred bottles, 
having been raised on one. As a 
handicap. Mr. Hunter also allowed 
Truesdah" to use his bass viol. 
Miss Parker agreed to referee the 
match, provided the loser take her 
to the Dope Shop. The whistle 
blew, and Hunter kicked off. 
Truesdale receiving It In the chest. 
(Conllnued on Pag* 3) 



THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 



SAWYER'S ACCOMMODATING 

NATURE HIGHLY LAUDED 



Fa 



mous 



Sa 



yings 



"President Few, you are fired" 



"Head" Tyree 



"This space reserved" "Head" Tyree 

BIG-HEARTED CZAR OF UNIVERSITY STORE WINS For ladies only" Albert cotton 

WARM SPOT IN HEARTS OF ALL -Me and My shadow Sim Boone 



STUDENTS 



College is a queer place. Every- 
one shifts more or less for him- 
self and the weaker man fares 
badly. It is a case of the sur- 
vival of the fittest. Still, where 
there are 1,500 people in one com- 
munity there must be someone 
whom everyone can call his 
friend and to whom he can turn 
in time of need. Every campus 
has someone to whom it can turn 
without hesitation and without 
fear of being rebuffed. 

That place on our campus is 
filled by no other than Big-Heart- 
ed Otis G. Sawyer. He has been 
with us for only two years, but 
In that time we all have learned 
to love him and have discovered 
that he Is always willing to ac- 
commodate us. 

He first endeared Himself to our 
hearts by his management of the 
book room. Since the oldest of 
us could remember, "Lap" had 
run the room and had allowed the 
students to charge their books. 
Big-Hearted Otis sprang into in- 
stant favor by doubling the prices 
on all the books and by insisting 
that spot cash be paid for all. 
He was always willing to cash 
checks and nearly drove the Dur- 
ham banks out of business. 

This year he decided that the 
students could not get the proper 
accommodation in the Dope Shop, 
which was run under the man- 
agement of "Red" Farr. so he de- 
cided to combine both Dope Shop 
and Book Store so that he would 
be able to grant favors to a larger 
number of students. 

So he rented a 2x4 space and 
equipped it with a soda fountain 
and a counter which all gentle- 
men are urged to use for a loung- 
ing place. Visiting boys are in- 
vited to sleep on It at night. Next 
Big-Hearted Otis decided that the 
old Dope Shop had been in the 
wrong by not letting the student 
body use the telephone, so he ran 
a statement in the "Chronicle" 
urging all students and particu- 
larly faculty members to use the 
Dope Shop telephone. Especially 
are the students ur^ed to use the 
phone for long-distance calls, 
Big-Hearted Otis footing the bills 
himself. 

One would think that by this 
time Big-Hearted Otis had done 
enough for the student body, but 
there was no ostentation to his 
philanthropy. He figured that 
some way must be devised to cash 
checks for the student body. 
Under the old Dope Shop regula- 



tions checks were cashed only 
upon University endorsement. Saw- 
yer decided that it was too great 
an inconvenience to the students 
to require them to get their checks 
endorsed, so he announced that all 
checks would be cashed for any 
amount without college endorse- 
ment. This plan worked well for 
a while, but it was soon discov- 
ered that enough change could not 
be gotten each morning to take 
care of the number of checks 
which were to be cashed. The 
student body was nonplussed, but 
not Sawyer. He felt that the 
students must be accommodated, 
so his quick thinking brain de- 
vised the system which is now in 
use. The results have been very 
satisfactory. Each check is cashed 
and Sawyer now does nothing but 
provide funds with which to cash 
the checks. He has purchased 
himself a pair of roller skates and 
skates back and forth to the bank 
with each check. In order to 
keep the students from having to 
wait for him to make the trip, 
he cashes each check with his 
personal funds and then takes the 
check down to the bank. He is 
a friend especially of the hard 
luck boys, and he always delights 
in cashing checks for boys who 
have had six or more returned. 
No student can now complain of 
not having a place to have his 
checks cashed. Big-Hearted Otis 
sees to that! 

He always has the interests of 
the boys at heart. He was so 
afraid that Red Bird and Charlie 
Abbott were working too hard 
that he appealed to the Humane 
Society to stop them from selling 
apples, candy and sandwiches iu 
the dormitories, generously offer- 
ing to stay open over time to pro- 
vide the boys with food that 
Charlie and Red had been fur- 
nishing them with. This added 
greatly to Sawyer's popularity. All 
of the boys thought that Charlie 
and Red had been working too 
hard, but none save Otis would 
expend the time and money neces- 
sary to stop them. Then he at- 
tempted to charge Werber. Coun- 
cilor and Jenkins a royalty on the 
goods they sold at the football 
games because he believed that 
they were making too much 
money and he feared that they 
would spend their excess funds 
in dissipation. Space will not 
permit us to eulogize him prop- 
erly, but we can sum him up 
briefly by saying that he is a 
sublime combination of altruistic 
love and superb intelligence. 



"Let the Rest of the World Go Buy" John Burwell 

"Here. Pup" Jinks Waggoner 

"Humph" "Bull" Brown 

"W^ee-nee" "Shorty" Kirkpatrick 

"H 1, Jimmie, go easy on those s' amps" Cecil Smathers 

"Competent Counsel" Data Cotton 

"I'd rather be a freshman than dean" Dean Wannamaker 

"President in 1950!" Hanselle Hester 

"I'll Be Loving You. Always" Doug Kelley 

"They call me Clara because my legs B w" Elsie Neal Gibson 

"Such popularity must be deserved" Betsy King 

"They can't resist me" Charles Elizabeth Hamilton 

"I ain't married — rneumatism m:ikts me look iike this".. Bob Hatcher 

"Pay your Alumni Loyalty Pledge" "Dick" Thigpen 

"I refuse to neck in public" "Head Tyree 

"I've had my two dates — here's your candy" Carlton Weatherby 

"Oh. Foster, maybe next year all the sotB will be gone".. Mrs. Barnes 
"I'll challenge you to personal conflict" .... Profi ssor "Shorty" Gregory 

"Now, I .isk you— is that niccV" Edie Parker 

"Girls, be careful of your re.ations with ycung men. "..Dean Baldwin 

"I say so. too. Miss Baldwin" Louise Seabolt 

' 'Scuse me; I thought I was at the Chi Tau ba.iquet" . . John Faulkner 
"The beautiful thought toward which we are groping". .. .Prof. Sears 



DO YOU OFTEN SPILL IT? 

Is Your Mouth Too Small? The Famous Spill-None Fimnel 
IT DRINKS WHERE YOU HOLD IT 

READ Ol'K TESTIMOiSIES: 

"Since buying my Spill-None I have not lost a drop." — Harry 
HoUingrsworth 

"It just fits my mouth." — "Stub" Stanfle'ld. 
"I could not do without it." — IMax C. "Wilson. 

WE HAVE MILLIONS MORE, INCLUDING COLLEGE PRESIDENTS 
AND DEANS. 

THE SPILL-NONE FUNNEL COSIPANY 

JlMSn' TRIIESDALE, Campus Bepresenta.tlTe 



"At the break of dawn, 
AVith all the make-up jjone" 

WTio Says I'm Not Tivo-Facea! 

DOT SCHALLERT 

Agent for Coty's Perfume ana 
Kappa Delta 



THE WHIFFLIN" POOF 



MEN'S ASSOCIATION 
FACES BANKRUPTCY, 
SOUNDS S.O.S. 



Evtry man oil tlio campus is 
t-arnostly roquested to report to 
Secretary Joe Canuthers and pay 
a flfty-ccnt, seventy-flve-cent or a 
dollar foe, or more if he is so 
disposed, to help defray the ex- 
pi-nsos of the Men's Association. 
If you have paid once, that makes 
no difference; come across again 
and help your fellow students. 
The whole personnel of the Coun- 
cil is in straitened financial con- 
ditions. Below are some of the 
items which should induce every 
man to "open up" and do his bit 
for those who are working so hard 
fur his benefit. 

The Vice-President of the Asso- 
ciation has just returned from a 
hilarious Glee Club tour and Is 
soon going on another. Help him 
to enjoy himself. 

The Secretary of the Associa- 
tion has an amorous business 
which he must attend to very 
regularly. As this business is in 
Greensboro, there are naturally 
expenses. Remember him! 

The President belongs to the 
Scotchmen's Club, but he can't 
exist upon the good will of his 
fellow students. 

If you would keep John Burwell 
and Jerry Hester "squared " 
please pay. They also have their 
"little affairs." and since it is al- 
most Easter, we advise that an 
order for flowers be enclosed with 
the contribution. 

"Amie" says that finances do 
not bother him, so please check 
the item that you wish to support 
in order that none of the funds 
will gut into the wrong hands. 
Signed, 
THE ASSOCIATION 



fiOVK TUIANGliK 

UKSri/IS l\ 1)K- 
IM.OKAIiLK TK.V(;KDY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Truosdale played Ti natural on his 
viol, but the referee penalized him 
thirty yards iy)r holding. Hunter 
attempted a run around Trues- 
dale's eml. but was stopped in liLs 
tracks. Truesdale raised the bot- 
tle on which he was raised, and 
the kick was so powerful that it 
sent Hunter down for the count 
of nine, Truesdale appropriately 
playing B flat on this occasion. 
By this time the room was flllt-d 
with innocent bystanders who were 
standing by. among them J. Fos- 
ter Barnes, who was offlclatinK in 
his capacity as Social Director. 
The conflict waxed furious. Hun- 
ter went down again, and he and 
the moon came up at the same 
time, having things in common 
with Jimmy Smathers. Hunter 
went through Truesdale's guard 
for a touchback. and the latter 
hit the floor with a thud, break- 
ing- a dozen bottles. At this 
juncture a spectator is said to 
have shouted, "Give him a pillow! 
Give him a pillow!" Truesdale 
immediately went into a violent 
fit. passing to warmer climates a 
few minutes later. 

Last rites will be held in the 
Puritan Lunch tomorrow morning 
at 2 o'clock. Pallbearers will be 
Messrs. "Shorty" Kirkpatrick, 
Charles Kirkpatrick, C. A. Kirk- 
patrick and Atkinson Kirkpatrick. 
Liston Pope will be Master of 
Ceremonies, paying all bills. It 
is rumored that Miss Parker will 
sue Mr. Truesdale's estate (if she 
can find it) for an apple, since 
the loser was to take her to the 
Dope Shop. The tragedy has 
created a good deal of excitement, 
and it is hoped that many more 
such enjoyable occasions will be 
held in the near future. 




'\oifS 



m: isi l^l•:^^; .m.\n.\<;kk <;oks ai tkk iukwkm. 



MEN! ATTENTION! MEN! 

If you grow hot or uncomfortable 

SEE US WE'RE WILLING 

Kappa Delta Cooling Plant 



CHI TAU 

Big Menibershi]] 
Drive Now On 

Reduced Rates 

BRING YOIR FRIKNI) 
SKE JKLIA' IjKFTWICH 

CHI TAU 



Pi Kappa Alpha 
Brewery 

Send Vour Order 
Early 

HEXKY BOST 

Official Representative 



HESTER SPEAKKi; OK 
HIS MANY VMM IKS 
TO AMISKD THU()\(; 

(Continued from Page U 
o^ the age and of all time. Why 
should they not? Did 1 not come 
from Winston-Salem, from which 
only the good can come? Did I 
not edit the best "Chronicle" In 
history until Dean Wannamaker 
told me to make It more of a 
newspaper and not so much of an 
institution? Did I not take Pub- 
lic Speaking under H. J. Herring, 
the results of which you are now 
privileged to hear? Was it not 
I who, through graft and politics, 
became the outstanding member 
of the Illustrious law firm of 
Blakeney. Herring and Hester? 
What more can any ojie/i- minded 
' il izen expect '!" 

Thus spake Hanselle I*. Hester. 
iiiiUpLndent nominee for President 
"I the United States Rar tenders' 
Association in an address deliv- 
er* d hire last evening. Chisman 
Ilanes, campaign manager for Mr. 
H(-ster, introduced the justly 
famous candidate. Mr. Hester has 
for many years been In the moon- 
light as a successful bootlegger. 
It will be remembered that a few 
years ago Mr. Hester, while op<?r- 
ating a saloon in Winston-Salem, 
let his business get the best of 
him, became thoroughly Inebriat- 
ed, and made a plea for temper- 
ance In such an eloquent manner 
to his fellow townsmen that the 
entire population became total ab- 
stainers, forcing the erstwhile op- 
erator out of business for the time 
being. It is thought, however, 
that this incident will Influence 
only very slightly the decision In 
the forthcoming elections, since it 
is known that practically all of 
Mr. Hester's friends are all "wet." 



A. I), n sri;i) kou 

FALSE STATEMi:\T 



1 1 'ontlnued from Page 1 ) 

iiLstitutid legal proceedings against 
the sorority on account of th<- 
alleged misuse of her name, 
reached Durham today In her 
private car. She was presented 
with the keys to the campus by 
a joint committee composed of 
"Head" Tyee. Boss Hill and Mrs. 
J. Foster Bivnes. She brnikfast- 
ed at Union Hall, and (hen mo- 
tored down to the Washington 
Duke, where she could eat and go 
to bed to rest In preparation for 
her ordeal of appearing at the 
trial. 

When Interviewed this morning 
by a reporter Miss Pinkhum gav.- 
the following statement: "My llf»''N 
work has been a bottled attempt 
to benefit girls, and it pains me 
greatly to be forced to deny any 
one groui> of budding womanhood 
the privilege of using my name. 
But 1 have always felt that thi- 
sphere of my Influence would be 
more universal were I to decline 
having any secret or unsecret so- 
ciety named after mo. My suit 
against Alpha Delta PI is more 
of a preventive than a punitive 
measure, but such an Indiscretion 
must not occur again." 

Complete details of the trial 
will be published In the morning 
edition of the Whldlln' Poof. 



A heart-breaking mama. 

I might state — 
Have you seen Sally Koto 

When she didn't have a date? 



THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 



oiir? aniitffan ponf 



Published Too Often 



Entered as First-Class Slander in 
the Post Office of Calumny under 
the Prohibition Act, 



New wit reci'ived daily from Jinks 

'Waggoner, who now has only 

half of iliis left. 



The Staff 

Hats Fonston Chief Whiffler 

Piston Lope Chief Poofer 

Farold Bellison. ...Head Mutilator 
Lohn Hocke Murke. .Bilious Mgr. 

Breston Noses Hart Editor 

Tester Lodd 

. . .Social Hintercoarse Editor 
Herry Jester. .. Brinter's D 1 



EDITOR'S COMMENT 

To those who had their pictures 
made and did not return their 
proofs; to those seniors who made 
no attempt to give us their 
write-ups and honor slips; to 
those who haunted our office 
looking at every proof and read- 
ing every manuscript; to those 
who made suggestions but gave 
no assistance ; to those who were 
continually asking when the 
"Chanticleer" would be off the 
press; to those who let it be 
known that they would criticize 
the annual minutely as soon as it 
was released; in short, to all those 
who have aided in sending the 
editor to the dogs, we do fervently 
dedicate all errors, poor judgment 
and shortcomings to be found in 
this volume of the "Chanticleer," 
and we do quote with reverence 
this verse written by a brother 
editor: 
"Our pen is dry, 

And the ink's all gone from the 
well ; 
If this book pleases you, tell us^ 

If not, just step to h 1." 



EDITOR'S MIND 



AN EDITORIAL 

ON FRAT PINS 

Almost any lovely lady is satis- 
fled with a string of pearls, a 
platinum brooch, and a diamond 
glinting somewhere between her 
jewelled comb and her cut-steel 
buckles. She cares no more for 
ornaments than Omar did for 
hooch. Which is where lovely 
women differ fi^om the stalwart of 
the species. A man is satisfied 
with one pink frat pin. 

No guy has made the most of 
his education unless he comes 
from college with a frat pin on 
his chest. A bird that spends 
four years in the front-line 
benches without bagging a cam- 
pus Croix-de-truerre is skipping 
close to the nix column. He must 
fate the world without a fancy 
hatband, without a mystic grip 
to slip all comers, and witliout the 
Greek alphabet peeking from his 
vest. And that's some handicap. 
Since sport shoes came down to 
$6 a pair, it is getting harder and 
harder to distinguish the college 
guy. 

There are 11,926,012 combina- 
tions of the Greek alphabet and 
just that many frats. Everything 
secret nowadays is labeled alpha 
and omega, including salad dress- 
ing and liniment formulas. Any 
guy that lopes through college 
without being tagged for some 
Greek outfit is a dud with a cap- 
ital D and a missing fuse. 

The frat guys are the outstand- 
ing gazinks of the dear old Alma 
Mater— the boys that drink tho 
midnight fusel oil. The collegiate 
Ku Klux is the real thing in the 
mystic department. And the 
Greek letters are code language 
for something hidden and unseen, 
as for example, Beta Vodka Delta 
for B. V. D.'s. The boys that 
peddle the hush dope make a 
moonshiner look like a public 
character. 

All the real folks have been 
tagged for honors. George Wash- 
ington belonged to the Kanna 
Telia Lie fraternity. Babe Ruth 
has joined the Hitta Lotta Runs, 
and Ponzi belongs to the I. O. U.'s' 

No frat brotlier is complete un- 
less he has a triangle of platinum 
pinned where he spatters his 
breakfast eggs. The real thing in 
frat fixings is a couple of spare 
parts of the Greek alphabet en- 
closed by a barrage of baby pearls 
and Attleboro diamonds. The 
aleck that carries one of those 
hokey-pokeys over his fifth rib is 
a loud bang in frat circles. And 
every year they murder 120,000,000 
oysters just to get pearls for the 
edge of those pins. 

The big minute in a frat guy's 
life is when he gives a girl that 
pin. The skies quiver and the 
gods halt until the safety clasp 
pierces the dame's georgette. Ac- 
cording to all the by-laws and 
umpty-umpty of the sacred frat, 
the lady is now engaged to the 
fiuy that just gave up the pin. It 




I>ittle Boy: "Oh. father, look at the tramp!" 

F-ather: "No. son, tlhat is no tramp. That is a college grmduate 
witli a diploma." 



is a thrilling moment — especially 
to a Jane who can't read Greek. 

Another star-spangled ceremony 
connected with the Balkan alpha- 
bet is slipping the old frat grip. 
The grand and solemn handclasp 
has all the movements of a cor- 
net solo without the cornet. When 
Greek letter guy meets Greek let- 
ter guy then comes the tug of 
paws. There is no thrill like feel- 
ing the authorized squeeze of a 
brother frat head. And there are 
more victims of the Greek grip 
than there are of the Spanish in- 
fluenza. 

The intricate moves of the reg- 
ular handclasp makes the Bertil- 
lion system look like a rough de- 
scription. But even so, the grip's 
a good thing for the college boys 
—it's the one kind of manual 
labor they fall for. And that's our 
argument. You don't have to be 
a frat guy to get by in life, but 
it helps. When you're broke and 
starving miles from home, you can 
always hock the frat pin. 

Things We Would Like to See 
at Duke. 

Undressed Chickens. 

Spruill Thornton without sex 
appeal. 

Nick Carter as "Beau Brummel" 
(he needs the clothes). 

The A. T. O. vtctrola at the 
bottom of Crystal Lake. 

Bruce Alexander wearing a 
tie. 

John Burwell spending a nickel. 

Dr. Wannamaker cutting chapel. 

Aesthetic dance by "Head" Ty- 
ree. 

"Bo" Robison on a hot date. 

"Black Bottom" by "Have- 
Mercy" Bynum. 



THREE FREEZE IN DORM 

The campus community will be 
glad to know that Mr. Tyree, in 
his valiant effort to save the mil- 
lions which are intrusted to liis 
care, has added a new record to 
his long list by saving one cent 
on last month's coal bill. This as- 
tounding record for economy has 
nonplussed the economic profes- 
sors and a detailed study of the 
circumstances will be made in the 
near future. Dr. Wannamaker, in 
an interesting interview, stated 
that Mr. Tyree had fulfilled the 
fondest hopes of the administra- 
tion in employing him, and that 
he expected to see our finances in 
tip-top shape in short order. 

Last rites will be held for three 
freshmen who froze to death in 
dormitory number four sometime 
during the night of February fifth. 

ZOPER EXTOLS 

MERMAIDS 

Dr. Edmund D. Zoper returned 
Saturday morning from Atlantic 
City, wliere he attended the na- 
tional beauty pageant of America. 
He delivered a lecture on TThe 
Contribution of the Modern Bath- 
ing* Beauty to the Social and In- 
dastrial Life of the TJaited States. 
Dr. Zoper traced the career of 
bathing beauties from Eve to the 
present co-ed. Dr. Zoper is an 
interesting lecturer, and his famil- 
iarity with his subject, coupled 
with his charming personality, en- 
abled him to impress favorably 
a large audience. Incidentally, 
Dr. Zoper reports a fine trip and 
very enjoyable and inspiring scen- 
ery. 



THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 



FINAL PLANS FOR PLANS FOR UTOPIAN 

DUKE UNIVERSITY HONOR SYSTEM HERE j ..„»■. 



WHO'S WHO AT DUKE 



Iluiirt Hrcjikcr 



I>r. Brown Sti.vs Hy<1rants Will lie 
ArtiHvinl Geysers 



F. C. Brown, distinsuished mem- 
ber of the Duke faculty, in an 
interview yesterday with the re- 
porter of the "Whirtliu' Poot"," 
stated that plans for the beautirt- 
cation of the prest-nt campus were 
near completion. A detailed out- 
line or" the work to be done was 
Ki\eii the reporter. 

One of the most interesting 
phases of tile work to be done 
is to convert the numerous fire 
hyilrants on the campus into arti- 
ficial geysers. Mr. Brown ex- 
plained that this was to be done 
by cutting off the tops of the 
h>drants. He says further that 
the hydrants will be painted with 
blue and white stripes, betoken- 
ing his omnipresent desire to co- 
operate with and please the stu- 
dents of the University. A novel 
suggestion was offered by Mr. W. 
A. Tyiee. prominent economist 
conneited with the administrative 
staff of the University. Mr. 
Tyree plans to plant beans and 
Irish potatoes near the geysers, 
thus cutting out the cost of 
watering the shrubs on the cam- 
pus and at the same time furnish- 
ing supplies for the Union. Mr. 
Brown believes that these plans 
will make the Duke campus the 
"wettest" in the state. 

A plan for greatly enhancing the 
beauty of the campus was agreed 
upon by Tyree and Brown. They 
plan to construct greenhouses on 
the great open spaces of the 
grounds. Tyree believes that he 
can cut down on the heat in the 
dormitories, which, he states are 
already overheated, and use it in 
the greenhouses. Mr. Long, stew- 
ard of the Union, plans to grow 
bananas and prunes in the green- 
houses. Mr. Brown explains that 
the green and white of the green- 
houses will harmonize beautifully 
with the red of the buildings and 
the many colors of the slickers 
on the campus. 

An unusual innovation was of- 
fered by Mr. Brown when he sug- 
gested that mirrors be placed at 
legular intervals on the walks and 
in the buildings. He believes that 
such an act will encourage pride 
in the personal appearance of each 
individual student, and at the 
same time it will multiply the 
beauties of the buildings and the 
blossoming peach trees, thus elim- 
inating the cost of further im- 
provements. 

Mr. Brown intends to start work 
on the new projects immediately. 
Upon Tyree 's suggestion, he will 
depend upon the altruistic nature 
of the students to move the dirt 
and gravel back and forth free of 
charge. 

Mr. Brown states that his plans 



Teu Sugrgrestiouti Offered for 
provuig Coiiilitioiisi 



(1) Students will be marched to 
the examinations In single Hie and 
halted at the classroom door, 
where they will be searched for 
little bits of information written 
on the backs of envelopes and inii- 
cealed on the person. 

(2) Each student will be sub- 
mitted to a psychological test by 
Dr. McDougall to determine if he 
has any idea of cheating. 

i'i) Classrooms will be decorat- 
ed with mottoes such as "Hon- 
esty is the best policy," "Think 
before you cheat." and "I got 
mine before we had an honor sys- 
tem." 

(4) Each student will be <«>m- 
pelled to wear "horse blindi-is." 

(5) Students will sit two seats 
apart, with professors standing in 
each interval. Professors will be 
armed with a blackjack and a 
bottle of arnica to be administered 
if one of the students is found 
cheating. 

((5) Additional professors on the 
outside will watch through peep- 
holes in the wall. 

(7) High-tuned dictaphones will 
be attached to each desk to catch 
the slightest whisper. 

(S) When the student has fin- 
ished the exam, a lie detector will 
be brought out and the student 
will be asked if he cheated. 

(y) In grading the papers the 
professor will discount ten per- 
cent from the grade on the possi- 
bility that the student has 
cheated. 

(10) More men will be brought 
to Duke like Spruill Thornton to 
report infractions of the honor sys- 
tem by sixty per cent of our stu- 
dents. 



are in full accordance with the 
financial condition of the Uni- 
versity. He states further that if 
it were not for the inestimable 
aid of Mr. Tyree in planning the 
economic means of carrying out 
the projects he would not have so 
much as ventured on such an im- 
mense undertaking. 



Macbeth StHdley InHtructor In Fancy NecklnK 

The A. I>. Pi Sorority World's Champion Gum Chewei-H 

Sprtiill Thornton King of Monkeyn 

Jerry IleHtcr Soap Box Manufacturer 

"Head" Tyree Vlrsin Movie King 

Uetui Hunt T'llot on the Campun 

••|>o<r' Chamhers Paper Dealer 

"Zip" Bniwley Cedar-Bird 

J. l-'oKter liarnes Social Director 

riuvrlie Jordan Filler of Ink Well; 



The Z. 



Stringera 



Cliief Inspector of CuBpldom 

"Doe" Speed "fleet's" Inventor 

John Burwell Harry Lauder's Side-Kick 

Otis G, Sawyer Check Casher 

"Head" Tyree General Nuisance 

fJuwIie Klizaheth llnmilton Answer to an Old Maid's Prayer 

Albert Cotton Instructor In Boxing and Wrestling 

iJstoii Pope Budding Poet 

"Half-Pint" I'ierce Mama's Uurly- H ■:..!■ d l>arllng 

Dot pillow The Pan-Helhnic Girl 

I>ot Jennette Walking "Ad" for "Pep" 

Jimmy Truewdale The cute llUle "red-headed bull-slinger" 

Kay Uarpenter Matrimonial Expert 

"Buttercup" Carstarphen Agent for Gossard Corset* 

"Jelly" Leftwich Specialist In Flute Playlne 

Polly Weber 



Candidal.' for (^;o\ern.»r 



CARD OF THANKS 

Another Chanticleer is off the 
press. Whatever praise thert- is 
for the book will go to the Pub- 
lication Board and to Mr. Barn<-s 
for being such an efficient Social 
Director. Nevertheless, the staff 
has several people whom it wishes 
to thank. 

The editor wishes to thank all 
the mothers who have suggested 
to him that he run their daugh- 
ters as sponsor. Also he wishes 
to thank Jerry Hester for coming 
into the office on divers occasions 



and separating hla extra prints 
from the various organizations 
and commenting upon his own 
noble features to hordes of ad- 
miring females. 

The business manager wishes to 
express his supreme thanks and 
appreciation to those members of 
the faculty who from their lofty 
perch on the chapel platform so 
willingly and benignly made our 
announcements about the photog- 
rapher and with a sorrowful 
shake of their heads told the .stu- 
dents that graft was being prac- 
ticed in the 1928 Chanticleer sole- 
ly because they felt that it was 
their moral duty. The business 
manager furthermore wishes to 
tliank all the boys who paid their 
class space on May 31. and all the 
accounting students \\hn frr'-ly 



advised as to the best method of 
keeping books. 

The entire staff wishes to ex- 
press their appreciation to the 
students who came into the of- 
fice and sat around and kept us 
company while we worked, to 
"Shylock" Sawyer and "Head" 
Tyree for allowing us to present 
this fifteenth volume of the Chan- 
ticleer to the students, and to the 
Scotch Club for the lovely ban- 
quet they tendered us upon the 
announcement that the Annual 
was on the press, and to the 
countless self-appointed cutles 
who offered us helpful sugges- 
tions. To all of these and to num- 
bers of others whom space won't 
permit us to name we, the staff of 
the 192S Chanticleer, do express 
our undying appreciation and 



rl'- 



TitM')-- 



MATRIMONIAL BUREAU 

See Us Before You Make the Fatal Choice 

We support an orphan, clearly proving that we love 
home life. And then, too, we are all such homely 

ALPHA DELTA PI 



THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 




THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 



SOCIAL INTERCOUPxSE 



PERSONALS 

Th." iHdl;itors in tlic Zrta Tau 
Alpha sortton liave boen rt-- 
nioved slncf tlu- pletlRing: of 
Misses Mae Pearl Jones and Cliai- 
lotte Stelling. 



The Pi Kappa Phi's ha v.- at 
last found a use for the flre hos<> 
that is coiled in the hall of dormi- 
tory number five. They use it to 
revive "Pinky" Johnson and Jolin 
Leach. But Chief says that tlie 
boys can't put the hose back on 
the raeic. 



Bill Newbold tells us that Turn 
Hewitt, upon being awal^en.'d to 
answer Dr. Brown's question, 
"What did Lady MacB.^th sny to 
her husband after lie had killed 
the liing?" answered "One No- 
Trunip." 

• • * 

Monday is wasli-day, but most 
college men are cleaned some time 
between Friday night and Sun- 
day morning. 



Blue bloods on our campus 
whose ancestors traded a few 
quarts of whisky to the Indians 
for thousands of acres of land are 
willing to trade back. 



We find three classes of girls 
at Duke — the beautiful, the intel- 
lectual, and the majority. 



Albert Cotton Arrives 

One of the most delightful sur- 
prises of the season took place 
last Monday morning in the new 
classroom building when Alt)ert 
Cotton met his 11 o'clock class on 
time. At exactly one minute to 
II Mr. Cotton flopped or ambulat- 
ed or — well, whatever it is he does 
— into the class room. Professor 
Xelson fainted and eight students 
slipped out while the others were 
reviving the stupefied instructor. 
On coming back to normalcy about 
fifteen minutes later. Dr. Nelson 
congratulated Mr. Cotton on his 
unusual and astounding prompt- 
ness. Mr. Cotton explained that 
he had passed a very quiet and 
uneventful week-end, having been 
not at all pleasure bent. He did 
look unusually well, being dressed 
in a light gray business suit of 
imported tweed, with a soft silk 
tie of violet hue with socks and 
complexion to match. It being 
now about 11 :30, at which time 
Mr. Cotton usually comes in. Dr. 
Nelson began his lecture, while 
Mr. Cotton took his place on the 
front row in order that he might 
resume his week-end nap without 
being disturbed. 




First Co-ed : "I was held up 
last night by a masked man!" 

Second Co-ed: "Oh! Was he 
good-looking?" 



CO-ED JUSTIFIES 

TWO-DATE POLICY 



Something new in the line of 
dating has been furnished on this 
campus by Miss Saybeth Heidley, 
more commonly known as "Two- 
Date" Heidley. Miss Heidley, 
since coming to this campus from 
Havenport College, has steadfast- 
ly held to a resolution to give no 
boy more than two dates. Be- 
coming curious about this, a re- 
porter was sent to interview Miss 
Heidley and she is quoted as fol- 
lows: 

"Rough necking and wrestling 
is considered an art in the school 
from which I came, and imagine 
my surprise upon coming here to 
find that the boys were sadly de- 
ficient in this ancient Grecian art. 
I concluded that it was up to me 
to teach the boys the art, and 
that my course should be limited 
to two lessons. I made this de- 
cision for two reasons: First, in 
order that the number of pupils 
could be larger. Not being a 
member of the faculty and re- 
ceiving no pay other ^ than the 
knowledge of knowing that I am 
serving my Alma Mater. I can- 
not give my full time to teach- 
ing, and so must shorten the 
course so as to include as many 
students as possible. Second if a 
man does not know the funda- 
mentals of necking after two dates 
with me he is hopeless anyhow, 
so why should I waste my time on 
him?" 

Miss Heidley went on to ex- 
plain that although finish and case 
In the art like she had was only 
to be obtained by years of prac- 
tice, but that anyone could pick 
up the fundamentals in two les- 
sons. Candidates interested in 
taking this course may see either 
Miss Heidley or her male repre- 
sentative. Carlton Weatherby. 
Only those with hearty constitu- 
tions and who are willing to work 
hard need apply. Miss Heidley 
is to be congratulated for the new 



custom which sho Ims inaugurnted 
and wo wish her luck in her plan 
to bring greater glory to the name 
of her Alma Mater. 



SCOTCHMEN HOLD 

NIGHTLY MEETING 



At the most ungodly hour of 
two In the morning last Thursday 
the tight and secret Order of 
Scotchmen held its nightly meet- 
ing at the Puritan Club House. 
used as a welnie stand during the 
hours when the club members 
study. This famous Order of 
Scotchmen contains In Its mem- 
bership many justly famous men 
about the campus, having men In 
both the human and Scotch races 
fthe latter was to be exceedingly 
close). Free crackers and water 
having been served, the club be- 
gan its regular business. Brother 
.lames MacTruesdale preside<l, and 
was .so stingy with the words of 
the English language that he 
spoke Greek the entire time. 
Brother Harry Blvens was fined a 
two-cent stamp for wearing rub- 
ber heels, since It was the unani- 
mous opinion of the lodge that 
they give too freely to be in ac- 
cordance with the rules and regu- 
lations of the Order. Editor Hes- 
ter reported two days later that 
a two-cent stamp had disappeared 
from his office. A motion was 
then advanced by Brother Kirk- 
pa trick to the effect that all 
Scotch .lokes should be suppressed, 
since they are at the expense of 
the Order. Brother Weaver point- 
ed out that they added to the in- 
terest, but Brother Burwell said 
that he objected to the princi- 
pal. The name of James Smath- 
ers was submitted for admission 
to the Order, but Brother Blvens 
blackballed him on the grounds 
that his grandfather had once 
given away a bride. The Scotch 
Quartette, composed of Brothers 
MacTruesdale. Kirkpatrick. Bivens 
and Burweil, then sang, "Let the 
Rest of the World Go Buy," but 
desisted on being told that tli* > 
were wasting breath. The meeting 
was then adjourned, since Brother 
Bivens had to catch a date every- 
thing being free. It is reported 
that Brothers MacTruesdale and 
Kirkpatrick both slept in Sammy 
Goode's bed. since they hated to 
wear out their own sheets. 



JUST A CO-ED 

(With Apologies) 

God took the dew of the morning 
And the sheen of an orient 
pearl ; 
He caught the coo of a homing 
dove 
And the tip of a lily's curl; 
He took the blue of the Irla 
And the scent of a virgin's 
hair. 
And. cuddling them all In His 
great white hand — 
Lo! A co-ed nestled there. 



Y'S STAGE FASHION 
SHOW AT SOUTHGATE 



Last week the Y. W. C. A. 

deviated a little from Its regular 
program and Htag.Mj a fuNhlon 
show In Souihgate Hall. All the 
new spring stylea were d|Hplny<d 
by Miss Rachel WllllamH and 
Miss Lillian Rogers, and the ef- 
fect was very pU-anlng to those 
present. 

In co-operation with this project, 
the Y. M. C. A. also sent some 
representatives to show the new- 
men's fashions. Mr, Jim Thomp- 
son acted as model for thl8 show 
until it came to wearing the 
dainty feminine unmentionables 
which came direct from the 
fashion show In Chicago. He 
drew the line here. Then volun- 
teers were asked for, and it 
seemed that the show was to b<- 
a failure until Mr. David H. 
Thorpe gallantly camo to (he res- 
cue. When he marched before the 
spectators clad In the soft flimsy 
garment that is to be a part of 
the well-groomed man's outfit, he 
was "booed" by the women, who 
objected to having their styles 
copied by the men. But Mr. 
Thorpe's staccato thought came 
to his rescue and he replied that 
turn about was fair play, and 
that he had recently been asked 
by a co-ed if ho could tell how 
suspenders were made to "stay 
on." 

This is not the only rase of the 
co-operation of the two associa- 
tions. Recently Messrs. Piston 
Lope. Cay Tarpenter and Aul 
Pervin spoke to the girls about 
how to choose a husband, and re- 
ceived a reply entitled "We're 
Loolting for 'It.' " 

Such co-operatlon is to be 
praised, and we are sure that 
there are thrills In it for both 
associations. 



FOR SALE 

TKe Campus 

P. R. KRVIN 
LA.MONT ER\1N 
Owners 



THE WHIFFLIN' POOF 



HAMILTON, WITH FIFTEEN 

CENTS, SEES NAVY GAME 



CHARLES ELIZABETH AMONG NOTABLES TO ^\^T- 
NESS GRIDIRON CLASSIC 



mainder of his fortune (five cents) Club but, there being five mem- 
in an orsy of card playing. bers of the club, he was black- 
When the party returned to the balled by eight votes. He states 
campus Sunday afternoon. Ham- that he will institute legal pro- 
ilton immediately applied for ceedings against the club for stuff- 
membership in the Scotchmen's ing the ballot boxes. 



Embarrassed By Lack of Fimds, and Too Proud to Buiii, 
He Weeps Copiously 



Charles Elizabeth Hamilton, one 
of the most outstanding students 
in Dr. McDougaU's psychology 
classes and an all-i'ound popular 
man on the Duke campus, re- 
turned yesterday from "Washington 
and Annapolis, where he attended 
the Navy-Duke game and cab- 
arets. Four of his fraternity 
brothers took the trip with him, 
and they all report the best time 
of the season. 

It seems that on the Thursday 
before the trip on Friday. Ham- 
ilton had paid for three shoe- 
shines for which he had been in 
debt for six weeks, and had paid 
Spruill Thornton ten cents for a 
month-old poker debt. Such enor- 
mous output with no correspond- 
ing income had left friend Hamil- 
ton with a capital stock and sur- 
plus of fifteen cents. Because he 
could not borrow a fountain pen 
and a blank check, Hamilton was 
forced to leave the campus with 
only his fifteen cents. 

The party left the campus Fri- 
day morning and. passing through 
Durham, filled the tank with gas 
and put a supply of five gallons 
in the rear— gas. maybe. Fifteen 
miles out of Durham, Hamilton 
was seen to be bathing his face in 
bitter tears. When asked what 
the trouble was, he bemoaned the 
fact that he was about to die for 
a cigarette. The boys all sympa- 
thized with him, because they 
knew that it was entirely against 
his principles even to think of 
bumming a cigarette. A member 
of the party states that Hamil- 
ton's eyes were red from contin- 
uous crying by the time they 
reached Washington. 

When the party arrived in 
Washington. Willis Kramer let 
Hamilton carry his baggage in so 
that he would not have to pay for 
his room in advance. While in the 
hotel. Hamilton absolutely refused 
to call the bell-hop. because it 
would have broken his heart to 
have the boy bring him ice water 
and give him no tip. 

Friday night the boys tried to 
persuade Hamilton to go to the 
theater with them, but Hamilton 
burst into a flood of indignant 
tears when Kramer offered to take 
him. He consented, however, 
since he was wearing Stewart 
Rogers' shoes, to walk as far as 
the theater with the boys. But 
woe and alas! While walking 
down the street Hamilton passed 
a cabaret, and on looking in, the 
desire to weep canie upon him 



again. The tears having been 
wiped from his eyes by his lov- 
ing brothers, he ventured in. ab- 
solutely refusing any loans that 
were offered him. He got by the 
doorman on Joe Separk's blue suit, 
John Gregory's shirt and tie, and 
aforesaid Stewart Rogers' shoes. 
Having soccessfuUy passed the 
cynosure of admiring eyes, he 
seated himself at a table, where 
he blew himself to soda crackers 
and water with toothpick and 
straw. When asked about a cover 
fee. Hamilton merely pulled out 
his last clean handkerchief and 
spread it on the table. The wait- 
er, being nonplussed. retired. 
When the time came to leave, 
Hamilton was forced to rush 
madly to the American Express 
office to get a dime changed so 
he could tip the waiter. Hamilton 
states that the dancing and en- 
tertainment was wonderful, and 
his brothers confirm the state- 
ment that four of the chorus girls 
were caught in the meshes of his 
manly charms and exuberant per- 
sonality. After the entertain- 
ment Hamilton is said to have met 
one of the girls at the side door, 
where he embraced her fondly and 
parted with her with these words: 
"Don't forget me, little girl." 

The football game, however, ac- 
cording to Hamilton, was the 
most enjoyable feature of the 
trip. At the gate he started 
whimpering, but was quickly con- 
soled by the fact that there was 
no charge for admission. Upon 
being told that a gallon of the 
gas (?) in the rear of the car had 
been consumed, Hamilton relapsed 
into a state of coma, not coming 
to until the voice of a woman was 
heard from the rear. After the 
game Hamilton was nowhere to be 
found. A thorough search was in- 
stituted, and after two hours and 
sixteen minutes of arduous effort. 
Hamilton was found surrounding 
(not surrounded by) a bevy of 
beauty. All efforts to get him 
away were of no avail, until he 
was reminded that there were still 
three gallons of fluid left in the 
car. 

Saturday night the party visit- 
ed Baltimore, where they visited 
the famous gins (not cotton) for 
which that city is so famous. On 
the trip from Baltimore to Wash- 
ington, a gallon and a half was 
consumed. Hamilton states that 
this was exceedingly good mileage. 
The same night in the hotel at 
Washington Hamilton lost the rc- 



Questionnaire 



"Head" Tyree. in order to keep our enrollment down to a num- 
ber which can be accommodated, has prepared a questionnaire which 
must be answered correctly as an admJssion requirement by all pros- 
pective new students. 

Chock the correct answer: 
You came here 

( ) To become cultured? 

( ) To master thoroughly the rules of football? 

Do Zeta Tau Alpha's 

( ) Neck ? 

( ) Refuse to have dates? 

Is A. T. O. 

( ) An association of ex-bartenders? 

( ) A group of theological students? 

Is Jerry Hester 

( ) A big politician? 

( ) A popular novel ? 

Do Kappa Deltas pledge 

( ) Only girls with Lincolns? 

( ) No girls at all? 

Do college boys 

( ) Drink? 

( ) Patronize bootleggers because they are philanthropists? 

Is Lambda Chi 

( ) A local f rat ? 

( ) A Farmers' Union ? 

Does May bet h Steidley 

{ ) Hate men? 

( ) Date dark hor.ses? 



ALL-LITERARY ELEVEN 



Ciiosen l>.v Iiio Km Anil, for t«o weeks (ciaeli ;v( Tyree I'niversity 

Senter A.- tray JOHN I-KACH 

Right Guard (Union Cell) J. FOSTKR BARNES 

Right Tacky HENRY BOST 

Right Outside "SHOHTV BRENT 

Left Gawd AI.BKRT COTTON 

Lost Track "BUZZ" FINLEY 

Left Out JIMMY TRl'ESDAIiE 

Quart Hip-Flask "STUB- STANFIBLD 

Right Hnir-Wit "FATS" JOHNSON 

Lett Half (Not all there) LKSTKR TODD 

Full Belly BAXTER LINNBY 

General Useless "HEAD" TYREE 

Water Boy (Recruited from the Union) MURRAY ATKINS 

Trained (By the Sophs) ANY B. O. S. FRESHMAN 



THE WHIKFLIN' POOF 



O B I T U A R I K S 



The Scott iest 0( tllO Scot.S nain.l.-un luul his hf is v.iy i. u- 

„ noniifiil ho cuts off the heat fin" 

Ilarrv LiuhUt isn't in it **'*" ^^^^ thri'e days of tlie montli 

With a Scotchman that I know. '^"'^ y**' *^*' "^^v^*" ^'^'l'" ^^ establli^h 

H.- srows tighter every minute. * "^'^^' rt'cord for savhig coal. 
Atul his name is — so and so. 



Ilf attends a senior party 

When there's nut a <fTit to pay; 
Vi'u can hear iii.s lauyh riny: 
hearty 
'Cause his pursf is lorkud 
away. 

Ill till- baKpipf's wheeze he revels. 

And when he hears its sound 
He ■■rlings" like forty devils 

And goes twisting round and 
round. 

Wlien he hears tlie clink of 
money 

His eyes light up with pleo. 
It's as dear to him as homy 

Is to the buzzing bee. 

\\'hen he travels to conventions, 
And porters grab his grips. 

He thwarts their good intentions. 
(He can't stand the thought of 
tips). 

"Carlton Club" and "Blue Boar" 
brand 
Gripe his Scottish soul; 
"Half and Half* he'd think quite 
grand 
if changed to "Whole and 
Whole." 
Niiw I know the reader's guessing, 
(And his name I hate to tell); 
Well, there's comfort in confess- 



That this man 
well. 



-Scotch Bur- 
-Truosdale. 



TYREE IN WEST ONCE 



you know said archie tn nidiit- 
ibel as he stretched his languid 
form on the stoop of the union i 
have always suspected this fellow 
tyree to be the descendant of that 
famous cousin of the wife of an- 
drea del aarto the artist some 
tales have been told me in the old 
days of happenings out west 
which substantiate this belief too 
but of course archie i am too 
much of a lady to repeat them 
even to you and then archie you 
know the way he affects the ladies 
about the campus and i must con- 
fess myself that i am not immune 
to his charms at times but only 
at times archie for most of the 
time he bores me to extraction did 
i ever tell you about the time that 
they reserved a portion of the 
quadrangle for him and you know 
of course that there is still some 
talk of placing one of his busts 
In the niche in front of the new 
chapel opposite that of mr duke 
and i don't see archie why they 
don't call this the house that jack 
built and tyree tore down but he 
has his virtues archie just as 



A Scotch Also Ran 

He'd "square hi.s blind j;i'anil- 
niot lier. 
Take her last cent, and leave 
'er. 
This noble gent's none other 
Than our own beloved Bo 
Weaver. 

All summer long lie goe.s to 
school. 
Bvit not for education. 
He til inks he'd be a high-grade 
fool 
To epeiid a good vacation. 

He'll be married in his chicken 
pen; 

I ask you. is that nice? 
He says his Scottish poultry then 

Will get their fill of rice! 

The writer of these Scottish lays 
Was none other than Ye Editor; 

And when it came to Scottish ways 
He was a close conipetitor. 

— Truesdali.'. 



li'FIeet's 

(With Apologies to Kipling) 

When the last dose of "Fleet's" 
has been given, and the bot- 
tles are emptied and dried. 

And not a doctor is living, and 
nurses commit suicide — 

We shall rest and. Faith! we shall 
need it — lie down for an hour's 
sleep or two. 

Till the concoct er of a better 
cart hart ic shall set us to 
work anew! 

(The author died in the College 
Infirmary one hour later). 



Always a Co-Ed 

Bright stars above, a night nt 
love. 
An hour spent just with you. 
A "shack" romance, a gilded 
dance — 
They leave me fi-elin" blue. 
Sunshine or pain, blue skies ni 
rain — 
I find you alw^iys true. 
I have a tip, though you get your 
"dip". 
You'll still be a co-ed. too. 



TO THE ^lEMOUY 

or 

SIGMA fJAMRIA 

Rorn: .Sometime 
Died: Sooner 

REST IN PIECES 



TOMBSTONES 




LET US FIX YOU UP.' 



We Have Had Years of Experience 
With Dead Sisters 



Have a Date with Us and You'll Need 
One 




ZETA TAU ALPHA LITERARY 
SOCIETY 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

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51515151E15151 




IN NUMBERS 



Economic Lav/ 



Hoovet- Cleaner 



IT 5H1NF5 



^^'^V^ 




AA.TT. 




M' '-°"" ^1. 



HfAT SUPPLIES POWER 
fleclro1u« 

Duitti Cleanser 



1.4). E. 




fOUR OUT OF EVERY 

FIVE H/^vE IT^* 

povVians 



27+ 



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THE CHANTICLEER 
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ADAM SAID TO EVE . . . 

Rag Man: Any old clothes? Any old shoes? 

Just a Voice: No. Get away from here. This is a fraternity house. 

Rag Man: Any old bottles? 

The following letter was received by Otis Sawyer : 

"Sir — My typist, being a lady, cannot taice down what I think of you. I, being 
a gentleman, cannot write it. You, being neither, can guess it all." 

iit ^ ^ ^ 

Dr. Wannamaker: My good fellow, how did you happen to be lying in the gutter? 
Baxter Linney : Sh'all right, brother, I just saw two lamp postshs and leaned 
againsht the wrong one. 

"The five physical senses are very deceptive at times," lectured Dr. McDougall. 
"They make things seem real when they really are not." 

A loud, sonorous snore sounded from the rear of the room. "Take for instance 
that sound we have just heard," went on Dr. McDougall. "To most of you it de- 
notes that Hill Pitts is very obviously asleep. However, it is your physical sense de- 
ceiving you. I, who know more about them, know that in reality Bill is not asleep, 

but is dead from the neck up. ' 

^ ^ ^ ^ * 

Weaver: How do you like that $35 suit with two pair of pants? 

Burwcll: The material is excellent, by Jove, it's darn hot wearing both pair at 



Sarah Alice Harris: Spent my vacation up in the mountains. 
Boone: Really? Did you have a guide? 
Sarah Alice : Well — only my conscience. 

»«#•»«■ 

"This case is more serious than I thought," said Chief Schachner when he saw that 
both sides of the window glass were broken. 

iit *- * * * 

Jimmy: I've been filing all of Sal's love letters. 
Shorty: Gee! Are they as rough as that? 

* a * * * 

Parson: Dr. Wannamaker, does your daughter trust in God? 
Dr. Wannamaker: She must, judging from the company she keeps. 

siJ ^ tIt ^ -t 

Actor : A horse ! My kingdom for a horse ! 

Fred Roper (from the gallery) : Will a jackass do? 

Actor: Sure, come right down. 

* ■» * * # 

First Burglar: Where have you been? 

His Partner: Robbing the Sigma Chi section. 

First Burglar: Did you lose anything? 



276 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

« 1 £>12d . 



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This page of blank verse eontrUnited by Albert Cotton and Jinks Waggoner, 
icorking in collaboration. 



277 



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Do r^o x OvjOSfc IM 
-1 HIS *^Oor-i - NOT 
THfsT we div e a 
D/XM N , BUT IT 

HELL TO 
STpAWGEWi 



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IF XOU HAVE- 
WOT VA»»-*a TO DO 
D O t^'T D O 1 T 
H ERE 



THE CHAMTICLEER ROOf^ 
A HAVE M OP REST 

FOR -TlREO 
A^4[? OVERV\/ORKEO 



Ye otde edi-tofo. 




THE CHANTICLEER OFFICE AT 3:59 A. M. 



irBJEjafHfEraja 



THE CHANTICLEER 

• 1 &L*& . 



51515T51S15T5TI 



Financial Report of tke 1928 CKanticleer 

Advertising $1,498,231.00 

Subscriptions 500,(XX).oo 

Student fees and activities 99,236.02 

Fraternities (collected) .50 

Donations from warm and kind friends, among tliem Charles Elizabeth 

Hamilton 

Food evcr\- night for tlu' midnight orgies of the staff $ 75,(K)0.00 

Dance in honor of the editor's first date 60,000.00 

Postage — Annual business .08 

Postage — Assistant Editor's personal 80.00 

Banquet to celebrate the occasion of a staff member dropping in the office 

one day by mistake 90.00 

Rewards to Freshmen for locating Business Manager and Co-I'"d Editor 

when needed 2,{X)0.00 

Janitor, office boy, stationery .35 

Gum for A. D. Pi's on staff 823.1x5 

Persian rug, ba\eux tapestry, etc., for ofTice 4,250.00 

Lucky Strikes for men on staff 7S.00 

Murads and Tareytons for women on staff I25.(!0 

Engraving 1.98 

Printing .98 

Trip to \ew \'ork for the staff 6,000.00 

Cadillac for Business Manager 6,000.00 

Lounges, day beds, Morris chairs for office l,5(Xi.oo 

New dance records 83.0(1 

Bridge cards 9.OO 

Staff bootlegger 10,112.00 

Photographer .37 

All of the profit was given back to the students, the Editor and Business Manager 
calling off their trip to Europe. 



279 



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THE_CHANTJCLEER |51515151S1S1S1 



Dean Herring's Annual Report, 1927-28 



387 grandmothers have died — three of them belonged to Harris Coffin. 

2,376,899 gallons of castor oil have been taken — "Zip" Brawley took 
330 gallons. 

56 sweethearts have been injured — eight of them belonged to the "No 
Longer the Lad" Cotton. 

H. L. Bivens had ingrown toe nails during the mid-semester exams, 
missing them all. 

557 conditions were cleared, Tom Eanes clearing five. 

402 boys went home for money — fifteen of them stayed. 

Bill Pegram went to court thirteen times. 

"Shorty" Kirkpatrick got literary, took Sigma Upsilon bid, and cut 
classes for three days to celebrate with Tom Shaw. 

Professor Shields turned in grades for fall semester of 1926-27 term. 

Sawyer decided not to run for mayor of Durham at the monthly meet- 
ing of Jordan, Tyree, Sawyer, and Herring. 

Students reported that Sears groped for five hundred beautiful thoughts. 
None reported his finding one. 

Hester was called in eight times to explain editorials. Failing each time, 
he sent Ellison the ninth. 

David Thorpe cut classes for a week, went home, and persuaded his 
father to pay for the Sigma Chi dance. Blades and Bell con- 
tributed fifty cents each. 



280 



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Founded 1838 



Chartered 1859 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

TRINITY COLLEGE 

and 

SCHOOLS OF LAW, RELIGION, 
ENGINEERING, AND EDUCATION 

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION AND 
SUMMER SESSIONS 



Endowmenl and Equipment Malfe Possible Unusual Advantages at Low 

Cost to Students 

Traditions and Policies Have an Established Reputation for Excellence 
Throughout the Nation 



FOR CATALOGUE AND INFORMATION 
ADDRESS 

R. L. FLOWERS, Secretary 



Duke University 



Durham, North Carolina 



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MRW 



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'That poster reminds me ... a horseback scene hke this would make 
a good cigarette advertisement ..." 

'Sure, call it 'Thoroughbreds' and it would be perfect for Chesterfield!" 




THEY'RE MILD 

and yet THEY SATISFY 

CISJS, IICGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO. 



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DEC 



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DUC 



AULD'S, Inc. 

fdanufactunng Jeiuelers 



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COLLEGE RINGS A SPECIALTY 

MAKERS OF PRESENT 
STANDARD DUKE RING 

Columbus, Ohio 



a 



ALSTON DAVIS, Representative 



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When your motor's hot. 
And your brain won't fire. 
And it'll take a lot 
To pull out of the mire. 
There's an accurate shot 
To relieve your ire — 

IT'S 

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'Made Its Way by the Way It's 
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CHRYSLER 
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AND 

Ne\v Imperial "80 

Standardized Q^uahty 

NICHOLSON 
MOTOR CO. 






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THE CHANTICLEER 

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THE OWL PHARMACY 



OPPOSITE CAMPUS 



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DRUGS, CIGARS, DRINKS 
AND CANDIES 






Old Hampshire Stationery with 
the University Seal 



SUPPORTS 
DUKE STUDENTS AND DUKE TEAMS 



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Come In and Sec "Doc' 



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THE OWL PHARMACY 



WEST MAIN STREET 



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THE CHANTICLEER 

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5=1 1111 iiiiK )llii( iu( 1:: 

Jonnson-Prevost Dry Cleaning Company 

HAPPY SNAPPY SERVICE 

Main Office Phone Phone Plant 

i 424 W. Main St. F-6451 F-5451 1106 Broad St. c 
ALL LADIES- WORK A SPECIALTY 


i'5U\je\ft 


Royal W. Smitk c 

Furniture 
CASH OR CREDIT 

414 West Main, at Five Points 

Dial F-7801 


■ ^<^TrkDF<; 1^, nilRMAM T^^'s'n.^ 


Durham s Finest 
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J WHERE 

a 

Style, Quality and 
Value 

J Predominate 


AT a 

T. A. HUDSON'S [ 

Mrs. N. T. Yancey 

New Columbia Process Records 
Viva-Tonal Phonograph 

215 W. Main Street c 


SINCE 1885 

This company has been serving a vast 
clientele in North Carolina, and this ripe 
J experience, coupled with complete modern 
3 equipment, is at your command. 

THE SEEMAN 
PRINTERY 

Incorporated 
Durham, North Carolina 

■£i nil inni — 


Rawls-Knigkt Co. 

DRY GOODS t 
READY-TO-WEAR \ 
MILLINERY 

Dependable Merchandise at the Right 
Price 

11 UK - )YU i:£ 



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OUR 

SUPREMACY 

IN THE SOUTHERN 
YEAR-BOOK FIELD 
IS THE RESULT OF 
PERSONAL SERVICE 

THE CAPITOL 

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Ha* KaJ more than twenty yean of 
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515151515151511 



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The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 

The DAVID J. 

MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



a 

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©very Molloy Made 

Cover bears this 

trade mark on the 

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Atlanta-Soutkern 
Dental College 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Four-Year Course, Leading to the 
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New College Buildings 

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Ample Chnical Facilities 

Largest Dental College in Southeast 

Dental Clinics Open the Entire Calendar 

Year 
Entrance Requirements, One Year of Col- 
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Session Opens October First 

For Catalogue and Information Write 

DR. R. R. BYRNES 
Execuiivc Dean 



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THE DURHAM 

LOAN ^ TRUST 

COMPANY 



A Safe, Strong 
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LET'S BE FRIENDS 



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STUDENTS NOTICE! 



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THE SHEA KNITTING MILLS 

OF CHICAGO 

Com^hment Us With. This Half Page 
Advertisement 

They requested us to write the copy, but we feel that the sweaters and other 

equipment they furnish the Athletic Association speak more eloquently than 

could any words of ours. Ask the lettermen who wear their equipment. 



n 






The Chanticleer Staff 



FANCY ICES 



SHERBETS 



DURHAM ICE CREAM CO. 



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incorporated 
West Main Street 



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w on Its Favor 
By Its Flavor 

Phone 1-963 



PUNCH 



BLOCK 



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THE CHANTICLEER 
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Keep Money in tlie 
Bank— Always 

All students, even though the ac- 
count may be small, should keep 
money in the bank. And if possible, 
a savings account. Nothing gives 
you greater comfort or more freedom 
from worry. It teaches thrift hab- 
its, too. 

Tke Fidelity Bank 

DURHAM, N. C. 
"Crooilng Larg:r B\) Serving Bcller" 



Doyle, The Florist 

FLOWERS FOR 
.ILL OCCASIONS 

Flowers According to Doyle 

DURHAIV1, N. C. 



You Are Aln>a\)s Welcome At 

L. E. O'BRIENT'S 
MUSIC STORE 

VICTOR MACHINE AND 
ALL NEW RECORDS 

117 E. MAIN STREET 



THE 

Puritan LuncK 

Opposite Paris Theatre 

THE BEST FOR LESS 
GEORGE AND TOM 



Phone F-0121 



120 E. Main Si. 



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PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



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Tr.R. 378.756 qT653(i v. 15 1926 ■ 

53327aF-2 A 



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-Chaaticleeiu^ 



Tr.R. 578.756 qT853Q v. 15 1928 c.2 

533273